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Publication numberUS3134388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 26, 1964
Filing dateJul 11, 1963
Priority dateJul 11, 1963
Publication numberUS 3134388 A, US 3134388A, US-A-3134388, US3134388 A, US3134388A
InventorsPeloso Robert L
Original AssigneePeloso Robert L
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marine engine flushing
US 3134388 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 26, 1964 R. L. PELOSO 3,134,388

MARINE ENGINE FLUSHING Filed July 11, 1963 INVENTOR. KOBE/er L. 51050 Tra /Thu? 1 2 United States Patent 3,134,388 MARINE ENGINE FLUSHING Robert L. Peloso, 157 E. 48th St, New York 17, N.Y. Filed July 11, 1963, Ser. No. $94,347 6 Ciaims. (Cl. 134-466) The present invention relates to apparatus for cleaning the cooling systems of engines, and particularly to such apparatus for flushing inboard marine engines.

Inboard marine engines are usually cooled by pumping the water in which they float through a port extending through the hull of the vessel, thence through the engine cooling system and finally out through an exhaust port extending through the vessel hull. The internal surfaces of such cooling systems obviously become coated with marine matter requiring their periodic cleaning.

The principal object of this invention is to provide apparatus for flushing the cooling system of inboard motors with facility.

Another object or" the invention is to provide such apparatus that can be effectively used While the vessel is in dry-dock.

Another object of the invention is to provide such apparatus of simple and inexepensive construction.

Still another object'of the invention is to provide such apparatus including a container of substantial volume that has the capability of being held sealingly against the hull of the vessel over the inlet port to the marine inboard engine.

In one aspect of the invention, a container of substantial volume and preferably made from a semi-rigid plastic may include an open top and a closed bottom, the former having an internal groove adjacent the open top so that when the open top of the container is forced against the hull, the top edge will deflect sufiiciently to form a seal between the top edge of the container and the hull of the vessel.

In another aspect of the invention, an outwardly facing open channel may be formed along a diameter of the container bottom which may receive lever means that may be employed to force the open end of the container against the hull of the vessel.

In still another aspect of the invention, an inlet to the container may be provided in its side wall and it may be dismountably connected to a hose, the end opposite that connected to the container being connected to the outlet port of a pump.

The above, other objects and novel features of the flushing apparatus will become apparent from the following specification and accompanying drawing which is merely exemplary.

In the drawing:

FIG. 1 is a sectional view of apparatus to which the principles of the invention have been applied;

FIG. 2 is a bottom view of the apparatus of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows along line 2-2 of FIG. 1; and

FIG. 3 is a view of the hull of a boat in dry-dock with the apparatus of the invention applied to it.

Referring to the drawing, the principles of the invention are shown as applied to flusinr'ig apparatus including a container having an open top 11 and a closed bottom 12. The container is shown as a hollow, cylindrical article, and it preferably is a molded plastic article made from a semi-rigid plastic such as polyethylene.

The container 18 may include a groove 13 formed on its inner peripheral wall adjacent its open end for a purpose to be described later. Protruding peripheral ribs 14 may be formed on the exterior surface of the container in its upper half section for facilitating handling the container.

The bottom 12 of container 16 may be provided with an outwardly facing open channel 15 for a purpose which "ice will be explained, and such channel may be located along a diameter of said bottom. An inlet port 16 to the container 10 may be located in its side wall in the lower half section of said container, and it may include a female threaded connector 17 adapted threadingly to receive a male threaded element 18 secured to one end of a hose 19, the opposite end of which may be connected to a pump (not shown) for pumping liquid through said hose and into said container 19.

Referring to FIG. 3, a hull 29 of a boat is shown supported by struts 21, 22 in dry-dock condition. Hull 20 has an inboard motor 23 therein having an inlet line 24 and an exhaust line 25. The ends of these lines extend through the hull 29 in sealing relation thereto, and each includes a check valve therein. The check valve in line 24 permits liquid to flow only from outside the hull 20 through it to motor 23, whereas that in line 25 permits liquid to flow from motor 23 only outwardly through the hull 2% Additionally, the line 24 has an inlet port 26, and line 25 has an outlet port 27, both of which are flush with the outside of hull 20.

In FIG. 3, the container It is shown as held against the hull 29 by applying a lever 28 between a stationary object, which is shown as a carpenters horse 29, and a strut 39 wedged against the base 31 that anchors strut 21. The lever means 28 rests within the channel 15 of container 10, and the force applied causes deformation of the upper edge of container 10 that is lying in contact with the exterior of bull 20 due to its weakened condition by virtue of the internal groove 13. Accordingly, the upper edge of container 10 forms a substantially liquid-tight seal with the hull 20.

When liquid is pumped through hose 19, it fills container 10 and applies pressure liquid to the valve within port 26, forcing it open. The liquid is then forced under pressure through the engine 23, thence out line 25 and port 27, effectively flush-cleaning the engine 23.

Although the various features of the improved apparatus for cleaning the cooling systems of inboard marine engines have been shown and described in detail to fully disclose one embodiment of the invention, it will be evident that chauges may be made in such details and certain features may be used without others without departing from the principles of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there being an inlet port near the closed end of said container; a hose adapted to be connected to said container inlet port through which liquid under pressure is adapted to be pumped; and recessed means in the closed end of said container adapted to receive lever means for forcing the open end of said container against said hull with the inlet port of the engine within the confines of the open end of said container.

2. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a semirigid plastic container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there being an inlet port near the closed end of said container; a hose adapted to be connected to said container inlet port through which liquid under pressure is adapted to be pumped; and recessed means in the closed end of said container adapted to receive lever means for forcing the open end of said container against said hull with the inlet port of the engine Within the confines of the open end of said container.

3. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a semirigid plastic container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there being an inlet port near the closed end of said container; means adjacent the open end of said container for rendering it readily deformable; a hose adapted to be connected to said container inlet port through which liquid under pressure is adapted to be pumped; and recessed means in the closed end of said container adapted to receive lever means for forcing the open end of said container against said hull with the inlet port of the engine within the confines of the open end of said container.

4. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a semirigid plastic container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there being an inlet port near the closed end of said container; a grooveformed along the inner peripheral wall of said container adjacent its open end; a hose adapted to be connected to said container inlet port through which liquid under pressure is adapted to be pumped; and recessed means in the closed end of said container adapted to'receive lever means for forcing the open end of said container against said hull with the inlet port of the engine within the confines'of the open end of said container.

5. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a semi-rigid plastic container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there being an inlet port near the closed end of said container; a hose adapted to be connected to said container inlet port through which liquid under pressure is adapted to be pumped; recessed means in the closed end of said container adapted to receive lever means for forcing the open end of said container against said hull with the inlet port of the engine within the confines of the open end of said container; and means on the exterior of said container for facilitating handling thereof.

6. Apparatus for flushing an inboard marine engine having an inlet port extending through the hull of the boat in which the engine is mounted, comprising a semi-rigid plastic container having a substantial volume, one end of which container is open and the other end closed, there References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 265,204 Williamson Sept. 26, 1882 1,413,907 Gerstenberger Apr. 25, 1922 3,070,255 Krake Dec. 25, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US265204 *Jul 6, 1882Sep 26, 1882 Liamson
US1413907 *Apr 28, 1920Apr 25, 1922Standard Oil CoMetallic drum
US3070255 *Sep 16, 1960Dec 25, 1962Scovill Manufacturing CoRadiator filler neck
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3931828 *Jan 2, 1975Jan 13, 1976Quik-N-Easy Products, Inc.Flushing accessory for outboard motors
US5131421 *Sep 23, 1991Jul 21, 1992Hofbauer Arthur MAdaptor for flushing or cooling stern drive engines
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/166.00R, 141/383, 220/629
International ClassificationF01P3/20
Cooperative ClassificationF01P3/207
European ClassificationF01P3/20C