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Publication numberUS3137537 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 16, 1964
Filing dateNov 4, 1960
Priority dateNov 4, 1960
Also published asDE1440748A1
Publication numberUS 3137537 A, US 3137537A, US-A-3137537, US3137537 A, US3137537A
InventorsJudson C Cole, James R Hall
Original AssigneeBendix Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Separable connector for flat multipleconductor cables
US 3137537 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 16, 1964 J. c. coLE ETAL 3,137,537

SEPARABLE CONNECTOR FOR FLAT MULTIPLE-CONDUCTOR CABLES Filed Nov. 4, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS JUDSON C. COLE 9| JAMES R. HALL 71?- i k www ATTOR YS June 16, 1964 J. c. COLE ETAL 3,137,537

SEPARABLE CONNECTOR FOR FLAT MULTIPLE-CONDUCTOR CABLES Filed Nov. 4, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TORS United States Patent C 3,137,537 SEPARABLE CQNNECTOR FOR FLAT MULTIPLE- CONDUCTR CABLES Judson C. Cole and James R. Hall, Sidney, N.Y., assignors to The Bendix Corporation, Sidney, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed Nov. 4, 1960, Ser. No. 67,275 7 Claims. (Cl. 339-176) This invention relates to a separable electrical connector and in the embodiment thereof illustrated herein particularly relates to a separable connector for cables in attened, tape form.

The invention has among its objects the provision of a novel separable connector for multiple-conductor cables.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an improved separable electrical connector which may be used to advantage with multiple-conductor cables of the flat or tape type.

Yet another object of the invention lies in the provision of a separable connector of the type indicated, such -connector being characterized by the positiveness of electrical connection between mating contact portions of the connector.

Still a further object of the invention lies in the provision of a separable electrical connector which is particularly adapted for use with a rigid circuit element such as a board containing a printed circuit.

A still further object of the invention lies in the provision of a separable electrical connector which is rugged and compact, wherein the mating contacts make secure electrical contact with each other despite long use under rigorous conditions and despite repeated engagement of the connector parts with each other and repeated disengagement of such parts, and which does not add appreciably to the weight of an assembly with which it is used.

The above and further objects and novel features of the invention will more fully appear from the following description when the same is read in connection with the accompanying drawings. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawings are for the purpose of illustration only and are not intended as a definition of the limits of the invention.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views,

FIG. l is a view in longitudinal section of a first connector part in accordance with the invention, such first connector part being adapted to receive an element such vas a printed circuit board and to provide for electrical connection to a second connector part;

FIG. 2 is a view in front end elevation of the connector part shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a View in longitudinal section of a second part of a separable electrical connector, such second part being adapted to interfit with the first connector part shown in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a view in front end elevation of the second connector part;

FIG. 5 is a view in longitudinal section through an assembly of the first and second connector parts positioned in operative mating relationship, a printed circuit board being shown operatively engaged in the first connector part and such assembly;

FIG. 6 is an exploded fragmentary view in perspective of the assembly of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a view in longitudinal section through an alternative single-ended connector part in accordance with the invention; and

FIG. 8 is a view in longitudinal section through a second alternative double-ended connector part made in accordance with the invention.

Patented June 16, 1964 In the embodiments shown in the drawings,the separable connector of the invention is shown employed with a multiple conductor cable of the flattened or tape type. Whereas the connector of the invention displays perhaps its maximum advantages when used with such type of cable, it is to be understood that the connector of the invention may also be used advantageously with cables of other types.

In FIG. 1 there is shown a first connector part, generally designated 10, which is designed for use with an assembly such as that shown in FIG. 5. In such assembly the rear (right hand) end of connector part 10 matingly interfits with a second connector part 11 to which is connected a flattened multiple conductor cable V13. Connector part 10 is shown mounted upon and extending through a panel 12, which may be the wall of a circuit-containing enclosure. The forward (left hand) end of connector part 10 is shown in the assembly as receiving and making electrical contact with a flat circuit element such as a printed circuit board 14.

Turning now to FIGS. 1 and 2, it will be seen that the first connector part 10 has an outer shell or housing 15 having a forward end portion 16 of larger transverse dimensions and a smaller rear portion 17. Portions 16 and 17 of the shell are connected by a smoothly curved necked-in portion 19. A flange 20 is connected to shell portion 16 adjacent the rear end thereof so that the shell can be attached to a partition 12 in the manner shown in FIG. 5.

A rubber or rubber-like electrically insulating insert 21 fits snugly within the shell 15 so as to form a seal therewith. Insert 21 is accurately positioned within and retained from withdrawal from the shell by having an outwardly projecting boss 24 on the forward portion 22 of the insert interfitting within a hole 25 in the forward end of the shell. The insert is further retained within the shell by a second boss 27 on the rear insert portion 26, boss 27 projecting outwardly within a hole 29 in the rear end of the shell. When the insert is so held, the intermediate curved portion 30 thereof snugly engages the inner surface of the curved portion 19 of the shell.

The forward portion 22 of insert 21 has a longitudinally extending opening 31 therein, opening 31 being designed to receive a portion of printed circuit board 14 and also to position upper and lower contact fingers 35 and 36 making electrical contact with the various contacts on element 14. The rear portion 26 of the insert has a laterally elongated recess or pocket 32, such recess containing a plurality of laterally spaced contact lingers 34, each of which is integral with 'one of contact fingers 35 and 36, as the case may be. Opening 31, in the embodiment shown, has a height, that is, a dimension transverse to its length and lying in the plane of the paper in FIG. 1, which is markedly greater than that of recess 32.

The spring contact fingers 34 are integral with the respective upper and lower spring fingers 35 and 36. Such integral contacts are in the form of at wires made, for example, of beryllium-copper alloy, and are retained in an electrically insulating block 37 made, for example, of plastic material which extends from side to side of connector part 10. The conductor wires may be molded in place within mounting block 37 and may have la short bent portion 39 lying within the block in order with a plurality of laterally spaced longitudinally extending grooves 42, 44 on the inner wall thereof. As shown in FIG. 2, upper grooves 42 and lower grooves 44 are .laterally spaced. The forward ends of the conductors 32, .3.5 project through an'opening at the forward end of seat 3`and then extend angularly upwardly in a run 40. Forwardlyv of` run Vlltlmthe conductor extends longitudinally of connector part '10 for a, substantial distance along the bottom of groove`42, 4following which it is bent downwardly at a relatively shallow angle to form the forward, active portions 35 of the contacts. The extreme forward .ends of contacts 35 are bent upwardly and then rearwardly s o that preferably, when in the relaxed condition shown .inlFlG. 1, at least the upper ends of such upwardly and rearwardly bent portions of` contacts 35 lie within the grooves 42. The portions of the conductors forming the lowercontacts36 are similarly bent, but in reverse direc- Vtionsnfrom those ofthe upper contacts. Thus upon leavin g the seat 38 'the forward ends of the conductors forming the lower contacts are bent downwardly angularly in runs 41, from which the conductors lie along the bottoms of grooves -4,4 for an appreciable distance. Forwardly of such straight portions the conductors are bent shallowly angularly upwardly to form the active contact portions 436, the forward ends of such contacts being bent downwardlyand then rearwardly so that at least a portion of Veach of the forward'ends of the lower conductors lie within grooves 44. v i Y Y Y l Contacts 35 and`36 cooperate with a circuit element lsuchas a printed circuit board'14 in the manner more clearly shown in FIG. Board V14A has a body 45 made, for example, of reinforced electrically insulating plastic material. vThe body 45 has a thickness which closely Lcoi'rrorrns to the vertical dimension of the recess 31 in the forward end of insulating sheath 21, so that the body 45 may Vbe snugly received within such recess. Body 45 has a plurality Lof laterally spaced vupper and lower bared contact ribbons .or contacts 46 and 4 9, respectively, thereon, vthe upper and lower, contacts alternating in a lateral direction soY as to `ov`e`rliev and make contact with the upper andlow'er uContact fingers 35 and 36. The contacts 46 and 49 are in 'the forni of electrically conducting strips,

sufch strips. being secured to body 45as by being adhesivelybo'nded thereto. Strips 46 and 49 lead to various circuitfelelnents (not shown) included on the circuit b'oard l14. The rear edge lof the circuit board shown has .a portion 51 of reduced width which conforms to the 'vyidthfof recess 31 in connector part 10 so that portion Q51 `may be received an Yappreciable distance within recess Y "Connector part 11, designed for'cooperation with the rear end portion `ofthe above described connector part f1.0-, is 'shown more particularly in FIGS. 3 and 4. As `there shown, connector part 11 has an Outer shell or housing l52, which may be made, for example, of metal. ',In1 the embodiment shown shell 52is made in two parts,

there being a first, forward portion 54 and a second, rear Vlt'wverwaills offsheath 56. The forward end of the recess within sheath 56 has upper and lower flared or tapered Azones 59 which are adapted sealingly to engage the end portion '66 ofthe sheath which projects rearwardly of the shellof'connector part 10.

The insert 57 is of such length that its forward end lies somewhat rearwardly of the forward end of shell portion :54. The :upperandlower inner walls of shell portion 54 ,are spaced somewhat from insert 57 to provide recesses 60 which receive the Vrear end of 'the shell Vof connector part 10. VThe upper and lower surfaces of insert 57 are provided with alternating grooves, the grooves in the upper surface of the insert, shown at 61, sloping forwardly and downwardly from an intermediate zone of the insert, and the grooves on the lower surface of the insert, not specifically shown, slanting forwardly and upwardly. A conductor tape or foil, shown at 62 in FIG. 3, is secured to the bottom of the groove 61; a tape or foil is similarly secured to the bottom of each of the grooves in the lower surface of the insert. The forward ends 64 of the grooves in the upper surface of the insert lie adjacent the lower forward edge of the insert, and the forward ends of the grooves in the lower surface of the insert lie adjacent the upper forward corners of the insert. The described con struction of the insert androf the upper and lower grooves therein provide a plurality of vertically extending partitions, one between each pair of the grooves.

Theimultiple conductor cable, generally designated 13, has a plurality of thin, ribbon-like conductor stripswhich are scaled in spaced parallel relationship between `upper Vand lower insulating layers to form an insulating body. Such cable may be, for example, one manufactured by the Tape Cable Company, Rochester, New York; a typical one of such cables employs conductors made of thin copper strips and a body made of clear, transparent thermoplastic material such as a polyester resin.

As shown in FIG. 3, the insulation is removed from the forward edge of the cable 13 and alternate bared c'onductors of the cable are bent upwardly and downwardly to overlie the rear edge of the respective conductor strips "or foils on insert 57. The conductors may be secured as vforward end of connector part 11, the'rear end `66 ofthe sheath of connector part 10 snugly and sealingly fitting 'within the forward 'ared portion 59 of fshe'ath 56.- A 'peripherally extending bead A67 is 'preferably divided 'on sheath portion'o, such bead being deformed upon 'assem bly, as shown, whereby Ito insure the formation of a seal betweensheaths 66'and l56. When connector portions 10 and 11 are telescopically engaged, the rear ends of spring contact lingers l34 initiallyenter'freely within the upper and lower grooves on insert l57, sincethe forward ends of such grooves lie well beyond thevertical center of the insert and thus of the relaxed position of fingers 34.

"When, however, parts 10 and -11 are vadvanced toward fully mating position, the forwardends of contact'lingers 34engagethe contact strips on the bottoms of fthe grooves in insert 57, and aref progressively llexed either upwardly or downwardly from their relaxed positions, whereby to make secure electrical contact with the conductor strips.

To insure that parts 10 and 11"will remain in fully -engaged position, there is provided a fla-nge`69 on vtheforward end of shell 54 and there 'is provided a similar flange 70 on the'rearend -of shell portion-'17 of connector part 10. VSuch flanges vat -le'ast substantiallyabut when the connector parts are fu-lly engaged, Vand may be held in such condition by bolts, not shown, extending through 'holes in the two flanges.

To insure that the connector parts may be assembled only in 'the correct position, there are provided orrienting formations on the shells. of the Vrespective connector Vparts. In 'the embodiment jshown, 'such formations take the form wof aproject-iori 71 in the forward endY of Shell'54, -a slot ployed to cooperate and -intert With'fthefconnector -part 11 shown in FIG. 3.

In FIG. 7 a multi-conductor attened cable 79 is shown connected to the contacts of connector part 80. The connector part has a strong rigid shell 81 having an outwardly directed fiange 82 thereupon for cooperation, for example, with a tiange such as shown at 69 in FIG. 3. Connector part 80 has a rubber-like electrically insulating sheath 84 snugly and sealingly engaged therewithin, such sheath having an elongated recess within the rear end thereof. Rearwardly directed Contact fingers, of which one is shown at 85, extend rearwardly within such recess. The forward ends of the contact fingers are secured within a strong rigid electrically insulating insert 86 as by being molded therewithin. Preferably the portion of the conductor finger within the insert block is diverted as shown to provide a strong mechanical connection therewith. In the embodiment shown, the diversion of the contact fingers is such as to expose alternate fingers 0n the upper and lower surfaces of the insert block, respectively, whereby to permit connection between the conductors of the cable and the contact fingers as by soldered joints, of which one at the upper surface of the insert is shown at 83, and another of which, shown at the lower surface of the insert, is designated 86.

In FIG. 8 there is shown a further alternative connector part 89 in accordance with the invention. Connector part 89, which is double-ended, may, for example, be employed with two connector parts such as that shown at 11 in FIG. 3.

Connector part 89 has a strong rigid shell 90 within which is securely and sealingly fitted a rubber-like electrically insulating sheath 91. A strong rigid electrically insulating insert 92 is snugly engaged within a seat in sheath 91, preferably being snapped therein before assembly of the sheath within the shell. An integral conductor 94, made of springy metal such as beryllium-copper, has its central portion mounted within insert block 92 and its opposite, contact finger-forming end portions 95 and 96 projecting longitudinally within elongated recesses at the opposite ends of the sheath 91. Shell 90 carries two peripherally extending flanges 97, 99 which are adapted to interact with anges such as that shown at 69 in FIG. 3, whereby to retain two connector parts 11 in operative engagement with the opposite ends of connector part 89.

Although only a limited number of embodiments of the invention have been illustrated in the accompanying drawings and described in the foregoing specification, it is to be especially understood that various changes, such as in the relative dimensions of the parts, materials used, and the like, as well as the suggested manner of use of the apparatus of the invention, may be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as will now be apparent to those skilled in the art.

What is claimed is:

l. A separable electrical connector comprising an elongated electrically insulating sheath, an electrically insulating insert block positioned in the sheath intermediate the ends of the sheath, the sheath presenting open ended recesses having two opposite broad walls receiving contacts of other connector parts on opposite sides of the block, a first one of said recesses having a markedly greater height than the second recess, and an elongated spring member affixed intermediate its length to the block generally centrally of the thickness of the latter, opposite ends of the spring member projecting into the respective recesses in the sheath and forming contact fingers for engagement by said contacts of said other connector parts, the contact finger in a first recess being bent to lie with its outer end lying nearer one broad wall of the recess than the other, the contact finger in the second recess lying generally axially of such second recess.

2. A separable electrical connector comprising a first connector part having an elongated electrically insulating resilient sheath, a rigid shell intimately surrounding and confining the sheath, means retaining the sheath within the shell, an electrically insulating elongated insert block positioned in the sheath intermediate the ends of lthe sheath, the sheath presenting elongated open ended recesses on opposite sides of the block, a plurality of spaced elongated parallel spring members affixed intermediate their ends to the block, opposite ends of the spring members projecting into the respective recesses in the sheath and forming contact fingers, the fingers in one recess lying with the outer free ends thereof disposed adjacent a plane equidistant from the opposite walls of said one recess, and a second connector part adapted to be received within said one recess of the first connector part, said second connector part comprising an insulating board having a forward edge portion adapted to be received within the said one recess of the first connector part, and a plurality o-f longitudinally extending spaced parallel conductors on the board adapted to make electrical contact with the contact fingers in the said one recess of the first connector part, there being inclined staggered grooves in the opposite faces of the forward edge of the board, lthe spaced parallel conductors being disposed at theV bottoms of the grooves in the board, the grooves being of such widths as to receive the contact fingers located in said one recess of the first connector part when the forward edge portion of the board is mounted in said one recess.

3. An electrical connector as defined in claim 2 wherein the contact fingers in the other of said recesses in the first connector part lie with the outer free ends o-f sucoessive fingers disposed adjacent the opposite walls of said other recess, comprising a third connector part comprising an insulating plate having a forward edge portion adapted to be received within said other recess of the first connector part, and a plurality of longitudinally extending spaced parallel conductive strips on opposite faces of said plate adapted to make electrical contact with the contact fingers in said other recess of the rst connector part, the conductive strips on one said face being in staggered relation to the said conductive strips on the other said face, whereby the said strips on opposite faces of the plate make contact with alternate contact fingers in said other recess when the forward edge portion of the plate is mounted in said other recess.

4. A separable electrical connector comprising an elongated electrically insulating sheath, an electrically insulating insert block positioned in the sheath intermediate the ends of the sheath, the sheath presenting open ended recesses having two opposite broad walls receiving contacts of other connector parts on opposite sides of the block, and an elongated spring member affixed intermediate its length to the block generally centrally of the thickness of the latter, opposite ends of the spring member projecting into the respective recesses in the sheath and forming contact fingers for engagement by said contacts of said other connector parts, the contact finger in a first recess being bent to lie with its outer end lying nearer one broad wall of the recess than the others, the contact finger in the second recess lying generally axially of such second recess.

5. A separable electrical connector comprising an elongated electrically insulating sheath of extended width, an electrically insulating insert block of' extended width positioned in the sheath intermediate the ends of the sheath, the sheath presenting open ended laterally elongated recesses having two opposite broad parallel walls receiving contacts of other connector parts on opposite sides of the block, a first one of said recesses having a markedly greater height than the second recess, a plurality of spaced parallel elongated spring members afiixed intermediate their length to the block generally centrally of the thickness of the latter, opposite ends of the spring members projecting into the respective recesses in the sheath and forming contact fingersl for engagement by said contacts of said other connector parts, the contact fingers in the first recess being bent to lie with their outer ends lying nearer one broad wall of the recess than the other, the

Contact lingers in the second recess lying generally axially of such second recess.

6. A separable electrical connector as claimed in claim 5, wherein the'inner surfaces of the opposite broad walls kol the lirst recess have longitudinally extending parallel grooves therein, the grooves in the opposite Walls being disposed in staggered relationship, and a substantial portion of the length of each of the contact lingers in the first recess lies Within its respective groove.

7. A separable electrical connector comprising a lirst connector part having an elongated electrically insulating resilient sheath, a rigid shell intimately surrounding and confining the sheath, means retaining the sheath within the shell, an electrically insulating elongated insert block p0- sitioned in the sheath intermediate the ends of the sheath, the sheath presenting elongated open ended recesses on opposite sides of the block, a plurality of spaced elongated parallel spring members aliixed intermediate their ends to the block, opposite ends of the spring members projecting into the respective recesses in the sheath and forming contact lingers, the lingers in one recess lying With the outer free ends of successive lingers disposed adjacent lthe opposite Walls of said recess, and a second connector part adapted to be received within said one recess of the lirst connector part, said second connector part comprising a plate-like insulating board having a forward edge portion adapted to be received within the said one recess of the first connector part, and a plurality of longitudinally extending spaced parallel conductors on oppositefaces of the board adapted to make electrical contact with the contact lingers in the said one recess of the first connector part, the said conductors on one said face being in staggered relation to the said conductors on the other said face, whereby said conductors on oppositefaces ofsaid board engage alternate Contact lingers in said one recess when the forward edge .portion of the board is mounted in said one recess.

References Cited in the iile of this .patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,383,926 White Allg, 28, 1945 2,732,534 Giel Jan. 24, 1956 i 2,804,601 Harthman et al. Allg. 27 19,57 2,892,991 Beebe et al. June 30, 1959 2,924,808 Hewes et al. Feb. 9, 119,60 2,935,725 Fox c May 3, 1960 3,017,602 Little ,.--g Ian. 1 6, 1,962 3,089,114 Cole et al. May 7, 1,963

FOREIGN PATENTS 1,004,488l France Nov. 28, 1951

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US3184707 *Sep 23, 1963May 18, 1965Sperry Rand CorpUniversal receptacle shell coding device
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Classifications
U.S. Classification439/493, 439/638, 439/636
International ClassificationH01R13/502, H01R12/18, H01R12/26, H01R12/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01R12/79, H01R23/70
European ClassificationH01R23/66F, H01R23/70