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Publication numberUS3138388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1964
Filing dateOct 6, 1961
Priority dateOct 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3138388 A, US 3138388A, US-A-3138388, US3138388 A, US3138388A
InventorsHerold Charles C
Original AssigneeHerold Charles C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for coordinating the pivotal movement of a golfer's shoulders and hips
US 3138388 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1964 HEROLD 3,138,388

C. C. DEVICE FOR COORDINATING THE PIVOTAL MOVEMENT Filbd Oct. 6, 1961 OF A GOLFER'S SHOULDEIRS AND HIPS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 1

I 276 a (/2 v INVENTOR. UA/QELFS a HEEOZ-Q June 23, 1964 c. c. HEROLD DEVICE FOR COORDINATING THE PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF A GOLFER'S SHOULDERS AND HIPS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed 001:. 6, 1961 FIG. 11.

INVENTOR. CA/A E6 C. #63040,

A? 7' OE/V5545 United States Patent 3,138,388 DEVICE FOR COORDINATING THE PIVOTAL MOVEMENT OF A GOLFERS SHOULDERS AND HIPS Charles C. Herold, 10220' SW. 160 St., Miami, Fla. Filed Oct. 6, 1961, Ser. No. 143,334 6 Claims. (Cl. 273-183) This invention relates to the general field of athletics and, more specifically, the instant invention pertains to apparatus for the training of a golf player.

As every player of golf is well aware, stance and the movement of the body and its appendages must be coordinated in order to properly strike the object ball with a selected club, else the impact of the club head on the ball will cause the latter to slice, hook, be topped, or undercut. The players arms, shoulders, torso, hips and legs must move in coordination to achieve a satisfactory stroke. To this end the present invention is directed.

One of the most diificult phases of the golf game resides in a players mastery of the use of clubs generally classified as woods and irons. In using such clubs, the player normally addresses the ball, after which the club is swung upwardly over the shoulders and subsequently downwardly to cause impact of the golf club head with the golf or object ball. Most of the human errors, leading to a poorly hit ball, occur during the downswing. Many players, even after having developed a smooth, rythmical swing, have a tendency to draw the club inwardly as the club head approaches the ball. Other players tend to chop at the ball. Other irregularities occur in the downswing of even the most experienced of players. Regardless of the age, weight and strength of the player these, as well as other improper body movements, result in inaccurate shots with, of course, the attendant increase in score.

In accordance with the present-day techniques for playing an iron or wood shot, it is understood that the shoulders, torso, hips and legs pivot during the upswing. During the downswing most players tend to turn their shoulders well in advance of pivoting their hips and legs in the reverse direction and, consequently, the ball, thus, is struck inwardly with respect to the player if, indeed, the ball is struck at all.

The instant invention is designed to aiford the user apparatus which will tend to overcome the swinging defects on the downstroke of a golf shot. As such, the instant invention has, as one of the primary objects thereof, the provision of apparatus to train or guide a golf player to perfect the downswing portion of a golf stroke.

Another object of this invention is to provide apparatus of the type described which is bodily actuated.

A further object of this invention is to provide a bodilyactuated golf swing practice or training device for correcting a golf players downswing, the device being adapted for use indoors or outdoors.

Still another object of this invention is to provide apparatus for guiding the backswing of a golf player, the apparatus including body-engaging elements movable with the player if the swing is correct, the elements being nonmovable in the presence of an improper swing.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of a golf swing practice device which includes normally movable body-engaging elements when the swing is correct, the elements becoming nonmovable to inhibit body movement when the golf swing is incorrect.

Other and further objects and advantages of the instant invention will become'more manifest from a consideration of the following specification when read in conjunction with the annexed drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a top plan view of the golf swing guide apparatus constructed in accordance with this invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of the apparatus shown in FIGURES 1 and 2;

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary detail crosssectional view, FIGURE 4 being taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 44 of FIGURE 3, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 5 is a detail cross-sectional view, FIGURE 5 being taken substantially on the inclined plane of line 5-5 of FIGURE 4, looking in the direction of the arrows, FIGURE 5 illustrating a pair of component elements of this invention held in their respective locked positions by a ratchet and pawl mechanism;

FIGURE 6 is a detail cross-sectional view, FIGURE 6 being taken substantially on the horizontal plane of line 66 of FIGURE 4, looking in the direction of the arrows, FIGURE 6 showing the pawl-operating means in its locked position;

FIGURE 7 is a detail cross-sectional view similar to FIGURE 6, FIGURE 7 showing the pawl-actuating mechanism in its unlocked position;

FIGURE 8 is a detail cross-sectional view similar to FIGURE 5, showing the pawl-actuating mechanism in its unlocked position; and

FIGURES 9, 10 and 11 illustrating the operation of the device of the instant invention through three positions of a golfers swing.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings, reference numeral 10 designates, in general, a golf swing guide apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of the instant invention.

' The golf swing guide apparatus is seen to comprise an elongated substantially rectangular platform 12 having a longitudinally-extending triangular base 14 projecting from one end thereof.

Reference numeral 16 designates a hollow tubular element having a circumferential flange 18 bolted as at 20 to the base 14 adjacent the apex thereof. The tubular element 16 extends vertically and has telescoped in the upper end thereof a second hollow tubular element 22. The tubular elements 16, 22 are held in vertically-adjusted relation relative to each other by means of a wing bolt 24 which is threaded through the tubular element 16 for engagement with the tubular element 22. The upper end of the tubular element 22 is collapsed at 25 to form a flat face having radially-extending ratchet teeth 26. Reference numeral 28 denotes a relatively short hollow tubular elbow connector having a lower flattened end 30 formed with radially-extending ratchet teeth 32 adapted to mate with the ratchet teeth 26 when superimposed thereagainst. With the ratchet teeth 26 juxtaposed with respect to the teeth 32, the elbow 28 is held in adjusted relation relative to the tubular element 22 by means of a bolt 34 which passes through the centers of the radial ratchet teeth 26, 32, and a wing nut 36.

To serve a function to be described, the lower end of the elbow 28 has a circumferential collar 38 telescoped thereon and being rotatable relative thereto. A set screw 40 is threaded through the collar 38 to hold the collar against inadvertent rotary or axial movement. The collar 38 is also provided with a plurality of transverselyextending, circumferentially-spaced cylindrical pin-receiving openings 41 in one of which is selectively disposed a limit pin 42.

A second collar 44 is telescoped over the lower end of the elbow 28 and is superimposed on the collar 38. The collar 44 is rotatable about the elbow 28 and rides on the collar 38 as it turns. A stop pin 46 is threaded into the collar 44 and projects radially therefrom. As is clearly seen in FIGURE 6, the limit pin 42 is disposed in the path of movement of the stop pin 46 and thereby limits the rotation of the collar 44.

The inner side of the collar 44 is formed with an arcuately-shaped cam slot 48 that normally faces an aperture 50 formed in the lower end of the elbow 28 (see FIGURES 4, 6 and 7). One end of a lever 52 normally extends through the aperture 50, and is releasably received within the cam slot 48. The other end of the lever 52 is bifurcated at 54 and receives therein the lower end of a bell-crank lever 56 that is pivotally connected thereto by a pivot pin 58. The bell-crank lever 56 is pivotally mounted, intermediate its ends, on a pivot pin 60, the latter extending diametrically across the elbow 28 substantially centrally thereof and having its opposed ends fixedly secured thereto. The other end of the bellcrank lever 56 extends into the upper end of the elbow 28 and is pivotally connected by a pin 62 to the bifurcated end 64 of a pawl 66. The other end of the pawl 66 is mounted for reciprocation through an aperture 68 formed in the upper end of the elbow 28.

A collar 70 having a plurality of circumferentiallyspaced, transversely-extending cylindrical openings 72 formed therein to receive, selectively, a limit pin 74, is telescoped over the upper end of the elbow 28 and is rotatable thereon. The collar 70 is held against rotation in an adjusted position on the elbow 28 by means of a set screw 76.

The enlarged end 78 of an elongated substantially hollow tubular member 80 is telescoped over the upper end of the elbow 28 and bears against the collar 70. One end of a stop pin 81 is threaded in the end 78 and is adapted to engage the limit pin 74. The hollow tubular member 80 is rotatable on the elbow 28, and the inner side thereof is formed with a ratchet slot 82 which normally confronts the aperture 68 and receives the free end of the pawl 66 therein.

A spring seat 84 is formed in the inner side of the upper end of the elbow 28 and holds one end of a helicoidal spring 86 under compression, the other end of the spring 86 surrounding a spring keeper pin 87 which projects laterally from the upper end of the lever 56. The keeper pin 87 constantly tends to guide the aforementioned other end of the spring into engagement with the upper end of the bell-crank lever 56. Thus, the lever 56 is constantly biased for pivotal movement in a clockwise direction, reference being made to FIGURE 4 of the drawings.

One end of a rod 88 is telescoped into the tubular member 80 and is fixedly secured thereto. The other end of the rod 88 is threaded to receive a number of convolutions of a helicoidal spring 90 thereon. The convolutions of the spring 90 at the other end thereof are threaded on the threaded end of a similar rod 92 which is telescoped within one end of a tubular member 94. The adjacent ends of the rods 88, 92 are spaced from one another, and the construction is such as to provide a semi-rigid connection between the tubular members 80 and 94. The tubular member 94 is held in adjusted relation relative to the rod 92 by means of a wing bolt 96, and a shoulderengaging, substantially rectangular bar 97 is rigidly connected, intermediate its ends, to the upper end of the tubular member 94.

A rod 98 has one of its ends threaded into the collar 44 diametrically of the pin 46, the other end of the rod 98 being threaded to receive some of the convolutions of a helicoidal spring 100 thereon. The other end of the spring 100 is threaded on one end of a rod 102. The construction between the adjacent ends of the rods is such as to afford a semi-rigid connection therebetween, the adjacent ends thereof being axially spaced from one another.

The other end of the rod 102 is connected by a screw 104 to a buttocks-engaging crossbar 106 intermediate the ends of the latter.

Having described this invention in detail, the following is a brief description of the operation of the apparatus 10.

Referring to the several figures of the drawings, the wing bolt 24 is first loosened to permit the tubular element 22 to be vertically adjusted relative to the tubular element 16 so as to position the crossbar 106 across the buttocks of the user (see FIGURE 9), and the bolt 24 is then thereafter tightened.

The angularity of the tubular members 80, 94 is adjusted through the simple expedient of loosening the wing nut 36 and adjusting the tubular members 80, 94 about the bolt 34 and then subsequently tightening the nut 36. The wing bolt 96 is loosened to permit axial and pivotal adjustment of the tubular member 94 relative to the rod 92 to fit the shoulder-engaging bar 97 against the users shoulders.

With these adjustments having been made, reference is now made to FIGURES 5, 6 and 10. The latter figure shows the position of the user at the top of his normal backswing with the hips and shoulders pivoted to the right. The free end of the lever 52 is now disposed in the cam slot 40 (see FIGURE 6) and the pawl 66 is engaged in the ratchet slot 82 (see FIGURE 5).

Now, as has been stated above, to make a proper wood or iron shot, the hips of the golfer should begin to pivot in a reverse direction prior to the initial movement of the shoulders. Thus, and reference is made to FIGURE 11, the hips have been moved in advance of the shoulders, and this motion is transmitted to the collar 44 which will then turn in a counterclockwise direction, causing the cam slot 48 to move past the lever 52 (see FIGURE 7), and to simultaneously press the same inwardly. This causes the lever 56 to pivot counterclockwise, reference being made to the dotted-line position thereof shown in FIGURE 4, with the attendant withdrawal of the pawl 66 from the ratchet slot 82 (see FIG- URE 8). This frees the tubular member for rotation about the upper end of the elbow 28 so that the natural downswing of the golfer may be completed.

In the event the hips do not pivot in advance of the shoulders, the tubular member 80 remains locked, since the pawl 66 remains within the ratchet slot 82, and pressure will be applied to the shoulders of the user, warning him of an impending incorrect swing. The helicoidal spring tends to absorb the force generated under the latter condition to prevent injury to the apparatus and physical injury to the user, should the tubular elements 80 and 94 be made without the semi-rigid connection.

The semi-rigid helicoidal spring also provides a connection which permits slight body movements to be absorbed therein without transmission to the collar 44 through inadvertence.

The stop pins 46, 81 cooperate with their respective limit pins 42, 74 to prevent excessive pivotal movement of the hips and shoulders as the golfer assumes the position shown in FIGURE 10.

In event the spacings of the openings 41, 72 do not provide fine enough adjustment for the pins 42, 74, the set screws 40, 76 may be loosened and the collars 38, 44, 70 rotated about the sleeve 28 until the desired position of the pins 42, 74 is obtained. The set screws are then re-tightened.

Having described and illustrated one embodiment of this invention, it will be understood that the same is offered merely by way of example, and that this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer, said apparatus comprising an upright element, shoulder-engaging means pivotally supported on said element, means on said element cooperating with means on said shoulder-engaging means to prevent the latter from pivoting at the top of the upswing and just prior to said downswing, and buttocks-actuated means responsive to the hip movement of said golfer, and connected with said cooperating means to permit the shoulder-engaging means to pivot in the event of actuation of said buttocks-actuated means in advance of said downswing.

2. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer, said apparatus comprising an upright element, an elbow connector having an end thereof connected to the upper end of said element, shoulder-engaging means pivotally supported on the other end of said elbow, means carried on said elbow cooperating with means on said shoulder-engaging means to prevent the latter from pivoting at the top of the upswing and just prior to said downswing, and buttocks-actuated means, responsive to the hip movement of said golfer, and connected with said cooperating means to permit the shoulder-engaging means to pivot in the event of actuation of said buttocks-actuated means in advance of said downswing.

3. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer, said apparatus comprising an upright element, an elbow connector having one end thereof connected to the upper end of said element, shoulder-engaging means pivotally supported on the other end of said elbow, a bell-crank level pivotally supported on said elbow, said bell-crank lever having one of its remotelydisposed ends releasably engaging said shoulder-engaging means to prevent pivotal movement of the latter relative to said bell-crank lever when said golfer has reached the top of the upswing and just prior to initiating said downswing, and buttocks-actuated means responsive to the hip movement of said golfer, said buttocks-actuated means being engageable with the other of said remotelydisposed ends of said bell-crank lever and operable to cause said bell-crank lever to pivot and move said one end out of engagement with said shoulder-engaging means prior to said downswing to free said shoulder-engaging means for pivotal movement in response to the shoulder movement of said golfer on said downswing.

4. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer, said apparatus comprising a normally horizontal platform, a hollow tubular element having an end thereof fixedly secured to said platform and projecting vertically away therefrom, a second hollow tubular element telescopically mounted within said first tubular element and vertically adjustable relative thereto, means for holding said second tubular element in adjusted relation relative to said first tubular element, a substantially hollow elbow connector, means pivotally connecting one end of said connector with the upper end of said second tubular element, a first elongated hollow tubular member having an end thereof telescoped over the other end of said elbow connector, said first hollow tubular member being rotatably supported on said other end of said elbow, a second hollow tubular member, said first and second hollow tubular members being normally co-axially aligned with adjacent ends thereof disposed in spaced relation relative to one another, resilient means interposed between and connecting said adjacent ends of said hollow tubular members, said elbow connector having an aperture formed in each of said one and said other of said ends thereof, a bell-crank lever disposed within said elbow connector, means supporting said bell-crank lever for pivotal movement intermediate the remotely-disposed ends thereof, a lever pivotally connected at one of its ends to one of said ends of said bell-crank lever, the other end of said lever projecting through said aperture formed in said one end of said elbow connector, said first tubular member having a ratchet slot formed on the inner side thereof adjacent said one end thereof, said slot normally being disposed in confronting relation relative to said aperture formed in said other end of said elbow connector, a pawl having an end thereof pivotally connected to the other end of said bell-crank lever, the other end of said pawl extending through said aperture formed in said other end of said elbow connector and into said slot to prevent rotation of said first tubular member relative to said other end of said elbow connector, means disposed within said elbow connector for constantly biasing said pawl for engagement within said slot, a collar mounted on said one end of said elbow connector and being rotatable thereabout, said collar having an arcuate slot formed on the inner side thereof adapted to receive said other end of said lever, a rod having one end thereof fixedly secured to said collar, a second rod co-axially aligned with said first rod, resilient means connecting the adjacent ends of said first and second rods, 2. buttocks-engageable bar connected to the free end of said second rod, and a shoulder-engaging bar fixedly secured to the remotely-disposed end of said second tubular member.

5. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer as defined in claim 4, and stop means mounted on said one end of said elbow connector adjacent said collar to limit the movement thereof in one direction.

6. Golf swing guide apparatus for guiding the downswing of a golfer as defined in claim 5, and stop means for limiting the rotation of said first tubular member relative to said other end of said elbow connector.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,611,610 Hara Sept. 23, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2611610 *May 16, 1950Sep 23, 1952Rikuo Hara JamesMechanical golf player's stance positioner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3350102 *Mar 23, 1965Oct 31, 1967Jr Frank M TiernanGolfer's head movement control device
US3397892 *Jul 2, 1965Aug 20, 1968Walter A. StahlGolf training aid
US3415524 *Jan 28, 1965Dec 10, 1968Robert M. VickersGolf swing training apparatus
US3767205 *Sep 28, 1971Oct 23, 1973Jankowski WGolfer{40 s head movement restraining device rendered non-restraining at ball impact position
US3861688 *Jun 6, 1973Jan 21, 1975Warren H ButlerGolf training device
US4318546 *Mar 16, 1981Mar 9, 1982Chien Chung ChenGolf club swing training device
US4993716 *Apr 20, 1990Feb 19, 1991Waller Malcolm CGolf stance alignment device
US5050885 *Nov 30, 1990Sep 24, 1991James Troy BallardGolf swing training apparatus
US5125663 *Mar 6, 1991Jun 30, 1992Lurowist Jr NicholasGolf swing training apparatus
US5203569 *Jan 16, 1992Apr 20, 1993Golf Research Technology CorporationGolf stance trainer
US5288074 *Mar 26, 1993Feb 22, 1994Scheurer Robert SGolfer's hip turn restrictor training aid
US5303926 *May 7, 1993Apr 19, 1994Owens Charles AMulti-use golf training device
US5334028 *Mar 12, 1993Aug 2, 1994Melligan Edmund JGolf swing training process
US5511789 *Feb 14, 1994Apr 30, 1996Nakamura; YoshikazuGolf swing training device
US6343998 *Oct 5, 1999Feb 5, 2002Joseph Leonard TarulliGolf swing practice apparatus
US6663512 *Jan 24, 2002Dec 16, 2003The Pitching Coach, LlcPitching coach
US6805641 *Oct 2, 2001Oct 19, 2004Shawn P. PopeGolf swing training apparatus, and method of using same
US7604547 *Jun 6, 2007Oct 20, 2009Biosport Technologies LlcGolf training device
US7641595 *Aug 2, 2005Jan 5, 2010Sharps Chester HGolf exercise device
US7641596 *Nov 3, 2006Jan 5, 2010Sharps Chester HGolf swing simulator and exercise device
US8016690Oct 19, 2009Sep 13, 2011Rushe Golf LlcGolf training device
US8088020 *Oct 12, 2010Jan 3, 2012Groves Scott DGolf swing training apparatus
US8715100Feb 6, 2013May 6, 2014Jeff PetroskeGolf swing snake training system
WO2007110682A1 *Mar 29, 2006Oct 4, 2007Grant SybilSwing cage
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/276
International ClassificationA63B69/36
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/3608
European ClassificationA63B69/36B