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Publication numberUS3138873 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1964
Filing dateSep 8, 1961
Priority dateSep 8, 1961
Publication numberUS 3138873 A, US 3138873A, US-A-3138873, US3138873 A, US3138873A
InventorsBishop Harold P
Original AssigneeBishop Harold P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vacuum attachment for dental aspirator unit
US 3138873 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1964 H. P. BISHOP VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 8, 1961 INVENTQR. Ha/mldR Buslwp W k W ATTORNEYS June 1964 H. P. BISHOP 3, 3 73 VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT Filed Sept. 8. 1961 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN TQR.

Harold/125mm $42040, wfi aaw ATTORNEYS June 30, 1964 Filed Sept. 8. 1961 H. P. BISHOP VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 INV EN TOR.

Harold Bishop BY F ATTORNEYS H. P. BISHOP June 30, 1964 SPIRATOR UNIT VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL A 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Sept. 8. 1961 INVENTQR. HaroldRBwlup BY 9mg 9 & W

ATTORNEYS June 30, 1964 H. P. BISHOP 3,138,873

VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT Filed Sept. 8, 1961 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 I24 I20 124a V I 9 I 0: I220 I25 H3 I |25b :22 l "5 I0 I27 INVENTOR.

HwroldRBiskop BY 9M0, W8JM ATTORNEYS June 30, 1964 H. P. BISHOP VACUUM ATTACHMENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Sept. 8, 1961 INVENTQR. HwmldP. Buslup BY g wvzqam ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,138,873 VACUUM ATTACHlVlENT FOR DENTAL ASPIRATOR UNIT Harold P. Bishop, 512 W. Gorgas SL, Louisville, Ohio Filed Sept. 8, 1961, Ser. No. 136,753 16 Claims. ((11. 32-33) The invention relates to vacuum apparatus for operation of a dental aspirator device. In various dental techniques it is necessary that saliva, blood, broken teeth, bone chips, filling material and other debris be removed from the patients mouth.

With present dental practice of excavating teeth by an abrasive slurry blast accompanied by a considerable water supply, it is necessary that the abrasive slurry and excess water be rapidly and continuously removed from the mouth of the patient during the excavating process.

A primary object of the invention is to provide a motordriven vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit having a volume aspiration vacuum device and a cup or basin device, valve means for selectively connecting either the volume aspiration vacuum device or the cup or basin device to the vacuum attachment, and switch means actuated by said valves for controlling the motion of the vacuum attachment.

Another object of the invention is to provide a vacuum attachment of the character referred to comprising a housing, an air inlet for connection to the dental aspirator unit, an air outlet communicating with a motor-driven fan, and a liquid drain pipe having a trap valve therein.

A further object of the invention is to provide such a vacuum attachment having a porous bag located therein and surrounding the air inlet, whereby broken pieces of teeth, bone chips, filling material and other solid debris will be received and collected in the bag, while liquids and air may pass freely therethrough. V

A still further object of the invention is to provide a vacuum attachment of this character having a float therein for automatically shutting off the air outlet from the housing to the fan when the liquid level in the housing reaches a predetermined level.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a vacuum attachment in which the motor-driven fan is included therein as a single unit.

A further object of the invention is to provide a vacuum attachment of the character referred to with means for attaching the same to a conventional vacuum apparatus.

It is also an object of the invention to provide such a vacuum attachment having means for mounting the motordriven fan for substantially noiseless operation.

In general terms, the invention may be briefly described as comprising a vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit having devices such as a volume aspirator vacuum device, a cup or basin device, or other devices for removing blood, saliva, other liquids, broken pieces of teeth, bone chips, filling material or other solid debris from a patients mouth during a dental operation.

The vacuum attachment comprises a housing defining a chamber having an air inlet connected by a conduit such as a flexible hose to the dental aspirator unit, an air outlet controlled by a float, a liquid drain outlet having a trap valve thereon, and a motor-driven fan connected to the air outlet.

A porous bag is located within the vacuum attachment, surrounding the inlet, for trapping any solid materials, liquid passing through the bag to the bottom of the chamber for later discharge through the liquid outlet, and air passing through or over the bag to the air outlet and thence to the motor-driven fan.

Manually operated valves in the dental aspirator unit control selective connection of either of the devices there- 3,138,873 Patented June 30, 1964 "ice in to the vacuum attachment, and switches actuated by said valves control operation of the motor-driven fan.

The above and other objects, apparent from the drawings and following description, may be attained, the above described difiiculties overcome and the advantages and results obtained, bythe apparatus, construction, arrangement and combinations, sub-combinations and parts which comprise the present invention, a preferred embodiment of which, illustrative of the best mode in which applicant has contemplated applying the principle, being set forth in detail in the following description and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vacuum attachment embodying the invention, showing the same connected by a flexible hose to a dental unit;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view of the form of the vacuum attachment shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a transverse section taken on the line 4-4, FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged bottom plan view of the dental unit;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view of the upper portion of the vacuum attachment shown in FIG. 3, showing a modified float arrangement;

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary horizontal sectional view taken as on the line 77, FIG. 3;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged, vertical sectional view of the modified form of the vacuum attachment shown in FIG. 2; and a FIG. 9 is a view similar to FIG. 8, showing a modified form of float arrangement.

Referring first to the embodiment of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1, 3, 4 and 5, in which similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout, the apparatus embodying the invention includes the vacuum attachment indicated generally at 1 and the dental aspirator unit indicated generally at 2.

As best shown in FIG. 3, the vacuum attachment includes the upper housing 3 defining a chamber 3a, for connection to the dental aspirator unit and having means therein for separating the liquids, solids and air drawn therethrough from the devices in the dental aspirator unit, the lower housing 4 enclosing the motor-driven fan and provided with means for detachably mounting the upper housing 3 thereon.

An air inlet tube 5, preferably downwardly and inwardly disposed, as shown in FIG. 3, is located in the upper end of the housing 3, and as shown in FIG. 1, is adapted to be connected, by a conduit such as the flexible hose 6, with the dental aspirator unit 2.

Within, and located adjacent to one side of the chamber 3a, is provided a vertical tube 7, open at its upper and lower ends and connected at an intermediate point with the inner end of the inlet tube 5.

A bag 8, formed of any suitable porous fabric or the like, is suspended around the lower end of the vertical tube 7, as by the supporting hooks 9, to receive and trap all solid debris such as pieces of broken teeth, fillings, bone chips and the like, removed from the patients mouth by either of the devices in the dental aspirator unit and drawn through the hose 6 and inlet tube 5 to the chamber 3a of the vacuum attachment.

This bag being porous, all liquids drawn into the vacuurn attachment from the dental unit will quickly drain therethrough and will be collected upon the concaved bottom wall 10, from which they will later drain through the central liquid outlet 11 into the liquid drain pipe 12.

A trap valve 13 is provided in the drain pipe 12, the hinged valve gate 14 thereof being normally held closed G by suction during operation of the vacuum attachment. Below the trap valve 13, the drain pipe 12 leads to any suitable drain connection such as a sewer or the like.

The upper end of the housing 3 is closed by a detachable cover, comprising the domed top wall 15, the peripheral edge of the cover terminating in the downturned flange 15a seating upon the open upper end of the cylindrical housing 3.

A gasket 16 of suitable material is located between the open upper end of the housing 3 and the cover, and any conventional type of clamping clips 17 are provided upon the upper portion of the housing 3 for engagement over the peripheral portion of the cover for securing the cover to the housing and providing an air-tight seal therebetween.

A baffle 18 depends from the cover adjacent to the vertical tube 7 of the inlet means, for the purpose of preventing air discharged through the upper open end of the tube 7, and any moisture carried in the air, from being carried across to the other side of the chamber 3a.

The vertical air outlet tube 19 is located through the bottom wall of chamber 3a, at the opposite side of said chamber from the inlet 5, and extends upwardly into the chamber 311, terminating in the bell 19a. The air outlet also includes the vertical tube 20, the lower end of which is fitted into the bell 19a of tube 19.

Although a single outlet tube might be used, it is desirable for convenience of manufacturing and assembling that the outlet comprises the separable tubes 19 and 20. A ring 21 is mounted on the upper open end of the tube 20, as by the depending tubular skirt 22 inserted into the upper end thereof.

An outlet closure valve 23 is provided upon the upper end of the tube 20, being hinged to the ring 21 as indicated at 23a. The valve 23 is provided on its inner surface with a gasket 24 of rubber or the like adapted to seat upon the valve seat 21a of the ring 21 when the valve is in closed position.

An operating bracket is connected to the valve 23. beyond the pivot point 23a, and comprises the outwardly curved, slotted arm 25 and the angular arm 26. For the purpose of operating the valve 23, to close or open the same as the liquid level rises or falls in the chamber 3a, a float 27 is provided.

This float may be formed of any suitable material which will float upon water or similar liquid, and may be of any size or shape desirable or necessary for performing its required function. For the purpose of illustration, the float 27 is disclosed as formed of a light weight, nonabsorbent material, preferably cellular foam-like plastic material characterized by a multiplicity of non-communicating cells throughout its area.

Also for purpose of illustration only, the float 27 is shown as of cylindrical shape, with a portion of its periphery cut out as at 27a to accommodate the tubes 19 and 20, but it should be understood that this is a matter of design only.

A rod 28 is connected to the float 27 and ends upwardly therefrom, being slidably located through the guides 29, welded or otherwise attached to the air outlet tube 20. The upper end of the rod 28 is located through the slot 25a in the arm 25, and is provided with a suitable head or shoulder 28a of greater dimensions than the width of the slot 25a.

With little or no liquid in the chamber 3a, the float 27 and valve 23 will be in the valve open position shown in FIG. 3, the weight of the float hanging from the slotted arm 25 holding the valve open as shown. As the liquid level rises in the chamber 3a, the float will rise thereon until it reaches the point where the head 28a of the float rod 23 contacts the arm 26 and pushes the valve to closed position, seating on the valve seat 21a and closing the air outlet 19-20. V

A relief valve 33, of any conventional construction, may be mounted upon one side of the housing 3, as by an el- 4t bow 34 which forms communication with the interior of the housing 3, below the concaved bottom wall 10 therein.

For the purpose of deadening the sound of the motordriven fan, relatively heavy insulation material, such as fibre glass or the like, is attached to the underside of the concaved wall 10, as indicated at 35, and to the interior of the side wall of the housing 3, below the concaved wall 1-3, as indicated at 36.

A substantially channel-shaped annulus 37 is welded, or otherwise connected, to the interior of the cylindrical housing 3, at the lower end thereof and provided with an inturned annular flange 33 with an enlarged central opening 39 therein providing an air outlet from the lower portion of the housing 3.

The lower end of the cylindrical housing 3 is outwardly offset, as indicated at 40, and terminates in the depending annular flange 41 adapted to seat upon the inverted U- shape gasket 42 located upon the upper open edge of the lower housing 4.

For the purpose of detachably securing the upper housing 3 to the lower housing 4, depending hold-down hooks 43 are located through the angular brackets 44 upon the exterior of the lower portion of the upper housing 3. The lower hooked ends 45 of the members 43 engage the down-turned hooks 46, welded or otherwise secured to the periphery of the housing 4, adjacent its upper end.

The upper ends of the hook members 43 are threaded, as indicated at 47, to receive thumb nuts 48 by means of which the upper housing 3 may be detachably clamped to the lower housing 4 to provide an air-tight joint therebetween.

The lower housing 4 preferably comprises the cylindrical, spaced inner and outer shells 49 and 50 respectively. The outer shell 50 is of less height than the inner shell 49, and an inverted U-shape gasket 51 is located over the upper edge thereof to receive the annularly offset flange 52 at'the lower end of the curved skirt 53, which is provided with the upper cylindrical end 54 surrounding the upper end portion of the inner shell 49. The gasket 42 is located over the upper end 54 of the skirt 53 as well as the upper end of the inner shell 49.

A substantially channel-shaped annulus 56, similar to the annulus 37 but inverted in position, is Welded or otherwise secured within the inner shell 49, at a point spaced below the upper end thereof, and terminates in the inturned annular flange 57. A multiple stage fan 59 is mounted in the fan housing 60 located between the annuli 37 and 56.

Annular gaskets 61 and 62, of angular cross section, are located between the upper and lower ends of the fan casing 64) and the annuli 37 and 56 for providing sounddeadening means for mounting the fan casing and the motor 63 which is attached thereto.

The skirt 53 is clamped upon the upper end of the outer shell 50 by means of the legs 64, welded or otherwise secured at their lower ends to the interior of the shell 50 and attached to the skirt by means of screws 65 and nuts 66, which are preferably Tinnerman-type nuts.

A plurality of cushion blocks 67, of rubber or the like, may be attached to the angular brackets 68 upon the fan housing 60. For this purpose, nuts 69 may be molded within the cushion blocks to receive screws 70 located through the brackets 68 and into said nuts.

One of the cushion blocks 67 may be attached to the annulus 56 by means of a screw 71, having enlarged head 7 2 molded within the lower end of this cushion block, a nut 73 being threaded upon the screw 71 on the underside of the annulus 56. The other cushion blocks 67 merely contact and rest upon the annulus 56, but are preferably not attached thereto.

An air outlet tube 74 is located through the shells 49 and 5th of the lower housing, at a point below the fan housing 61). This outlet may be in the form of a rubber coupling to which an outlet tiibe or hose may be connected, if desired.

A flat bottom wall 75 is provided for the housing 4, and has the depending peripheral flange 76 received within and connected to the lower end portion of the shell 50 in any conventional manner.

A circular partition wall 77, preferably formed of insulation material such as fiber glass, is located between the annulus 56 and the bottom wall 75, spaced inwardly from the inner shell 49 of the circular housing so as to form a circular chamber 77a communicating with the air outlet tube 74.

An opening 77b is formed in the partition wall 77 at a point opposite to the outlet tube '7 4, whereby exhaust cooling air passed around the motor 63 by the motor cooling fan 63a may be discharged through the opening 77b into the circular chamber 77a and exhausted through the air outlet tube 74.

Sound-deadening material such as felt indicated at 75a may be placed upon the top of the flat bottom wall 75. For further deadening the sound of the motor and fan, an annular box 78 depends from the bottom wall 75 and has the downwardly domed bottom wall 78a.

Sound-deadening material such as felt is located upon the underside of the bottom wall 75 and upon the top of the domed bottom 78a as indicated at 78b. Air inlet openings 78c are formed in the box 78, and the bottom wall 75 has an air inlet opening 75b therein, whereby air is drawn in from the outside through the openings 78c and 75b, by the motor cooling fan 63a.

Insulation material such as fibre glass is located upon the inner wall of the outer shell 50 of the lower housing, as indicated at 50a. An outlet opening 50b is formed in the lower portion of the outer shell 50 and through the adjacent fibre glass lining 50a. An air outlet opening 49a is formed in the upper portion of the inner shell 49 adjacent to the exhaust louvers 60a in the lower portion of the multiple stage fan housing 60.

A vertical bafile wall 79 is located between the inner and outer shells 49 and 50 at a point between the outlet openings 49a and 50b as best shown in FIG. 7. Air is drawn into the multiple stage fan housing 60 through the inlet opening 60b in the upper end thereof and is discharged by the multiple stage fan 59 through the exhaust louvers 60a and through the outlet opening 490: in the inner shell 49.

As shown in FIG. 7, the air exhaust through the opening 49a is deflected by the batlle 79 and caused to travel in the direction of the arrows entirely around the annular space between the inner and outer shells 49 and 5t), being finally discharged from the lower housing through the outlet opening 50b.

Legs 80 are connected to the bottom wall 75, in any usual and well known manner, and may be provided with the inturned lower ends 81 upon which are located rubber feet 82 for supporting the apparatus upon the floor.

A junction box 85, of conventional design, is attached to the exterior of the lower housing 4, for making suitable electrical connections to the motor 63, through a conventional electric .cord 86 leading to a power line, and to the dental aspirator unit 2 through electric cord 87.

Referring now to the dental aspirator unit, indicated generally at 2, and illustrated in detail in FIG. 5, the same may be enclosed in a housing 88, adapted to be mounted upon any suitable support adjacent to the dental chair in which the patient is being treated.

A T-coupling 89 is located in the housing, the central tubular leg 90 thereof being connected to the flexible hose 6 leading to the air inlet of the vacuum attachment. Opposite ends 91 and 91a of the T-coupling are connected, through conventional shut-oif valves 92 and 92a, with the tubular couplings 93 and 93a.

Flexible hose 94 and 94a are connected to the couplings 93 and 93a for attachment of such devices as a cup or 6 basin 95, or a volume vacuum aspirator 96. When not in use, these devices may be hung upon the supporting brackets 97 at each end of the housing 88.

Mercury switches 98 and 98a are mounted upon the rotatable valve stems 99 and 99a of the valves 92 and 92a respectively, and are connected by wires 100 to the electric cord 87 leading to the motor of the vacuum attachment.

Manually operable handles 101 and 101a are connected to the rotatable valve stems 99 and 99a of the valves 92 and 92a, for selectively opening and closing each valve, so as to place either of the devices or 96 in communication with the vacuum attachment through the hose 6.

The longitudinal axes of the rotatable valve stems 99 and 99a are inclined from the horizonal, as shown in FIG. 5, whereby when either valve stem is rotated to open position, the corresponding mercury switch 98 or 98a carried thereby will be tilted to position to close the circuit therethrough to the fan motor 63 in the vacuum attachment. Thus, it will be evident that when either valve is opened to connect the corresponding device 95 or 96 with the vacuum attachment, the motor will be automatically started.

When not in operation, the parts of the vacuum attachment are normally in the positions shown in FIG. 3, and the parts of the dental unit are normally in the positions shown in FIG. 5. In order to operate the apparatus, either valve handle 101 or 101a is moved to open the corresponding valve 92 or 92a, depending upon which of the devices 95 or 96 is to be used.

Upon rotation of the corresponding valve stem 99 or 99a to open position, the mercury switch 98 or 98a carried thereby will be tilted to closed position, closing the circuit therethrough to the fan motor 63 and starting operation of the multiple stage fan 59.

This immediately creates a suction through the aspirator device 95 or 96, as the case may be, and through the corresponding hose 94 or 94a and through the opened valve 92 or 92a to the T-coupling 89, thence through the flexible hose 6 to the air inlet 5 of the chamber 3a of the vacuum attachment, thence through the vertical tube 19- 20 to the fan 59.

The suction thus created within the housing 3 will immediately pull the hinged gate 14 of the trap valve 13 up to closed position, as shown in broken lines in FIG. 3, closing the liquid drain outlet 11.

As liquids and bits of solid debris are removed from the patients mouth by either of the devices 95 or 96, as the case may be, they are drawn by suction through the corresponding hose 94 or 94a, valve 92 or 92a to the T-coupling 89, and then through the flexible hose 6 and into the air inlet 5 of the chamber 3a of the vacuum attachment.

Solid objects are trapped in the porous bag 8, while liquids drain through the bag to the bottom wall 10 of the housing 3 and the air will be drawn through the apparatus to the multiple stage fan 59 as above described.

When the apparatus is in use for any extended period of time, a considerable amount of liquids will accumulate in the chamber 3a, above the bottom wall 10 thereof. This condition is aggravated in cases where the dentist is excavating teeth by the modern method of feeding a slurry of abrasive material coupled with a water supply, which requires continual removal of the slurry and water from the patients month.

As the liquid level rises in the chamber 3a approaching the danger point, the float 27 will be moved up, the rod 28 thereof sliding upwardly through the guides 29 and through the slot 25a in the arm 25 until the head 28a thereof strikes the angular arm 26 and swings the valve 23 to closed position on the valve seat 21a, shutting ofi the suction, when the motor 63 is shut off.

The hinged gate 14 in the trap valve 13 will drop open by gravity, permitting the liquids to drain out of the chamber 3a through the liquid outlet 11 and drain pipe 12.

When the liquid has drained from the chamber 3a, the fioat 27 will be lowered to open the valve 23, as shown in FIG. 3, and the operation may be continued as above described.

Reference is now made to the modified form of the invention shown in FIGS. 2 and 8, in which the vacuum attachment is in the form of a separate unit, the air inlet of which is connected by a conduit, such as a flexible hose, to the dental aspirator unit, and the air outlet of Which is connected by a conduit, such as a flexible hose, to a conventional vacuum apparatus.

In FIG. 2, the vacuum attachment to which the invention pertains, is indicated generally at 105, and a conventional vacuum apparatus is indicated generally at 106. The vacuum attachment 105 comprises a cylindrical housing 107 having a cover indicated generally at 108 and a bottom wall 109, defining a chamber 110.

An air inlet tube 111, preferably downwardly and inwardly disposed as shown in FIG. 8, is located in the upper end of the housing 107, and as shown in FIG. 2, is adapted to be connected by a suitable conduit, such as the flexible hose 112, to a dental aspirator unit such as indicated generally at 2 in FIGS. 1 and 5.

The air inlet means may be the same as shown in detail in FIG. 3 of the drawings, and includes the vertical tube 113, open at upper and lower ends and connected at an intermediate point with the inner end of the inlet tube 111.

A porous bag 114, formed of fabric or the like, is suspended around the lower end of the vertical tube 113, as by the supporting hooks 115, to receive and collect all solid debris, such as pieces of broken teeth, bone chips, filling material and the like, which are removed from the patients mouth by either of the devices in the dental aspirator unit and drawn through the hose 112 and inlet means 111413 to the chamber 110 of the vacuum attachment.

As above described with reference to FIG. 3, all liquids drawn into the chamber 110 are quickly drained through the bag 114 and will be collected upon the concaved bottom wall 109, from which they may be later drained through the liquid discharge opening 115.

A liquid drain pipe 116 communicates with the liquid discharge opening 115, and a trap valve 117, similar to the trap valve 13 shown in FIG. 3, is located in the liquid drain pipe. The hinged valve gate 118, within the trap valve 117, will be normally held closed by suction during the operation of the vacuum attachment.

The cover 108 is domed, as in the form of the invention shown in FIG. 3, and has the peripheral flange 119, seating upon the open upper end of the cylindrical housing 107, an air-tight joint being formed by the gasket 120 interposed therebetween. The cover may be clamped upon the housing by the clamping clips 121.

A tube 122 is located in the chamber 110, the lower end thereof being connected to the elbow 123 which extends through one side of the housing. A valve seat 122a is provided at the upper end of the tube 122, and a valve 124 is hingedly connected thereto and provided with the gasket 124a.

As shown in FIG. 3, and above described, the valve has an operating bracket attached thereto, comprising the curved, slotted arm 125 and the angular arm 125a. A float 126 has a rod 126a attached thereto and slidably located through the guides 127 and the slotted arm 125 and provided with a head or shoulder 12521 at its upper end.

The vacuum apparatus indicated generally at 106 in FIG. 2, may be of any conventional construction, having a fan (not shown) thereon, similar to the fan shown in FIG. 3, and adapted to be rotated by the electric motor 128. A suitable conduit, such as the flexible hose 129, connects the air outlet 123 of the vacuum attachment 105 to the air intake 130 for the fan in the vacuum apparatus 106. The motor 128 may be connected by flexible electric cord 131 to the mercury switches in the dental aspirator unit, in the manner shown in FIG. 5.

In the operation of this embodiment of the invention, when either of the aspirator devices of the dental aspirator unit is placed in a communication with the conduit 112, by operation of the desired valve in the dental aspirator unit, the corresponding mercury switch in the dental aspirator unit will be closed, starting the motor 128 and operating the fan in the vacuum apparatus 106.

A suction will thus be created through the conduit 112, air inlet means 111113, within the chamber of the vacuum attachment 107, and through the air outlet tube 123 and conduit 129 to the suction fan in the vacuum apparatus 1%.

Liquids and solid debris will be removed from the patients mouth through the conduit 112 to the chamber 110. Solid debris will be received and collected in the porous bag 114, While liquids will pass therethrough and be received in the bottom of the chamber 110, and air will be drawn out of the chamber 110, through the air outlet tube 123 and conduit 129 to the intake side of the fan in the vacuum apparatus 106.

The hinged gate 113 of the trap valve 117 will be held up in closed position, by the suction in the chamber 110, closing the liquid outlet 115. As the liquid level in the chamber 110 rises to the predetermined level, the float 126 will be raised closing the valve 124 as above described with reference to FIG. 3.

As the suction is thus reduced in the chamber 110, and the motor 128 is shut 011?, the hinged gate 118 of the trap valve 117 will drop by gravity, opening the liquid outlet and permitting the liquid to drain from the chamber 110. After the liquid has drained out of the chamber 110, the float 126 may be returned to the lowered position, as shown in FIG. 8, and the operation of the apparatus may be continued as above described.

In FIG. 6 is shown the upper housing of an embodiment of the invention similar to that shown in FIG. 3, with a modified form of float and valve arrangement. It should be understood that the remainder of the device is the same as shown in FIG. 3.

In this embodiment, the upper housing 3' defines a chamber 3", for connection to the dental aspirator unit. The air inlet tube 5', vertical inlet tube 7' and bag 8' are all the same as illustrated in FIG. 3, and described in detail above. Also, the bottom wall 10', liquid outlet 11' and liquid drain pipe 12, with trap valve therein, are as shown and described with reference to FIG. 3.

The upper end of the housing 3 is closed by a detachable cover, indicated generally at 15', and comprising the flat bottom wall 16' and the domed top wall 17, forming a plenum chamber 18' therebetween. The peripheral edge of the cover 15 terminates in the downturned flange 19 seating upon the open upper end of the cylindrical housing 3'.

A gasket 20' of suitable material is located between the open upper end of the housing 3 and the cover, and any conventional type of clamping clips 21' are provided upon the upper portion of the housing 3' for engagement over the peripheral portion of the cover for securing the cover to the housing and providing an air-tight seal therebetween.

A centrally disposed tubular member 22' is located through the flat bottom wall 16' of the cover and forms an air outlet from the chamber 3" to the plenum chamber 18 of the cover. A vertical tube 23' has its upper end located through an opening 24 in the flat bottom wall 16 of the cover at one side of the center thereof.

A gasket 25', of rubber or other suitable material, is pressed against the underside of the bottom wall 16' of the cover surrounding the opening 24' by a flange 23 on the tube 23, to form an air-tight seal at this point. The tube 23' extends down through the interior of the housing 3', the lower end thereof being located through on opening 26 in the concaved bottom wall 10' and being welded or otherwise connected thereto as indicated at 27.

.upper end of the housing 107a.

A substantially semi-circular tubular guide 28 is'welded or otherwise attached at its upper end, as indicated at 29, to the underside of the bottom wall 16' of the cover, surrounding and concentric with the tubular air outlet 22'. A crossbar 30 is connected to the lower end of the tubular guide 28' and forms a rest for the cylindrical float 31.

This float is formed of a light weight, non-absorbent material, preferably cellular foam-like plastic material, characterized by a multiplicity of non-communicating cells throughout its area. In order to adjust the weight of the float 31 as desired, any suitable weights may be connected thereto, such as the metal spikes or nails 32'.

A relief valve 33, of any conventional construction, may be mounted upon one side of the housing 3, as by an elbow 34' which forms communication with the interior of the housing 3, below the concaved bottom wall therein.

In FIG. 9 is shown a vacuum attachment of the type shown in FIG. 8 with a modified form of float-operated valve such as shown in FIG. 6. The vacuum attachment, indicated generally at 105a in this figure, comprises a cylindrical housing 107a having a cover, indicated generally at 108a, and a bottom wall 109a defining a chamber 110a.

An air inlet tube 111a, preferably downwardly and inwardly disposed as above described and illustrated, is located in the upper end of the housing 107a and, as shown in FIG. 2, is adapted to be connected by the flexible hose 112 to the dental aspirator unit indicated generally at 2 in FIGS. 1 and 5.

This air inlet means includes the vertical tube 113a open at its upper and lower ends and connected at an intermediate point with the inclined inlet tube 111a. The porous bag 114a is suspended around the lower end of the tube 113a as by the supporting hooks 115a for the purpose above described.

A liquid drain pipe 116a communicates with the liquid discharge opening 115a, and a trap valve 117a, similar to the trap valve above described, is located in the drain pipe and provided with the hinged valve gate 118a.

The cover 108a which normally closes the upper end of the chamber 110a is detachably connected to the open This cover comprises the flat bottom wall 119a and the domed top wall 120a, the peripheral edges of which terminate in the downturned flanges 121a seating upon the open upper end of the cylindrical housing 107a, an air-tight joint being formed by the gasket 122a interposed therebetween.

An air outlet tube 124a is located entirely through the cover 108a extending downwardly into the chamber 110a and upwardly above the top of the cover. The flexible hose 129, as shown in FIG. 2, is adapted to connect the upper end of the tube 124a to the inlet 130 of the vacuum device 106.

A substantially semi-circular tubular guide 125a is attached at its upper end to the flat bottom wall 119a of the cover surrounding and concentric with the tubular air outlet 124a. A cross bar 126a is connected to the lower end of the tubular guide 125a and forms a rest for the cylindrical float 127a which may be of the same construction as the float 31' in FIG. 6.

From the above it will be obvious that a simple, compact and eflicient vacuum attachment is provided for connection to a dental aspirator unit, with means for automatically operating the vacuum attachment when a valve in the dental aspirator unit is opened.

It will also be apparent that the float in the vacuum chamber of the vacuum apparatus will automatically close the valve when liquid in the chamber approaches the danger point.

Further, it will be seen that when the suction in the vacuum chamber is shut off, and the motor is shut off, the trap valve will automatically open, draining all 10 liquid from the vacuum chamber so thatthe operation of the apparatus may be continued.

It will also be obvious that solid debris and liquids will be separated from each other and from the air, and

separately collected during operation of the apparatus.

Finally, it will be apparent that the motor-driven fan is so mounted and insulated that it will operate silently.

In the foregoing description, certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness and understanding, but no unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirements of the prior art, because such Words are used for descriptive purposes herein and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the embodiments of the improved construction illustrated and described herein are by way of example, and the scope of the present invention is not limited to the exact details of construction.

Having now described the invention or discovery, the construction, the operation, and use of preferred embodiments thereof, and the advantageous new and useful results obtained thereby; the new and useful construction, and reasonable mechanical equivalents thereof obvvious to those skilled in the art, are set forth in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising a housing having a chamber therein, air inlet means and air outlet means for said chamber, a

.conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, a motor-driven suction fan, said outlet means including an imperforate tube providing communication between said chamber and the air intake side of said suction fan, said chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, liquid outlet means for said chamber, a trap valve in said liquid outlet means, said 'trap valve being normally closed by the suction in said chamber, a float in said chamber and valve means operated by said float for closing the inlet end of the air outlet tube when liquid in the chamber reaches a predetermined level.

2. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising a housing having a chamber therein, air inlet means and air outlet means for said chamber, a conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, a motor-driven suction fan, said air outlet means including an imperforate tube providing communication between said chamber and the air intake side of said suction fan, said chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, means in said chamber associated with said air inlet means for receiving and collecting solid debris and separating it from the liquid and air, liquid outlet means for said chamber, a trap valve in said liquid outlet means, said trap valve being normally closed by the suction in said chamber, a float in said chamber and valve means operated by said float for closing the inlet end of the air outlet tube when liquid in the chamber reaches a predetermined level.

3. A vacuum attachment as defined in claim 1, in which said float is formed of light-Weight, non-absorbent foamlike cellular plastic material.

4. A vacuum attachment as defined in claim 3, in which a weight is connected to said float for adjusting the weight thereof.

5. A vacuum attachment as defined in claim 1, in which a shut-off valve controls communication through said conduit between the dental aspirator unit and said air inlet means, and an electric switch controlling operation of the fan motor is operatively connected to said valve so that opening of said valve automatically closes said switch to operate said motor.

6. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 2, in which said air inlet means comprises a downwardly and inwardly inclined inlet tube and a vertically disposed tube open at both ends and connected intermediate its ends to said downwardly and inwardly inclined tube, and a porous bag is suspended around the lower end of said vertically disposed tube for receiving and collecting solid debris and separating it from liquids and air.

7. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising housing means defining a lower chamber and an upper chamber, there being an air inlet opening in the top of said lower chamber, a suction fan located in the lower chamber and having its air intake side disposed upwardly, a motor located in the lower chamber and operatively connected to the lower side of said fan, there being an air discharge opening in the lower portion of said lower chamber, air inlet means for said upper chamber, a conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, said upper chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, a cover for said upper chamber, an imperforate tubular air outlet member located in the upper chamber and extending from the upper portion of the upper chamber through the lower end thereof, a valve hingedly mounted at the upper end of said tubu lar member, a bracket upon said valve including an angular arm and a slotted curved arm spaced therefrom, a float in said upper chamber, a guide rod upon said float, a guide bracket on said tubular member through which the guide rod is slidably located, said guide rod being slidably located through said slotted curved arm and having a head for alternate contact with said angular arm and said slotted curved arm for operating said valve, means providing communication between the lower end of said tubular member and the intake side of said fan, and liquid outlet means in the lower portion of said upper chamber.

8. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising housing means defining a lower chamber and an upper chamber, there being an air inlet opening in the top of said lower chamber, a suction fan located in the lower chamber and having its air intake side disposed upwardly, a motor located in the lower chamber and operatively connected to the lower side of said fan, there being an air discharge opening in the lower portion of said lower chamber, air inlet means for said upper chamber, a conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, said upper chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, a cover for said upper chamber, an imperforate tubular air outlet member located in the upper chamber and extending from the upper portion of the upper chamber through the lower end thereof, a valve hingedly mounted at the upper end of said tubu lar member, a bracket upon said valve including an angular arm and a slotted curved arm spaced therefrom, a float in said upper chamber, a guide rod upon said float, a guide bracket on said tubular member through which the guide rod is slidably located, said guide rod being slidably located through said slotted curved arm and having a head for alternate contact with said angular arm and said slotted curved arm for operating said valve, means providing communication between the lower end of said tubular member and the intake side of said fan, liquid outlet means in the lower portion of said upper chamber, and a trap valve in said liquid outlet means, said trap valve being normally closed by suction in said upper chamber.

9. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising housing means defining a lower chamber and an upper chamber, there being an air inlet opening in the top of said lower chamber, a suction fan located in the lower chamber and having its air intake side disposed upwardly, a motor located in the lower chamber and operatively connected to the lower side of saidfan, there being an air discharge opening in the lower portion of said lower chamber, air inlet means for said upper chamber,

a conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, said upper chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, a cover for said upper chamber, said cover being hollow and defining a plenum chamber therein, an imperforate air outlet tube for the top of said upper chamber and communicating with said plenum chamber, an imperforate tubular member extending entirely through said upper chamber and communicating at its upper end with said plenum chamber, means providing communication between the lower end of said tubular member and the intake side of said fan, liquid outlet means in the lower portion of said upper chamber, vertical guide means in said upper chamber below said air outlet tube, and a float in said vertical guide means for contacting the lower end of said air outlet tube to close the same when liquid in said upper chamber reaches a predetermined level.

10. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising housing means defining a lower chamber and an upper chamber, there being an air inlet opening in the top of said lower chamber, a suction fan located in the lower chamber and having its air intake side disposed upwardly, a motor located in the lower chamber and operatively connected to the lower side of said fan, there being an air discharge opening in the lower portion of said lower chamber, air inlet means for said upper chamber, a conduit attached to said air inlet means for connecting to a dental aspirator unit, said upper chamber being adapted to receive and collect liquids and solid debris drawn through said conduit, a cover for said upper chamber, said cover being hollow and defining a plenum chamber therein, an imperforate air outlet tube for the top of said upper chamber and communicating with said plenum chamber, an imperforate tubular member extending entirely through said upper chamber and communicating at its upper end with said plenum chamber, means providing communication between the lower end of said tubular member and the intake side of said fan, liquid outlet means in the lower portion of said upper chamber, vertical guide means in said upper chamber below said air outlet tube, and a float in said guide means for contacting the lower end of said air outlet tube to close the same when liquid in said upper chamber reaches a predetermined level, and a trap valve in said liquid outlet means, said trap valve being normally closed by the suction in said upper chamber.

11. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit, comprising a lower housing, a motor-driven fan located in said lower housing, an upper housing mounted upon said lower housing, said upper housing comprising side walls, a bottom wall and a cover defining a vacuum chamber, air inlet means in said vacuum chamber, a vertical imperforate tube communicating at its upper end with the upper portion of said vacuum chamber and communicating at its lower end with the intake side of the fan, liquid outlet means in the bottom of said vacuum chamber, means operated by suction in the vacuum chamber for closing said liquid outlet means, a valve hingedly mounted at the upper end of said vertical tube, a bracket upon said valve including an angular arm and a slotted curved arm spaced therefrom, a float in said vacuum chamber, a guide rod upon said float, a guide bracket upon said vertical tube through which said guide rod is slidably located, said guide rod being slidably located through said slotted curved arm for operating said valve for closing said vertical tube when liquid in the vacuum chamber reaches a predetermined level.

12. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 11, in which the lower housing comprises spaced shells defining an inner chamber in which the motor-driven fan is located and an outer concentric chamber, air outlet means for the inner chamber, means providing communication between the discharge side of 13 the fan and the outer concentric chamber, and air outlet means for said outer concentric chamber.

13. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 11, in which said cover is removable and means is provided for forming an air-tight seal between the vacuum chamber and the cover.

14. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 11, in which an annulus is mounted in the lower end of the upper housing below the bottom wall therein, and an annulus is mounted in the lower housing at a point spaced below the upper end thereof, and gaskets are located between the upper and lower ends of the fan casing and said upper annulus and lower annulus respectively.

15. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 14, in which a gasket is located be- 14 tween the lower and upper housings and means is provided for clamping the lower and upper housings together upon said gasket.

16. A vacuum attachment for a dental aspirator unit as defined in claim 12, in which sound insulation material is located upon the walls of said inner and outer chambers, and an insulated box is located upon the bottom of the lower housing and communicates with said inner chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,784,717 Thompson Mar. 12, 1957 2,809,429 Cerveris Oct. 15, 1957 2,821,021 Winter Jan. 28, 1958

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Classifications
U.S. Classification433/92
International ClassificationA61C17/00, B01D21/00, A61C17/06, A61C17/14
Cooperative ClassificationA61C17/04
European ClassificationA61C17/04