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Publication numberUS3136398 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 9, 1964
Filing dateSep 19, 1961
Priority dateSep 19, 1961
Publication numberUS 3136398 A, US 3136398A, US-A-3136398, US3136398 A, US3136398A
InventorsSidney Platt
Original AssigneePlatt Luggage Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carrying case
US 3136398 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 9, 1964 s. PLATT CARRYING CASE Filed Sept. 19. 1961 IN VEN TOR.

United States Patent 3,136,398 CARRYING CASE Highland Park, 111., assignor to Platt Luggage, Inc., Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Filled Sept. 19, 1%1, Ser. No. 139,311

Claims. (Cl. 19051) Sidney Flatt,

This invention relates generally to carrying cases for sporting equipment, and more specifically, to a case particularly adapted to facilitate the carrying of a bowling ball and other bowling accessories.

Various means have been provided for transporting individual bowling balls, bowling shoes, and other related accessories. Flexible bowling ball bags, fabricated of cloth or plastic, are now well-known, but bags of this type provide little protection for the ball.

Further, the handles of such bags are normally secured by rivets or fasteners, and the flexible material frequently weakens at the area of attachment, resulting in eventual tearing and necessitating either extensive repair or replacement. n

In addition, with the use of a flexible material, the shape of the bag when carried conforms rather closely to the shape of the ball. Hence, even when the bag is opened, as by a zipper, the removal of the ball is often diflicult because of the tendency of the bag to cling to the ball while the ball is being lifted out of the .bag. Frequently, therefore, the bag must be held with one hand while the ball is lifted out with the other;

Moreover,when shoes and other equipment are ,carried in the bag and are'shoved into the space'between the walls of the bag and the ball; they are not readily ac cessible' and in addition, the storage and carrying of the shoes in that manner causes the soles of thesh oes to assume a curved shape'as a result of being pressed into inand of relatively shorter life;

Attempts have been made rigid material so as to overcome some'o'f the objectionable features inherent in the flexiblebag, butnone of the rigid cases now available isopenable in a manner providing ready and complete access to its contents while standing in a stabilized upright or carrying position on the floor.

Furthermore, whereas the side walls of bowling ball cases formedof flexible material tend to grip the ball to a certain extent when the 'case is being carried and thereby prevent movement of the ball within the case, no

fore, is to provide an improved rigid, carrying case for:

a bowling ball which will permit easy insertion and removal of the ball while the case standson the floor. 'A further object or the fixing the ball in place within the'case.

Other objects and advantages of the inventionbecome apparent with reference ,to the following description and accompanying drawings. 2' I Inthe drawings: 3

FIGURE 1 is a perspective side view of a case-in accordance with the present invention;

FIGURE'Z is a' perspective end'view ofthev case of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a partially, sectioned end yiewof the to provide carrying cases of one end (FIGURE i timate contact with the ball; making them uncomfortable gage and similar cases known in the art, will not be described invention is to provide a case for at bowling ball in which bowling shoes can alsobe' stored. without deformation because of the contact with the'ball. A still further objectof'thednvention is to providea' rigid case for a bowling .ball which includesimeans for or upset the base shell 25.

, during handling of the 3,136,398 Patented June 9, 1964 case of FIGURE 1, showing an outline of a bowling ball as it would appear supported within the case;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the case. of FIG- URE l with the case in an open position; and

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged partially broken away, sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIGURE 2.,

Referring to the drawings, and in particular to FIG- URES 2 and 3, the present invention comprises a hollow case 11 having a base member 13, side walls 15 and 17, end walls 19 and Z1, and a top wall 23. The case 11 has a generally trapezoidal cross section as viewed from 3), with the side walls tapering inwardly slightly toward the top and the top wall 23 being thereby somewhat narrower than the base 13. The walls are rounded where they meet with one another to provide an attractive appearance, and also to eliminate sharp edges or corners which would make carrying of the case uncomfortable, as well as subject it to excessive local wear.

The case 11 is divided into two parts along a plane which passes diagonally through the end walls 19 and 21 so as to provide alower or bottom shell 25 and an upper or closure shell 27 each of which is open on one side. Both of the resulting upper and lower shells are of a generally triangular cross-section and mate with each other along a rim 29, which defines their open side, in a manner which will be described in detail shortly.

from the side or end'walls, but more important, without any necessity for further re-orientation of the case on any surface where it may conveniently have been put down.

. The upper'shell swings between the open and closed positions on a pair of hinges 31 which interconnects a sideedge 14 of the base 13 with a lower side edge of the closure shell 27. As shown inFIGURE 3, the side edge 14 is turned upwardly somewhat adjacent the hinge 31 so as to elevate the hinge above the plane of the base. Thus,

when the-case is opened, the upper shell may lie hat on the floor without exerting any lifting shell 27 in the open position shown in FIGURE 4 does not upset the stability or to cause it to tip or become otherwise displaced from its normal position.

The upper and lower shells of the case 11 are maintained in a closed condition by a releasable clasp 33 provided at the top of the case, as 2 and 3; The clasp is of the type commonly used for lugand, because it is relatively well detail.

1 To strengthen the structure of the bottom shell 2 5, and i also to provide a means is formed so as'to include a 35 is integral with the base 7 wall 37 and an inner dish??? which has a shape corresponding to that of thesurface ofthe ball so "as to enable it to' distribute the weight of the ball over a larger area; The side wall 37 of the ring is inclined inwardlyand upwardly and, although the base is constructed of a relative-t.

slightly ly rigid material, the ring 35-will flex slightly in response to the weight of the ball and cushion the ball from shock case.

The lower surface of the base is raised from the supporting surface by pads-or. feet 41 to, permit flexing of the base for a cushioning effect when the ball. is placed in the case.- The pads 41 are preferably formed of rubben or other resilient material and are located so that the hinge leverage tending to rock, Further, placing of the closure 1 balance of the bottom shell 25 so asshown most clearly in FIGURES herein in further:

for maintaining a ball in placewithin thejcase, the base 13 ball-retaining ring 35. ;As shown in FIGURE 3,the ring 13 and includes an outer side;

31 overhangs somewhat a pair of the pads so as to thereby further facilitate the opening and closing of the case.

The side wall 15 of the bottom shell 25 and the side wall 17 of the closure shell 27 are preferably stiffened, as by ribs or corrugations 43 as seen in FIGURE 3.

The closure or upper shell 27 of the case comprises generally the top wall 23, the side wall 1'7, and the upper sections of the end walls Hand 21. The closure 27 is provided with a carrying handle 4-5 which is pivotally mounted on the top wall 23 by means of a pair of brackets 47.

In order that the case may be closed in such a manner that 'it will protect the contents from the weather, dust, etc., the rim 29 of each of the upper and lower shells is provided with a metal border 49 and 51 respectively, as shown in FIGURE 5. The borders 49v and 51 mate with one another so that they overlap slightly and thereby provide a generally weather-tight seal. In this regard, the border 49 includes an upper flange 53 and the border 51 includes a lower flange 55, with the fiange'53 overlying the flange 55 when the case is in a closed position.

Support for various bowling accessories, as well as a means for preventing dislodgement of the ball from the ring 35 is provided by a shelf 57 pivotally mounted within the case able with the upper surface thereof so as to fix the ball in place. The shelf 57 comprises a flat generally rectangular plate 59 which is curved upwardly at its side edges so as to provide end walls 61 and 62 and a side wall 63 which serves to retain items on the upper surface of the shelf. A fourth edge 64 of the plate remains relatively flat.

The shelf 57 is sufliciently wide to accommodate a pair of shoes (not shown) and, of course, various smaller items if desired.

The shelf is pivotally mounted within the case 11 so that it can be moved from a ball-engaging horizontal or first position to an out of'the way upwardly inclined or second position (not shown) which will facilitate insertion and removal of the ball. The pivotal mounting is accomplished by means of rivets 67 which secure the curved end Walls 61 and 62 to the uppermost corner of the end walls 19 and 21 respectively of the base shell 25, with the flat edge 64 of the shelf being adjacent the side wall of the base shell. Downward pivotal movement of the shelf past the horizontal position is limited by engagement with the ball and by the engagement of the rearward edge 64 of the shelf with the side wall 15 of the base shell 25.

To facilitate the engagement between the shelf 57 and the upper surface of the ball, the plate 59 is formed with an upwardly projecting dome 69 having a concave lower surface 71 which is positioned so as to contact the upper surface of the ball and provide a substantial area of engagement therewith. The concave surface 71 is preferably of the same radius as the ball. 7

The ball can be secured within the case 11 by raising the shelf 57, positioning the ball on the ring 35 of the base 13, and then lowering the shelf 57 so that the concave surface 71 engages the ball. Cooperation of the ring 35 and the surface 71 then serve to maintain the ball securely in place. v 7

Once the shelf 57 has been lowered to a position overlying and engaging the ball and the case 11 is closed, subsequent upward pivotal movement of the shelf as would permit dislodgement of the ball is prevented by interengagement of the lip of the side wall 63 and the side wall 17 of the closure shell 27, which engagement is facilitated by the inward tapering of the side walls of the case. Also, as can be seen in FIGURE 3, when the case is in the closed position, the lip of the side wall 63 becomes positioned between a pair of the ribs or corrugations 43 of the side wall and the shelf is thus further prevented from upward movement.

Closing of the case 11 therefore serves to lock the shelf 57in the horizontal position and prevent dislodgement of the ball from the ring 35. The ball is thus secured and will not roll or otherwise move about within 11 in overlying relation to the ball and engagesaid two shell portions in closed the case while the case is being transported. In addition, the shelf 57 serves as a convenient storage rack for shoes or other bowling accessories.

The bowling case thus provided is advantageous over those previously available in several other respects. Although formed of a relatively rigid material such as a molded plastic and thus providing substantial protection to the ball, the case can be opened to a position in which the ball and contents are readily accessible and easily visible. The case itself is of a sturdy construction, with the weight of the ball distributed throughout the shell of the case, and with theload-bearing base effectively supported by the side and end walls. The contents of the case are protected from the Weather, and dust, etc., by the cooperation of border flanges on each half of the case, and means are provided for supporting in a protected condition various accessories which might be used by the bowler.

Although shown and described with reference to a particular structure, it is apparent that various modifications and changes might be made in'the above described embodiment without departing from the principles of the invention.

Various of the features of in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A carrying case for a bowling ball comprising a pair of separable sections movable relative to one another be tween a closed position in which they define an inner compartment larger than a bowling ball and an open position permittingaccess to the inner compartment and removal of the ball therefrom, one of said sections defining a fiat base portion provided with a seating means for receiving the ball, and a shelf within said case adapted to overlie the ball so as to limit the movement of the ball and maintain the ball on the seating means when said case is in said closed position but being selectively movable independently of the relative movement of the sections to an out-of-the-way position to facilitate removal of the ball after said case has been opened, said shelf being engageable with a portion of a wall of said case when said case is closed so as to become locked in said overlying position.

2. A carrying case for a bowling ball comprising a substantially rigid, hollow shell enclosing a space larger than the ball, said shell including a flat base having an upstanding annular ring on which the ball is positioned, means Within said case defining a supporting surface extending in overlying relation to said ball, said means being engageable with the upper surface of the ball so as to limit movement thereof and maintain ring, said surface-defining means being supported within said case so as to occupy said overlying position when said case is opened, said surface-defining means being engageable with a portion of said shell when said case is closed so as to becomelocked in said overlying position but being selectively movable to an out-of-the-way position when said case is open to facilitate removal of the ball from the case, said shell being divided into two mating portions along a plane extending diagonally from one side of the base to the opposite upper side of the shell, said two shell portions being hinged together at said side edge of the base, fastening means for maintaining relationship, and a carrythe invention are set forth ing handle at the top of the case.

3. A carrying case for a bowling ball comprising a substantially rigid,.hollow shell enclosing a space larger than'the ball, said shell including a base having an upstanding annular ring on which the ball is positioned, a shelf pivotally mounted within the casein vertically spaced relation to said base and movable between a first position wherein said shelf is disposed to limit movement of the ball and prevent dislodgement thereof from said ring, and a second position wherein said shelf permits insertion and removal of the ball from a seated position on said ring,

the ball on said.

said shell being divided into two mating portions along a plane extending diagonally from one side of the base to the opposite upper side of the shell, said two shell portions being hinged together at the side edge of the base, a wall of said case including means engageable with the free edge of said pivoted shelf to maintain said shelf in said first position when said case is closed, fastening means for maintaining said two shell portions in closed relationship, and a carrying handle at the top of the case.

4. A carrying case for a bowling ball comprising a substantially rigid, hollow shell enclosing a space larger than the ball, said shell including a base having an upstanding annular ring on which the ball is positioned, a shelf pivotally mounted within said case in overlying relation to said annular ring and including a downwardly facing concave surface positioned thereon in position for engagement with the upper surface of the ball, said shelf being movable between a first position wherein said concave surface is disposed to engage the ball and limit movement thereof so as to prevent dislodgement of the ball from said ring, and a second position wherein said shelf permits insertion and removal of the ball from a seated position on said ring, said shell being dimensioned so as to provide space above said shelf for disposition of bowling accessories thereon and being divided into two mating portions along a plane extending diagonally from one side of the base to the opposite upper side of the shell, said two shell portions being thinged together at said side edge of the base, fastening means for maintaining said two shell portions in closed relationship, means extending inwardly from a wall of said case for engaging said shelf and maintaining it in said first position when said case is closed, and a carrying handle at the top of the case.

5. A carrying case for a bowling ball comprising a substantially rigid, hollow shell having a base, side walls, end walls, and a top wall enclosing a space larger than the ball, said base having an upstanding annular ring on which the ball is positioned, a shelf pivotally mounted within said case in overlying relation to said annular ring and including a downwardly facing concave surface positioned thereon in position for engagement with the upper surface of the ball and an upwardly projecting edge wall at opposite ends thereof, each of said edge walls being pivotally connected adjacent its upper edge to an end wall of said case so as to be movable in an are between a first position wherein said concave surface engages the ball and limits movement thereof so as to prevent dislodgement of the ball from said ring and a second position wherein said shelf permits insertion and removal of the ball from the case, said shell being dimensioned so as to provide space above saidshelf for disposition of bowling accessories thereon and being divided into two mating portions along a plane extending diagonally from one side of the base to the :opposite upper side of the shell, said two shell portions being hinged together at said side edge of the base, fastening means for maintaining said two shell portions in closed relationship, means extending inwardly from a wall of said case for engaging said shelf and maintaining it in said first position when said case is closed, and a carrying handle at the top of the case.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,238,074 Labadie et al Aug. 21, 1917 1,908,178 Plotkin May 9, 1933 1,950,242 Hollingshead Mar. 6, 1934 2,872,029 Cart Feb. 3, 1959 2,922,453 Le Golf Jan. 26, 1960 2,991,859 Kaplan July 11, 1961 3,029,855 Telford Apr. 17, 1962 3,080,951 Kaufman Mar. 12, 1963

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1238074 *Apr 19, 1916Aug 21, 1917State Of William SchweitzerLuncheon-case and the like.
US1908178 *Jun 23, 1930May 9, 1933Dresner & Son Inc STraveling case
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US2872029 *May 9, 1957Feb 3, 1959Cart Theodore SBowling ball bag
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3220520 *Oct 15, 1963Nov 30, 1965Glantz Samuel NBowling ball case
US3308911 *Aug 24, 1966Mar 14, 1967Dumpy Company IncEnd loading and unloading bowling ball carrier
US3313382 *May 3, 1965Apr 11, 1967Samsonite CorpLuggage case
US3347346 *Dec 20, 1965Oct 17, 1967A & J Mfg Company Ind IncAttache case-portable bar combination
US3391765 *Jun 17, 1966Jul 9, 1968Arvin Ind IncCase construction
US3430799 *Aug 31, 1966Mar 4, 1969Maier WilliamElectrical junction boxes
US4311223 *Mar 19, 1980Jan 19, 1982Stebco Industries, Inc.Bowling bag
US4553667 *Dec 27, 1983Nov 19, 1985Hudson John EBowling ball carrying container
US4621404 *Aug 12, 1985Nov 11, 1986Browning Arthur JProcess for making molded wheeled luggage
US4638910 *Sep 20, 1984Jan 27, 1987Sani-Fresh International, Inc.Cleaning wand caddy
US4779794 *Oct 30, 1987Oct 25, 1988Moore Gail SSpherical laundry basket
US5117980 *Nov 13, 1990Jun 2, 1992Ionides Christos GDrinking device and holder
US5894951 *May 19, 1997Apr 20, 1999Hunt; RicardoBasketball storage device
US6732880 *Sep 27, 2002May 11, 2004Franklin Delano Nash, Sr.Nash trash can 2(NTC2)/trash and storage receptacle
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/315.9, 220/4.22, 220/553, 206/315.91
International ClassificationA63B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B47/007
European ClassificationA63B47/00L