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Publication numberUS3133147 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 12, 1964
Filing dateJul 22, 1960
Priority dateJul 22, 1960
Publication numberUS 3133147 A, US 3133147A, US-A-3133147, US3133147 A, US3133147A
InventorsAuld Jr Edwin C, Imus Robert E
Original AssigneeR E Imus
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Antenna lead clip
US 3133147 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 12, 1964 AUI-D, L 3,133,147 1 ANTENNA LEAD CLIP Filed July 22, 1960 Enema-r /Ml INVENTORS 4 7 r0 exvsys United States Patent O 3,133,147 ANTENNA LEAD CLIP Edwin C. Auld, J12, Pasadena, and Robert E. Imps, Sierra Madre, Calif. (both R. E. Imus, 835 Woodland Drive, Sierra Madre, Calif.)

Filed July 22, 1960, Ser. No. 44,689 3 Claims. (Cl. 174-154) invention relates to antenna lead clips; that is, to devices for supporting antenna leads or other electrical lines in spaced relation to a roof or other surface.

Included in the objects of this invention are:

First, to provide an antenna lead clip which incorporates novel means for clamping a roof shingle or the hke to provide an upright support, and means tor receiving and securing an antenna lead of either the circular or parallel wire t Geor ia, to provide an antenna lea-d clip which may be installed and secured to an antenna lead without the use of tools.

Third, to provide an antenna lead clip in which the antenna lead receiving means includes an insulating element partially rotatable between a lead receiving position, wherein the antenna may be readily inserted or removed by radial movement into or out of the insulating element, and a securing position wherein the lead is tightly gripped and held from contact with metal.

Fourth, to provide an antenna lead clip wherein the clamping means is adapted to lit various types and thicknesses of shingles.

Fifth, to provide an antenna lead clip which although capable of providing a permanent support for an antenna lead or the like, may be readily removed or changed in position, or arranged to permit adjustment of the antenna lead.

With the above and other objects in view, as may appear hereinafter, reference is directed to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side view of the antenna lead clip shown secured to a roof shingle and showing fragmentarily an antenna lead shown secured in the antenna lead clip;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view through 22 of FIG- U=RE 1 showing the base portion of the antenna lead cli FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary sectional view through 3-3 of FIGURE 1 illustrating the manner in which the antenna lead is secured in the antenna lead clip;

FIGURE 4 is a similar hragmentary sectional view with a portion shown in elevation showing the manner in which the clamping disk of the antenna lead clip is positioned to receive an antenna lead;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged tragmentary sectional view taken through 5-5 of FIGURE 4 showing theopposing walls of the antenna lead receiving slit; 7

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGURE 3, showing a modified form of the antenna lead retaining disk, the disk being shown in its lead securing position;

FIGURE 7 is a partialsectional, partial end view thereof, showing the lead receiving disk in its position to receive an antenna lead.

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGURES 3 and 6, showing a further modified form of antenna lead receiving member, with the antenna lead shown as it appears when secured.

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary end elevational view of the FIG. 8 embodiment, showing the position of the disk when disposed so as to receive an antenna lead.

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to FIGURE 3, showing a still further modified form of 3,133,147. Patented May 12, 1964 ice the antenna lead receiving disk, the disk being shown in its position for securing the antenna lead.

FIGURE 11 is a partial sectional, partial elevational view of the FIG. 10 embodiment, showing the modified antenna lead receiving member in position to receive the antenna lead.

The antenna lead clip includes a triangular base loop 1 formed of wire having some degree of springiness. One end of the loop is turned upwardly, as indicated by 2, tor a distance slightly greater than the thickness of a typical shingle S, as shown in FIGURE 1. The upper end of the portion 2 is bent to form a clamp element 3, having one or more steps or shoulders 4 and downwardly sloping portions 5 therebetween. The clamp element 3 forms with the base loop 1 a yield-able clamping means which is adapted to receive shingles of various thicknesses. That is, the clamp means is adapted to fit relatively thin shingles or relatively thick shakes.

The clamp element 3 is b nt upwardly near the side of the loop 1, remote from the upturned apex 2, to form an upturned stem 6 which preferably extends perpendicular to the base loop 1. The upper extremity of the stem 6 terminates in an open loop '7 of circular configuration with the stem 6 disposed in radial relation therewith, and with the extremity of the loop 7 forming with the stem an opening 8.

lI heloop 7 is adapted to receive a disk member 9 having an annular groove 10 which receives the loop 7 so that the disk member is capable of rotation within the loop 7 but is held against axial displacement. In order to rotate the disk member 9, one axial side thereof may be provided with handle lugs 11 as shown in FIGURE 1. The disk member is provided with a radial slit 12 extending somewhat more than half way through the disk member and terminating at its inner end in an enlarged open ing 113.

The slit is adapted to receive an antenna lead L of the type comprising two parallel wires connected by a web; or the opening 13 may receive a round wire lead.

The sides of the radial slit 12 may converge towards each other trom the axial ends of the disk member and be provided with axially displaced ribs 14 as shown'best in FIGURE 5. With this arrangement, when the sides of the slit are pressed towards each other as will be described hereinafter, the axially ofiset ribs tend to produce a rudimentary S bend in an antenna lead L inserted in the slit.

The periphery of the disk member 9, at one side of the radial slit 12, is provided with a notched portion 15. At the Opposite side of the radial slit the annular groove 10 is provided with a radial bulge 16, as is shown best in FIGURE 4.

Operation of the antenna lead clip disclosed in FIG- URES 1 through 5 is as follows:

The triangular base loop 1 is inserted, under a shingle or shake S as shown in FIGURE 1 so that the clamp element 2 bears on top of the shingle or shake and support the stem 6 in substantially perpendicular relation with the surface of the roof. The disk member 9 is rotated so that the radial slit l2 registers with the openings in the loop 7 as shown in FIGURE 4. The antenna lead L is then inserted radially into the slit whereupon the disk 9 is rotated to a position such as shown in FIGURE 3. In doing so the bulge I6 is distorted into the notch 15 as shown in FIGURE 3, so as to close the slit l2 and prevent the antenna lead from moving radially into contact with the loop 7. The dimensions of the bulge 16 may be such that in order for the disk 9 to turn to the position 3 the loop 7 must expand slightly so as to apply and increase constrictive force on the disk member 9 and compress the walls of the slit 12 tightly against the opposite sides of the antenna lead so that the antenna lead is firmly held and may be forced into a rudimentary S configuration by reason of the ribs 14.

Reference is now directed to the construction shown in FIGURES 6 and 7. The construction here shown isessentially the same as the previously described structure except that in place of the notch 15 the groove is provided with an arcuate recess 17 and in place of the bulge 16 there is provided a flexible tongue 18 adapted to fold into the arcuate recess 17 as the disk member is turned from the position shown in FIGURE 7 to the position shown in FIGURE 6. With this arrangement the tongue 18 crosses over the end of the radial slit 12 and completely closes the end so that the anterna lead cannot move radially into contact with the loop 7. As in the first described structure the tongue 18 may be slightly larger than the recess 17 so that on turning of the disk member to the position shown in FIGURE 6 a constrictive force is applied causing the walls of the slit 12 to grip the antenna lead.

Reference is now directed to the construction as shown in FIGURES 8 and '9. In this construction an ovalshaped loop 7a is substituted for the circular open loop '7 and an oval-shaped disk 9a is substituted for the disk 9. The slit 12 is so oriented that when the major axes of the oval loop and oval disk are in coincidence the slit is exposed to the opening 8. Upon rotation of the disk 9a to a position 90 from that shown in FIGURE 9, that is to the position shown in FIGURE 8, the disk 90 is distorted so that the walls of the slit grip the antenna lead.

Reference is now directed to FIGURES 10 and 11. In the construction here illustrated the loop 7 is provided with an internal bulge 19 and the bottom of the annular groove 10 is provided with a notch 28. When the bulge 19 and notch 20 are in registry the slit 12 registers with the opening 8. Upon turning the disk member 9 until the notch and bulge are out of registry, as shown in FIG- URE 10, the disk is distorted so that the walls of the slit 12 grip the antenna lead and the radially outer ends of the slit are compressed sufliciently tight that the antenna lead cannot move radially into contact with the loop 7.

It will be observed that while the base loop 1 and clamp element 3 are particularly designed to grip a shingle or shake forming a part of a roof, the loop 1 may be slipped under a strip of siding on a vertical surface. It will also be observed that while the stem 6 is normally disposed perpendicular to the surface defined by the loop 1, it may be bent into other angular positions as may be desired.

While particular embodiments of this invention have been shown and described, it is not intended to limit the same to the exact details of the constructions set forth, and it embraces such changes, modifications, and equivalents of the parts and their formation and arrangement as come within the purview of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. An antenna lead clip, comprising:

(a) a supporting structure having'an open loop element;

(b) an insulation disk formed of distortable material and having a peripheral groove fitted within said loop element to permit rotation of said disk therein;

(c) said disk also having a radial slit adapted to register with the open side of said loop element to receive an antenna lead, and movable on rotation of said disk to a retaining position confronting a Wall of said loop element;

(d) the confronting walls of said slit having axially offset ribs engageable with opposite sides of said antenna lead at axially. displaced points thereon to resist longitudinal displacement of said antenna lead;

(e) and forming means operable on movement of said disk toward its retaining position to cause said disk to grip said antenna lead.

2. An antenna lead clip, comprising:

(a) a supporting structure having an open loop elernent;

(b) an insulation disk formed of distortable material and having a peripheral groove fitted within said loop element to permit rotation of said disk therein;

(c) said disk also having a radial slit adapted to register with the open side of said loop element to receive an antenna lead, and movable on rotation of said disk to a retaining position confronting a wall of said loop element;

(d) and means operable on movement of said disk toward its retaining position to cause said disk to grip said antenna lead;

(e) said means including a tongue projecting radially from said disk at one side of said slit and a mating recess at 'the opposite side thereof, said tongue adapted to fold into said recess and close said slit on rotation of said disk to its retaining position.

3. An antenna lead clip, comprising:

(a) a supporting structure having an open loop element;

(b) an insulation disk formed of distortable material and having a peripheral groove fitted within said loop element to permit rotation of said disk therein;

(0) said disk also having a radial slit adapted to register with the open side of said loop element to receive an antenna lead, and movable on rotation of said disk to a retaining position confronting a wall of said loop element;

(d) and means operable on movement of said disk toward its retaining position to cause said disk to grip said antenna lead;

(e) said means including a notch in the periphery of said disk and an internal bulge in the wall of said loop element, said notch and bulge adapted to register when said slit registers with the open side of said loop element and misregister when said disk is in its retaining position, whereby said bulge distorts said disk.

ReferencesCited in the fileof this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 369,447 Greenfield -4 Sept. 6, 1887 1,527,346 Brady Feb. 24, 1925 1,625,645 Fort Apr. 19, 1927 1,886,752 Stansberry Nov. 8, 1932 2,291,430 Ingersoll July 28, 1942 2,459,380 Hess Jan. 18, 1949 2,593,130 Flynn Apr. 15, 1952 2,682,609 Wampler June 29, 1954 2,701,820 Marth Feb. 8, 1955 2,733,290 Valius Jan. 31, 1956 2,735,639 Gilfrey Feb. 21, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 80,718 Germany Apr. 18, 1895 1,033,338 France Apr. 1, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US369447 *Sep 6, 1887GREENFIELD a COgbeenfield
US1527346 *May 29, 1922Feb 24, 1925Brady Electric & Mfg CompanyFlexible insulator
US1625645 *Oct 5, 1922Apr 19, 1927Louis FortInsulator
US1886752 *Dec 30, 1929Nov 8, 1932Peerless Novelty CoStand
US2291430 *Feb 17, 1939Jul 28, 1942Borg WarnerFence post insulator
US2459380 *Feb 20, 1946Jan 18, 1949Leo C KrazinskiClothesline holder
US2593130 *Jul 20, 1949Apr 15, 1952Mueller Electric CompanyClamp support for standoff insulators
US2682609 *Jan 7, 1953Jun 29, 1954Wampler Robert RRotating antenna installation
US2701820 *Jun 22, 1953Feb 8, 1955Marth Herbert JStandoff insulator
US2733290 *Dec 17, 1953Jan 31, 1956 valiulis
US2735639 *Jun 4, 1953Feb 21, 1956 Antenna mast support
*DE80718C Title not available
FR1033338A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3226468 *May 20, 1963Dec 28, 1965Cushman Paul AMultiple conduit spacing and clipping apparatus
US3244803 *Aug 26, 1964Apr 5, 1966United Carr IncWiring clip having a rotary operable locking device
US3263026 *May 12, 1965Jul 26, 1966Karl Kihs JosefWire stand-off
US3332653 *Jun 15, 1965Jul 25, 1967Hoelzel Omar FPaint bucket holder with attaching bracket and tool stowing means
US4341367 *Nov 7, 1979Jul 27, 1982Wieland Lee MRoof mounted wire support
US4664552 *Aug 16, 1985May 12, 1987Cecil SchaafErosion control apparatus and method
US4752652 *Sep 3, 1986Jun 21, 1988Nortek CorporationAnti-short bushing
US4905131 *Jan 6, 1989Feb 27, 1990Gary Products Group, Inc.Bracket for decorative lighting
US4921191 *Jun 14, 1988May 1, 1990Rockwell International CorporationAdjustable waveguide/conduit clamp
US4995583 *May 15, 1989Feb 26, 1991Freyssinet International (Stup)Devices for damping the vibrations of stay cables
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/154, 248/237, 248/302, 248/74.1, 174/163.00R
International ClassificationH01P1/00, H01B17/24, H01B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationH02G3/24, H01P1/00
European ClassificationH02G3/24, H01P1/00