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Publication numberUS3136367 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1964
Filing dateJun 27, 1961
Priority dateJun 27, 1961
Publication numberUS 3136367 A, US 3136367A, US-A-3136367, US3136367 A, US3136367A
InventorsKenneth A Wright, Kenneth W Solum, James R Solum
Original AssigneeB & W Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liner releasing tool
US 3136367 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1964 K. A. WRIGHT ETAL 3,136,367

LINER RELEASING TOOL 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed June 27, 1961 TM H GWM mouw L WSOW AWSN HHR TT .V EESN NNEI www. KKJ

ATTORNEYS.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII'II'II Il IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHI'IIIIII June 9, 1964 K. A. WRIGHT ETAL 3,136,367

LINER RELEASING TooL Filed June 27, 1961 2 sheets-smeet 2 JAMES R.s

INVENT ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent O 3,136,367 LINER RELEASING TOOL Kenneth A. Wright, Los Angeles, Kenneth W. Solum,

Long Beach, and James R. Solum, Los Angeles,

Calif., assign'orsto B & W Incorporated, Torrance,

Calif., a corporation of California Filed June 27, 1961, Ser. No. 120,065 12 Claims. (Ci. MSG- 208) This invention relates to a tool from which a well pipe casing or liner may depend and which can release the well pipe casing or liner as desired through particular predetermined movements.

In various operations in the drilling and completion of wells, it is often desirable to release some lower portion of the well casing or liner which in turn remains in the well bore indefinitely or until removed by some other operation. One particular operation in which it is desirable to release a well casing depending from a Well pipe or drill pipe is when the casing is cemented in the well bore prior to further and deeper drilling of the well. Another such operation is when a liner is cemented in the well bore in preparation for perforating and nal completion.

In each of the particular operations noted, and in Various other operations connected with the drilling and completion of wells, it has been found advantageous in some situations to be able to rotate the hole drill string and well casing until just before the well casing or liner is released. For example, one of such situations is encountered when rotating type scratchers are used to condition the well bore and drilling mud therein in order to obtain a more homogenous and complete cement iill of the annulus between the casing or liner and the well bore. For rotating type scratchers to accomplish any useful function, the Well casing or liner supporting the scratchers must be rotated to agitate the drilling mud and abrade the Well bore. It has often been found that the longer this rotation can be continued during the placement of the cement, the greater the opportunity is for a successful and complete cement job.

The ever present danger of getting the drill pipe or Well pipe stuck in the Well bore after the cement has once been introduced has resulted in the current practice of terminating rotation of the drill string and well casing long before the cement has been completely placed. yThis practice results in a time lapse of sufcient duration to permit some of the drillingr mud to gel so that the How of drilling mud in the annulus assumes a channeling condition whereby not all of the drilling mud in the annulus is being displaced. As the cement is introduced in the annulus it also assumes this channeling condition established within the drilling mud. With these physical conditions in the annulus, there is an imperfect fill of cement and a resultant imperfect cementing of the Well casing and/or liner in the Well bore. However, if the drilling mud is thoroughly agitated and agitation is continued up 'to or including the time when the cement enters the annulus then channeling is inhibited since the drilling mud is not permitted to gel. Agitation during placement of the cement has been found to promote a complete displacement of the drilling mud by the cement slurry resulting in the preferred cementing of the liner. In this specification, the word liner is intended to include the liner or casing supported by the releasing tool.

It is therefore the principal object of this invention to provide a liner releasing tool in which means are provided for rotating the liner until immediately preceding a release thereof.

Another object of this inventionis to provide a liner releasing tool in which means are provided for rotating a liner having from the tool and releasing the liner by merely setting weight down on the releasing tool and continuing to rotate.

A further object of this invention is to provide a liner releasing tool in which means are provided for rotating or releasing the liner wherein the liner cannot be released by mere axial movement of the releasing tool.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a liner releasing tool in which means are provided for releasing a liner which has become stuck in the well bore without requiring either axial or rotational movement of the stuck liner.

A further object of this invention is to provide a liner releasing tool in which means are provided for releasing the liner by rotation of the drill string or Well pipe above the releasing tool without regard for the amount of weight resting downwardly on the releasing tool.

Other and more detailed objects and advantages of this invention will appear from the description in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE l isV an elevational view in partial section illustrating the invention with the various parts thereof in relative position for running a liner in the hole.

FIGURE 2 is an elevational View partially sectioned with the various parts of the invention in their relative positions during releasing of the liner.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view partially sectioned with the casing or liner released and the releasing tool lifted away from the top of the liner.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional plan view taken substantially on the line 4-4 in FIGURE l.

FIGURE 5 is a sectional plan View taken substantially on the line 5-5 in FIGURE l.

FIGURE 6 is a sectional plan view taken substantially on the line 6-6 in FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 7 is an elevational view of the releasing tool of this invention attached to the top of a liner hanger set in a casing with the tool of this invention in a position for releasing from the liner hanger.

Referring now to the drawings, the liner releasing tool assembly, generally designated 1t), may be secured to the top of a casing coupling 11 by standard threads 12 and the liner 13 to be released is attached to the casing coupling 11. The releasing tool assembly 10 may have a well or drill pipe 14 attached to its upper end by standard threads 15 for running the tool assembly 10 and liner 13 into the well bore and for operating the tool assembly 10 to release the liner 13 and lift that part of the tool assembly 10 out of the well borewhich does not remain attached to the liner.

A mandrel 16 of the tool assembly 10 extends substantially the length of the assembly and may be attached to a wash or tail pipe 17 at its lower end by threads 18. A sleeve assembly, generally designated 19, has a collar member 20 and a sleeve extension 21 connected by threads 22. The collar member 20 has an internal bore 23 adapted for slidable and rotatable engagement with the external cylindrical surface 24 of the mandrel 16.

An elongated sleeve or bushing 25 has an internal bore 26 adapted for slidable and rotatable engagement with the external cylindrical surface 27 of the mandrel 16. The upper end of the bushing 25 has an externally upset portion 28 forming a downwardly facing shoulder 29. A cooperating and upwardly facing shoulder 30 is formed on the sleeve extension 21 to support and retain the bushing 25 within the sleeve assembly 19.

A connector collar 31 of tool assembly 10 is provided for connecting the assembly to the collar 11 through threads 12. The upper end of the collar 31 has an internal thread 32 adapted to threadedly engage the external thread 33 on the lower end of the bushing 25.

When the liner has been-released as hereinafter described, the connector collar 31 remains attached to the liner through threads 12 and, as illustrated in FIGURE 3, is not removed from the well bore with the remainder of the tool assembly 10.

MeansA are provided for selectively rotating either the internal bores 23 and 26 of the collar member 20 and bushing 25, respectively. With the liner 13 hanging from the releasing tool 1t), the lugs 34 engage the slots 35 of the collar member as best illustrated in FIGURE 4 so that rotation of the mandrel 16 causes rotation of the sleeveV assembly 19 which in turn causes rotation of the connector collar 31 which results in rotation of the liner 13, as desired. Relative rotation of the sleeve extension 21 and the connector collar 31 when the tool is assembled as illustrated in FIGURE l, is prevented by means of axially extending lugs 37 on the lower end of the sleeve 21 which extendinto slots 38 in the upper end of the connector collar 31.

In order to release the liner 13, the mandrel 16 is lowered relative to the sleeve assembly 19, collar 31, bushing 2,5 and liner 13 so that the lugs 34 on the mandrel engage the slots 36 in the bushing 25 as illustrated in FIGURE 2. With the various parts of the releasing tool assembly 10 in this position, rotation of the mandrel 16 causes rotation of the bushing 25 relative to the connector collar 31 thereby unthreading the threads 32 and 33. Although threads 32 and 33 could be right-hand, we prefer to make them left-hand threads so that in accordance with accepted drilling and completion practices, the drill pipe 14 is rotated in a Vright-hand direction to accomplish the unthreading of the threads 32 and 33, and such right-hand rotation will not inadvertently unthread the drill pipe couplings or casing couplings which are normally righthand threads. In order to accomplish the downward movement of the mandrel 16 relative to the remainder of the tool assembly 10, liner 13 is rested on the bottom of the hole or otherwise supported within the well bore.

Means may be provided for promoting the ease of rotation ofthe mandrel 16 when lowered relative to the remainder of the tool assembly, and as shown in the Vdrawings, these means may include a thrust bearing assembly, generally designated 39, connecting the mandrel 16 to the `drill pipe 14 through the threads 15. This bearing assembly 39 may be comprised of coupling member 4t) engaging the drill pipe 14 through threads 15 which is threadedly connected to the upper end of the mandrel 16 by threads 41, and a thrust flange 42 rotatably mounted on the mandrel 16 with a plurality of bearing balls 43 entrapped between the coupling member and the thrust ange 42. A set screw 44 is threadedly received in the coupling member 46 for engaging the upper end of the mandrel 16 to prevent inadvertent unthreading of the coupling member from the mandrel. An upwardly facing shoulder 45 on the mandrel 16 limits vthe axial downward movement of the thrust lange 42 relative to the coupling member 40, thus retaining the bearing balls 43 entrapped between the coupling and the flange. As the mandrel 16 is lowered relative to the sleeve assembly 19, the downward facing surface 46 of the thrust flange 42 frictionally engages Vthe upward facing surface 47 of the collar member 20 as illustrated in FIGURE 2, whereby rotation of the drill pipe 14 and coupling Aiuto rotate the mandrel 16 results in relative rotation between the coupling 40 and the iiange 42. Thus, it may be seen that the downward force on the coupling 40 is transmitted to the bearing balls 43 to the flange 42 and thence through the sleeve assembly 19 to the connector collar 31 and to the liner 13, thereby preventing any thrust loading on the bushing 25 as it is being Unthreaded from the connector collar 31;

Sufficient axial space is provided between the collar member 20 and the upper end of the bushing 25 to permit complete unthreading of threads 32 and 33 without axial separation of sleeve extension 21 and connector collar 31. The slots 36 in the bushing 25 are also of sucient length to permit the above-described unthreading without axial movement of the mandrel 16 to maintain engagement of the lugs 34 in the slots 36.

When the threads 32 and 33 have been completely separated further rotation of the mandrel has no effect, and thus accurate counting or estimating the number of turns necessary to release the liner is not required, thereby eliminating one of the inherent weaknesses in many comnercial tools of this type. Upon lifting the drill pipe 14, the releasing tool may be removed from the hole as illustrated in FIGURE 3, leaving the connector collar 31 threadedly mounted on the liner.

Various O-ring grooves and O-ring seals 48 are pro vided to permit pre-packing of the releasing tool with the proper lubricants, and these seals serve to inhibit the contamination of the lubricants by foreign matter within the well bore. The pre-lubrication'assures the proper releasing of the threads 32 and 33 and the proper axial movement of the mandrel relative to the various other parts of the tool assembly.

In order to assemble the releasing tool the collar member 2t) must be inserted onto the upper end of the mandrel 16 before the bearing assembly 39 is installed and the bushing 25 must be inserted onto the lower end of the mandrel 16 before the sleeve extension 21 is threaded onto the collar member 2G at thread means 22. In order to connect the connector collar 31 to the assembly, the lugs 37 of sleeve lextension 21 are positioned in the slots 3S of the connector collar 31 and the lugs 34 of mandrel 16 are lowered into the slots 36 of the bushing 25 whereby left-hand rotation of the mandrel 16 threadedly connects the threads 32 and 33. The threads 32 and 33 are engaged to the position where the shoulders 29 and 30 of the bushing 25 andrsleeve extension 21, respectively, become engaged thereby securing the sleeve extension 21 to the connector collar 31.

As illustrated in FIGURE 7; the releasing tool assembly 10 may be incorporated with a liner hanger, generally designated 50, when it is undesirable to rest the casing or liner 13 on the bottom of the well bore. To maire proper userof the releasing tool by rotation of the liner before and during the placing of the cement, it is necessary to provide a liner hanger 50 which does not set upon rotation and, in fact, we prefer to use a liner hanger which may be set by mere. axial movement such as the hanger which is the subject of our now issued patent on our copending application entitled Slip Actuating Mechanism, Patent No. 3,012,612, issued December 5, 1961. The upper end 51 of the `liner hanger may be machined similar to the connector collar 31 including the internal threads 32 and the slots 38 so that the sleeve extension 21 and the bushing 25 engage the upper end 51 of the hanger in the same manner that they engage the connector collar 31 heretofore described. Thus, with the slips 52 of the hanger 50 engaging the well casing 53 previously cemented in the well bore, the drill pipe 14 may be rotated to separate the releasing tool assembly 10 from the upper end 51 of the liner hanger 50 as described above relative to FIGURES 2, 3 and 6.

From the foregoing, it may be seen that a liner-releasing tool is provided which is capable of quickly releasing a liner by merely lowering the drill pipe and rotating. This release may be affected even though the liner has become stuck and yet inadvertent release of the liner can be safely avoided by merely not rotating the drill pipe when theweight of the drill pipe is down on the liner.

Havingfully described our invention, it is to be understood that we do not wish to be limited to the details herein set forth or to the details illustrated in the drawings,

but our invention is of the full scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

l. In a well tool for releasing a Well pipe or the like having an upper end provided with thread means and upwardly facing slot means, the combination of: a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, lug means on said sleeve for engaging the slot means of the well pipe upper end to transmit rotational movement from said sleeve to the Well pipe, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread means for threaded engagement with the thread means on the well pipe upper end, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of said mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

2. In a well tool for releasing a well pipe or the like having an upper end provided with thread means and upwardly facing slot means, the combination of: a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, lug means on said sleeve for engaging the slot means of the well pipe upper end to transmit rotational movement from said sleeve to the well pipe, said sleeve having internal slots adjacent said mandrel, aL bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread means for threaded engagement with the thread means on the well pipe upper end, said bushing having internal slots adjacent said mandrel, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging the said slots in either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of the mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or the bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

3. In a well tool for releasing a well pipe, the combination of: a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, a collar for connecting to the well pipe, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, thread means on said collar, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread means for threaded connection with said thread means on said collar, engageable means on said sleeve and on said bushing, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging said engageable means of either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of the mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

4. In a well toolr for releasing a Well pipe, the combination of: a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, a collar for connecting to the well pipe, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, thread means on said collar, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread means for threaded connection with said thread means on said collar, engageable means on said sleeve and on said bushing, means on said bushing for engaging said sleeve to maintain said'interengaging means in engagement while Said bushing is connected to said collar by said thread means, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging said engageable means of either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of the mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

5. In a well tool for releasing a well pipe, the combination of: a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, said sleeve having internal slots adjacent said mandrel, a collar for connecting to the well pipe, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, thread means on said collar, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread means for threaded connection with said thread means on said collar, said bushing having internal slots adjacent said mandrel, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging the said slots in either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of the mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or the bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

6. In a well tool for releasing a well pipe, the combination of a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, said sleeve having slots adjacent said mandrel, a collar for connecting to the well pipe, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, thread means on said collar, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having threaded means for threaded connection with said thread means on said collar, said bushing having internal. slots adjacent said mandrel, means on said bushing for engaging said sleeve to maintain said interengaging means in engagement while said bushing is connected to said collar by said thread means, and means carried by said mandrel for selectively engaging the said slots in either said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of the mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or the bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

7. In a well tool for rotating and releasing a well pipe or the like, the combination of: a mandrel, a drive sleeve having a lower end, said sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel,` an internal upwardly facing shoulder on the said lower end of the sleeve, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and within said sleeve, said bushing having an upper and lower end, a downwardly facing shoulder on said bushing upper end for engaging said upwardly facing shoulder on said sleeve to limit axial movement of said bushing downwardly relative to said sleeve, thread means on the said lower end of the bushing, a connector collar having a lower end with means for connection to a well pipe or the like, an upper end on said collar'having thread means for engaging said bushing thread means, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, engageable means on said sleeve and on said bushing, and means carried by the mandrel for selectively engaging said engageable means of either the said sleeve or said bushing upon axial movement of said mandrel to rotate either the sleeve or the bushing upon rotation of said mandrel.

8. In a well tool for rotating and releasing a well pipe or the like, the combination of a mandrel, a drive sleeve having an upper and lower end, an inwardly extending flange on the said upper end of the sleeve slidably and rotatably engaging the said mandrel, an internal upwardly facing shoulder on the said lower end of the sleeve, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and within said sleeve, said bushing having an upper and lower end, a downwardly facing shoulder on said bushing upper end for engaging said upwardly facing shoulder on said sleeve to limit axial movement of said bushing downwardly relative to said sleeve, thread means on the said lower end of the bushing, a connector collar having a lower end with means for connection to a well pipe or the like, an upper end on said collar having thread means for engaging said bushing thread means, interengaging means on said sleeve and said collar for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said collar, a noncircular inner surface on the said upper end of the sleeve, a similar non-circular inner surface in said bushing, and a similarly shaped non-circular enlarged portion on said mandrel whereby through axial movement of said manthe non-circular enlarged portion may engage the` like inner surfaces of either the sleeve or the bushing to cause rotation thereof upon rotation of said mandrel.

9. In a well tool for rotating and releasing a well pipe or the like, the combination of: a mandrel, a drive sleeve having an upper and lower end, an inwardly extending flange on the said upper end of the sleeve slidably and rotatably engaging the said mandrel, an internal upwardly facing shoulder on the said lower end of the sleeve, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and within said sleeve, said bushing having an upper and lower end, a downwardly facing shoulder on said bushing upper end for engaging said upwardly facing shoulder on said sleevetto limit axial movement of said bushing downwardly relative to said sleeve, thread means on the said lower end of the bushing, at least one downwardly extending lug on the said lower end of 'the sleeve, a conneetor collar having a lower end with means for connection to a well pipe or the like, an upper end on said collar having thread means for engaging said bushing thread means and also a slot for receiving the said lug on the lower end of the sleeve, a non-circular inner surface on the said upper end of the sleeve, a similar non-circular inner surface in said bushing, and a similarly shaped noncircular enlarged portion on said mandrel whereby through axial movement of said mandrel 'the non-circular enlarged portion may engage the like inner surfaces of either the sleeve or the bushing to cause rotation thereof upon rotation of said mandrel.

10. In a well tool for rotating and releasing a Well pipe or the like, the combination of: a mandrel, a drive sleeve having an upper and lower end, an inwardly extending lange on the said upper end of the sleeve slidably and rotatably engaging the said mandrel, an internal upwardly facing shoulder on the said lower end of the sleeve, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and within said sleeve, said bushing having an upper and lower end, a downwardly facing shoulder on said bushing upper end for engaging said upwardly facing shoulder on said sleeve to limit axial movement of said bushing downwardly relative to said sleeve, thread means on the said lower end of the bushing, at least one downwardly extending lug onthe said lower end of the sleeve, a connector collar having a lower end with means for connection to a well pipe or the like, an upper end on said collar having thread means for engaging said bushing thread means and also a slot for receiving the said lug on the lower end of the sleeve, a non-circular inner surface on the said upper end of the sleeve, a similar non-circular inner surface in said bushing, a similarly shaped noncircular enlarged portion on said mandrel whereby through axial movement of said mandrel the non-circular enlarged portion may engage the like inner surfaces of either the sleeve or the bushing to cause rotation thereof upon rotation of said mandrel, and the said sleeve ilange engaging the enlarged portion of said mandrel to limit relative axial movement of said sleeve and mandrel.

11. In a well 'tool for rotating and releasing a well pipe or the like, the combination of: a mandreLa drive sleeve having an upper and lower end, an inwardly extending flange on the said upper end of the sleeve slidably and rotatably engaging the said mandrel, an internal upwardly facing shoulder on the said lower end of the sleeve, a bushing slidably'and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and within said sleeve, said bushing having an upper and lower end, a downwardly facing shoulder on said bush- Ving upper end for engaging said upwardly facing shoulder on said sleeve to limit axial movement of said bushing downwardly relative to said sleeve, thread means on the said lower end of the bushing, at least one downwardly extending lug on the said lower end of the sleeve, a connector collar having a lower end with means for connection to a well pipe or the like, an upper end on said collar having thread means for engaging said bushing thread means and also a slot for receiving the said lug on the lower end of the sleeve,` a non-circular inner surface on the said upper end of the Sleeve and below said flange, a similar nonecircular inner surface in said bushing, a mating non-circular enlarged portion on said mandrel whereby through axial movement of said mandrel the noncircular enlarged portion may engage the like inner surfaces of either the sleeve or the bushing to cause rotation thereof upon rotation of said mandrel, the said sleeve flange engaging the enlarged portion of said mandrel to limit relative axial movement of said sleeve and mandrel, and bearing means mounted on the upper end of said mandrel for engaging the said sleeve ilange upon downward movement of said mandrel relative to said sleeve whereby axial downward forces are transmitted from the mandrel through the bearing means, through the sleeve, through the connector collar to the well pipe to permit relative free upward movement of said bushing in releasing the cooperating thread means upon rotation of said mandrel.

12. In a well tool for hanging and releasing a well pipe, within a well casing, the combination of: a hanger assembly having means for hanging a well pipe inside the well casing, said hanger assembly having upper yand lower ends, said lower end connected to the well pipe, a mandrel, a sleeve slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel, interengaging means on said sleeve and said upper end of the hanger for transmitting rotational movement of said sleeve to said hanger, thread means on the said upper end of the hanger, a bushing slidably and rotatably mounted on said mandrel and having thread tion of said mandrel.

References Cited in the file of this patent,

UNITEDv STATES PATENTS 1,870,779 Layne et al Aug. 9, 1932 1,982,915 Jenks Dec. 4, 1934 2,097,755 Brown ,Nov. 2, 1937 2,307,275 Johnson Jan. 5, 1943 2,500,276 y Church Mar. 14, 1950 2,670,045 Armentrout Feb. 23, 1954 3,002,561 Baker et al.` Oct. 3, 1961 3,006,414 Burns Oct. 31, 1961

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3368829 *Aug 10, 1965Feb 13, 1968Halliburton CoSafety joint
US3779313 *Jul 1, 1971Dec 18, 1973Regan Forge & Eng CoLe connecting apparatus for subsea wellhead
US4440233 *Jul 6, 1982Apr 3, 1984Hughes Tool CompanySetting tool
US4441560 *May 13, 1983Apr 10, 1984Hughes Tool CompanySetting tool
US4489781 *Jun 27, 1983Dec 25, 1984Weeks Benjamin RSetting tool and right-hand set mechanical liner hanger
US4554976 *May 12, 1983Nov 26, 1985Hydril CompanyTest tool for subsea blowout preventer stack
US4598774 *Jul 31, 1985Jul 8, 1986Hughes Tool CompanySetting tool with retractable torque fingers
US4681159 *Dec 18, 1985Jul 21, 1987Mwl Tool CompanySetting tool for a well tool
US5048606 *Sep 10, 1990Sep 17, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Setting tool for a liner hanger assembly
US5074362 *Sep 10, 1990Dec 24, 1991Lindsey Completion Systems, Inc.Finger nut setting tool and liner hanger assembly
US7802824 *Nov 26, 2003Sep 28, 2010Unomedical A/SConnecting piece for a tubing
US8191639 *Apr 18, 2006Jun 5, 2012Tercel Oilfield Products Uk LimitedDownhole swivel sub
US8511392May 30, 2012Aug 20, 2013Tercel Oilfield Products Uk LimitedDownhole swivel sub
US20080236841 *Apr 18, 2006Oct 2, 2008Caledus LimitedDownhole Swivel Sub
DE2347176A1 *Sep 19, 1973Mar 27, 1975Regan Forge & Eng CoSubsea well casing hanger connector - with telescopic tubular members for selectively transmitting torque to hanger
WO1992006269A1 *Sep 24, 1991Apr 16, 1992Union Oil Company Of CaliforniaRelease joint
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/208, 285/307, 285/330, 166/124, 285/922
International ClassificationE21B17/06
Cooperative ClassificationY10S285/922, E21B17/06
European ClassificationE21B17/06