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Publication numberUS3138394 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 23, 1964
Filing dateSep 10, 1962
Priority dateSep 10, 1962
Also published asDE1490827B
Publication numberUS 3138394 A, US 3138394A, US-A-3138394, US3138394 A, US3138394A
InventorsKosrow Robert L
Original AssigneeUnion Special Machine Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of lacing bundles of strands
US 3138394 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 23, 1964 R. L. KOSROW 3,138,394

METHOD OF LACING BUNDLES OF STRANDS Filed Sept. 10, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l m N m m m w (\I 1 N m I f 9. LL.

Q NJ Q N I 9 1 LL m w N J j R. L. KOSROW INVENTOR 9 LL ATTORNEYS June 23, 1964 R. L. KOSROW 3,138,394

METHOD OF LACING BUNDLES OF STRANDS Filed Sept. 10, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 R. L. KOSROW INVENTOR ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,138,394 METHOD OF LACING BUNDLES OF STRANDS Robert L. Kosrow, Elk Grove Village, Ill., assignor to Union Special Machine Company, Chicago, Ill., a corporation of Illinois Filed Sept. 10, 1962, Ser. No. 222,723 6 Claims. (Cl. 239-45) The following specification relates to a novel method of lacing bundles of strands, such as insulated wires for telephone or electronic purposes, textile working and the like. The invention also includes an improved device by which the process may be carried out.

Numerous instances occur where it is necessary to assemble a considerable number of strands, wires and the like in compact bundles of minimum dimensions. As an example, the wire conductors for telephone switchboards and the like, are systematically tied together in bundles. This is done in small spaces seriously handicapping the operations of tying the strands together in bundles. In the case of telephone switchboards, the wires are tied together in groups for neatness, orderly arrangement, and in order to make the handling of the wires as simple as possible. Thus bundles of wires are tied together by lacing cords being knotted from one to four inches apart.

The manual operation of lacing wires and the like is a tedious operation. The operator tying these Wires to gether by hand must exert a considerable pressure on the cord being used. This results in injury and callouses to the fingers. In fact, such work soon results in a distortion or disfiguration of the fingers.

The present invention enables one to rapidly make an improved knot at spaced intervals from a common supply whether it be a ball or a bobbin.

One of the objects of the invention is to improve the knot itself so that it will be easily located in the desired position and rapidly fastened without undue strain upon the hand of the workman.

A further object of the invention is to increase the amount of compression exerted upon the strands which are being knotted.

Among the objects of the invention is to enable the knot to be provided on the bundle of wires or the like even though the latter may be located so close to the surrounding surface as to prevent the ready passage of the winding cord.

A still further object of the invention is to make possible the use of a long cord of indeterminate length as contrasted to the limited length possible in the manual handling of binding cord where the knots are made barehandedly.

The novel method of lacing the strands in bundles can be performed substantially without tools. However, the invention includes a novel implement by which the desired knotting can be carried out.

As illustrating the method of lacing bundles of strands, the attached drawings show the improved implement for carrying out the invention. On these drawings for purpose of illustration, the invention and means for carrying it out have been shown in the following figures:

FIGURE 1 is a side view of the implement used in the novel lacing method;

FIGURE 2 is an end view of the implement;

FIGURE 3 is a longitudinal vertical cross-section of the implement;

FIGURE 4 is a side view of the shell;

FIGURE 5 is an end view of the hand grip;

FIGURE 6 is a plane view of the needle;

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of the initial position of the implement in the lacing operation;

FIGURE 8 is a perspective view in forming the first loop;

FIGURE 9 is a similar view in forming the second loop;

FIGURE 10 is a similar view in threading the loops;

FIGURE 11 is a similar view in tightening the loops;

FIGURE 12 is a similar view of the completed knot and FIGURE 13 is an enlarged side elevation of the knot in final form.

Briefly described, the invention consists in tethering the free end of a cord of indeterminate length to a bundle of wires or other strands. The running part of the cord is then passed around the bundle in the form of two loops. The main supply of the cord is then passed through each loop in succession and the loops constricted around the bundle with considerable pressure. In carrying out this arrangement, the only space needed between the bundle and the structure in which it is being assembled, is the space necessary in which to pass the length of cord and the operating toolhook.

The method of lacing is carried out by providing an implement by which a supply of cord is carried, materially greater than what is possible for an operator to manipulate by hand. The handling of the cord is accomplished by means of a hook closely analogous to a knitting needle and operating much the same way.

In FIGURES 1 to 5 inclusive there has been shown an improved implement for carrying out this purpose. The structure includes the lacing implement 21 which is in the nature of a shuttle used in weaving to carry the thread in a bobbin. Thus the implement includes a hollow handle 22. One end of the handle is closed by means of a cap 23, which fits over one end of the hollow handle 22.

The opposite end of the handle carries a head 24 which is in the form of a tapering cylinder. This head carries a hook 25. One side of the hollow handle 22 is provided with a grip plate or clamp 26 which serves as a brake to prevent undesired release of the cord from the bobbin.

The head 24 has a peripheral recess 27 in which is received the front end of the handle 22.

The head 24 is drilled lengthwise as shown in FIGURE 3 to receive a hook 25. The hook is held in place by means of a set screw 28.

The grip plate or clamping member 26 is a flat blade having curvature similar to that of the hollow handle. The plate is turned down at one end 29 and provided there with a central hole 30.

The hollow handle 22 has two diametrically spaced transverse slots 31, 31 through which the end 29 of the plate 26 is passed.

A diagonal slot 32 is cut in the cylindrical wall of the hollow handle 22 from the end opposite the head. This slot ends in an angular transverse slot 33. These slots operate similarly to the slots found in the shuttle of a sewing machine and for the same purpose, namely to per- J mit threading and withdrawal of the cord from the bobbin.

A central bolt 34 passes longitudinally through the handle 22. At its front end it carries a thrust washer 35. Beyond the thrust washer the end of the bolt 34 is screw threaded to fit within an axial screw threaded hole 36 in the head. The opposite end of the bolt is slotted to permit it to be inserted with a screw driver.

In assembling the implement, the bolt 34 with the thrust washer is passed through the hole 30 in the end of the grip plate 26 before fastening.

The bobbin 36' with a full supply of the cord 37 is then inserted in the open end of the handle. The free end of the cord 37 is passed through the slot 32 into the transverse slot 33 where it is held under the grip plate 26.

The cap 23 has a peripheral recess or rabbet which fits in the end of the hollow handle. The cap 23 has a stud 38. This stud is knurled on its outer surface so that it may be driven into tight frictional engagement in the cap 23. The stud has an axial screw threaded hole 39 by which it is fitted over the screw threaded end of the bolt 34.

The stud 38 is drilled to provide two right angled holes 40 through which the free end of the cord 37 is passed.

It is evident that the cord 37 may be drawn at will through the stud 38. In order to prevent too rapid delivery of the cord, it is only necessary to grip the plate 26 more closely against the hollow handle 22, thus clamping the cord and arresting its removal.

The implement above described is useful in facilitating the novel method for making a series of knots from a single cord and at spaced intervals along the bundle of wires or the like. In FIGURE 7 I have shown a bundle of wires or the like 41, such as is customarily harnessed together on a telephone switchboard, an electronic panel or a similar electric assemblage.

The free end 42 of the cord 37 coming from the stud at the end of the implement 21, is knotted around the bundle at the point from which the lacing or harness is to run. The implement or shuttle is then drawn forward over the bundle as shown in FIGURE 7, while a portion of the cord forms a bight 43. This is the portion which ultimately will become a loop in the finished knot.

The hook 25 of the shuttle 21 is then passed underneath the bundle and attached to the cord 37 near the bight 43.

By drawing the implement back, a portion of the bight 43 is drawn with the hook 25 to form a second loop 44, with the bight 43 remaining as a loop.

The next step is to pass the book 25 forward through both loops 44 and 43 in succession (FIGURE 9).

By passing the shuttle 21 through both loops 43 and 44, the cord 37 then is caused to pass through the loops into the form shown in FIGURE 11. By this time, the grip plate 26 has been tightened to clamp the cord 37 so that further movement of the implement 21 causes the loops to be tightened. It is advantageous to hold the loop 43 in position parallel to the strands being bundled, as is shown in FIGURE 12. In this way the desired spacing may be determined before the knot is tightened. This movement is accomplished by drawing the shuttle back toward the operator, thus establishing the desired position for the loop 43. The shuttle is then pushed away sideways, and serves to tighten the two loops with more compression than it is possible to accomplish by the fingers alone. The loops are then tightened so that the cords are brought close together in parallel form, as shown in FIGURE 13.

The knot made as above described, has manifest advantages. It is materially tighter and more secure than the knots or hitches ordinarily made. The harness can be made made of a cord or thread of natural or synthetic material, or may be made as synthetic monofilaments. This knotting harness also has the advantage that the cord or analogous material can be fed from a bobbin in materially greater length than what it is feasible to use in manual operation.

The method as described is suitable for use in restricted spaces, even where the bundle lies against a partition. The method can be carried out rapidly. There is increased assurance that the knotting will be at the desired spacing. Moreover, the knotting is carried out with increased tightness of the cord, so that the compression on the strands or the like is more than thirty percent greater than what is possible with manual knotting.

A significant feature is that the method of forming the knots or lacing effectively avoids the inconvenience and even physical discomfort and injury to the fingers of the workman.

The implement by which the invention is practiced has been materially improved in the arrangement of parts, the convenience for use, effectiveness and economy of manufacture.

The invention has been described and illustrated in the preferred form without ilimitation as to materials, minor structural changes and the like within the scope of the following claims.

What I claim as my invention is:

1. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like with a single cord from a supply of indeterminate length, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, forming a second loop in the first one, passing the cord through both loops and tightening the loops to form a knot and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

2. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like with a single cord from a supply of indeterminate length, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, drawing a portion of the first loop across under the bundle to form a second loop, passing the cord across over the bundle through both loops, tightening the loops to form a knot, and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

3. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like with a single cord from a supply of indeterminate length, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, hooking a portion of the loop across under the bundle to form a second loop, passing the cord across over the bundle through both loops, tightening the loops to form a knot and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

4. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like with a single cord from a supply of indeterminate length, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, hooking a portion of the loop across under the bundle to form a second loop, passing the cord across over the bundle through both loops, arresting the continued delivery of the cord from the supply, tightening the loops to form a knot and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

5. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like with a cord from a supply of indeterminate length, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, hooking a portion of the loop across under the bundle to form a second loop, passing the cord across over the bundle through both loops, holding the first loop at the desired 5 distance from the point of attachment, tightening the loops to form a knot and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

6. The method of lacing a bundle of strands and the like With a cord of indeterminate length from a bobbin in a carrier, which consists in attaching the free end of the cord to the bundle, forming a loop on the far side of the bundle, drawing the cord across over the bundle, booking a portion of the loop across under the bundle to form a second loop, passing the cord across over the bundle through both loops, clamping the cord to its carrier, tightening the loops to form a knot and repeating the lacing beyond the knot so formed.

References Cited in 6 the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US745623 *Apr 23, 1903Dec 1, 1903Robert W HuntonKnotter.
US991588 *Feb 13, 1911May 9, 1911Henry M WolfBundle-tying implement.
US1978103 *Oct 15, 1931Oct 23, 1934CroasdaleStraw mat
US2438538 *Oct 3, 1945Mar 30, 1948Carter Arthur DeweyKnot
US2591854 *May 8, 1947Apr 8, 1952American Viscose CorpKnot
US2646298 *Jul 15, 1952Jul 21, 1953Joseph C LearyMethod of knot tying
US2758359 *Jan 10, 1955Aug 14, 1956Helen SwensonHooked rug method
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3328059 *Aug 24, 1965Jun 27, 1967Int Standard Electric CorpCable binding stitch and method
US4683885 *Sep 22, 1986Aug 4, 1987Richard Wolf GmbhMethod for tying sewing threads
Classifications
U.S. Classification289/1.5, 289/17
International ClassificationA01F1/00, A01F1/02, H01B13/00, B65B13/26, H01R43/00, H01B13/012, B65B13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65B13/265, H01R43/00, H01B13/01272, A01F1/02
European ClassificationB65B13/26T, H01B13/012M2, A01F1/02, H01R43/00