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Publication numberUS3139121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1964
Filing dateMar 29, 1961
Priority dateMar 29, 1961
Publication numberUS 3139121 A, US 3139121A, US-A-3139121, US3139121 A, US3139121A
InventorsBallin Gene
Original AssigneeDosamatic Dropper Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid dispensing container
US 3139121 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 30, 1964 BALLIN 3,139,121

LIQUID DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed March 29, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 1 1 k 50 42 35 41a 46 INVENTOR.

GENE BALLIN a Z ATTO NEYS June 30, 1964 BALUN 3,139,121

LIQUID DISPENSING CONTAINER Filed March 29, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 5

98 f I00 84/ [Hilfllll l HllllHIH 92 I I02 I 'H 9? #17 9e J L 1 INVENTOR alt/l3 GEN IN TORNEYS United States Patent Dropper Corporation, Freeport, N.Y., a corporation of i New York Filed Mar. 29, 1961, Ser. No. 99,119 9 Ciaims. (Cl. 141-44) This invention relates to improvements in liquid dispenser containers and more particularly with the bottling and dispensing of medicaments, pharmacological and therapeutic agents, reagents and other preparations of a type administered or measured out drop by drop or in other small measured amounts which are delicately balanced and unstable and have a relatively short shelf life.

There are many medicaments, reagents and other preparations used today which have a very short shelf life, and which must be consumed within a matter of days after preparation or its eliectiveness is severely diminished. Often the individual ingredients of these preparations, when separated, have a long storage life but once they are combined the effective life of the preparations is limited. Therefore, pharmacological and therapeutic agents and medicaments of this type could not heretofore be prepackaged and sold as non-prescription products due to their short life and hence it was necessary to market these products by prescriptions so that the ingredients of these preparations could be combined shortly before they were to be taken.

Further, many medicinal, pharmacological and therapeutic preparations and reagents are delicately balanced and unstable and undergo definite chemical changes on contact with air or the rubber of the bulb of the dropper normally used in dispensing material of this type. This chemical change not only causes a deterioration and dis coloration of the preparation but also has an adverse effect on the bulb material.

In addition, in packaging medicaments or the like with proper dispensers this last mentioned factor has introduced undesirable complexities and added costs.

One of the requirements for shipping medicaments and like liquids in bottles is that the bottle or containing vessels be completely and tightly sealed. The seal must be fully positive and effective and, in distinction to the normal closure of the vessel between uses for which the requirements are less stringent, is known as the primary seal. To maintain a primary seal and to avoid contact between the liquid in the bottle and the dropper bulb during shipment or storage, it has become customary to utilize a separate primary seal cap closure for the bottle and to provide a separate dropper in the same package. This is bulky and costly to package and awkward to use, since in use the cap must first be removed, the dropper inserted and utilized and then the cap must be replaced and the separate dropper then becomes awkward to store since it is generally still wet from the liquid dispensed. In addition, sanitary problems are created as well as creating the possibility of misplacing the dropper and not having it available when needed. 4

My prior copending application Serial No. 861,498, for

, Bottle Dropper and Closure, filed December 23, 1959,

discloses and claims a structure which overcomes this difficulty. The present invention according to other features provides improved structures for solving the same problem.

According to the present invention, a bottle assembly i or container is provided which maintains separately the ingredients of a liquid preparation until the liquid preparation is ready to be used and also isolates the pipette of a dropper assembly when used as a closure of the bottle, from the liquid composition within the bottle to avoid 3,139,121 Patented June 30, 1964 deterioration of the bulb and the contained. liquid. This allows prepackaging of many medicaments, pharmacological and therapeutic agents heretofore required to be prescribed by prescription prepared for individual consumption with resulting higher costs.

It is a primary object of the present invention to provide a container assembly which keeps separated the ingredients of a liquid composition until the composition is ready to be used thereby substantially increasing the storage life of medicaments, pharmacological and therapeutic agents, reagents and the like.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a container assembly for packaging a pharmaceutical carrier separateiy from a pharmaceutical compound for preventing the admixture of the carrier and compound to form a pharmacological composition having a short storage life until ready to be used, soas to allow this composition to be prepackaged and sold without requiring preparation by a pharmacist on an individual basis such as by prescription.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a container assembly construction, which is tamperproof, for providing a visual indication if the container has been tampered with or opened prior to use by the purchaser.

Still another object of the present invention is to provide a liquid dropper and container construction which seals the end opening of the pipette for preventing entrance of the liquid within the container when the dropper is tightened on the container, thus isolating the bulb of the dropper from the liquid during storage.

A still further object of the present invention is to provide a liquid dropper and container assembly wherein the dropper provides a cap for the container for the liquid to be dispensed thus eliminating a separate sealing cap for all types of preparations.

Still another object of this invention is to provide an improved liquid dropper container assembly incorporating the above features which is capable of easy manufacture and assembly, is sanitary and simple in construction and operation and is durable and convenient to use.

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description of preferred embodiments thereof taken with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of one form of a bulb and dropper assembly in assembled relation with a liquid containing bottle; 7

FIGURE 2 is an elevational, cross-sectional view taken along line 22 of FIGURE 1 showing one form of a dropper and container assembly according to the present invention in its closed or sealed position;

FIGURE 3 is a cross-sectional view similar to FIGURE 2 but showing the dropper-cap assembly partially unthreaded and partially removed from the container;

FEGURE 4 is an elevational, cross-sectional view of the dropper and container assembly shown in FIGURE 2 inverted during assembly and showing the bottom Wall of the container prior to assembling;

FIGURE 5 is an elevational sectional view of a further embodiment of the dropper assembly;

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary view of the lower end of a pipette in assembled position with the bottom wall 3 is provided with an exteriorly threaded neck or mouth 14, side walls 16 and a bottom wall 18.

The dropper cap assembly 12 comprises a bulb 20, hermetically mounted on a cap piece 22. Cap 22 has a depending skirt portion 24 having its inner surface provided with threads 26, which are adapted to engage with the corresponding threads of bottle neck 14. The outer peripheral surface of skirt 24 is preferably knurled or roughened or provided with longitudinal ribs as best seen in FIGURE 4 to aid in gripping and rotating the dropper assembly 12 on bottle neck 14. Advantageously, dropper cap assembly 12 may incorporate a liquid metering means such as disclosed in my copending applications, Serial Number 838,678, for Liquid Dropper Assembly, filed September 8, 1959, now Patent No. 3,020,938, and Serial No. 861,498, for Bottle Dropper and Closure filed December 23, 1959, now Patent No. 3,135,302. The use of the liquid metering apparatus such as disclosed in my copending applications could permit the user, by adjusting the relative rotative position of the cap with respect to the bulb, to adjust the extent to which the bulb may be depressed for selectively determining the desired amount of liquid which is drawn into the tube or pipette of the liquid dropper upon release of the bulb to its normal position or for determining the amount of liquid expelled from the pipette upon once more depressing the bulb.

Attached to cap 22 in some convenient manner and communicating interiorly With-bulb 28, is a longitudinally extending pipette, applicator, or tube 30. Applicator 30 has a resilient neck section 32 having an outside diameter substantially equal to or slightly greater than the inside diameter of neck 14 of container 10 for forming a tight leakproof fit therewith when the applicator is fully within bottle 10 such as when cap 12 is seated on neck 14 and even when applicator 30 is partially removed, such as shown in FIGURE 3. Preferably pipette 30 tapers inwardly and downwardly so that the lower end 34 is smaller in diameter than the upper end and has an opening therein 35. Circumferentially disposed within the lower portion of pipette 30 is a pocket or volume indicated generally at 36. As shown in FIGURES 24, pocket 36 may beforrned by having as integral partial transverse wall 38 within the pipette sealably attached to a longitudinally directed coaxial tubular portion or wall 40 which forms the lower end of the pipette. Pocket 36 is open along its lower surface. The lower edge of tubular portion 40 is indicated at 41 and as shown extends beyond the lowermost edge of applicator 30. While one manner of forming pocket 36 has been shown, other ways may be used to accomplish the same result. As shown, the pipette and the surrounding pocket is preferably molded in one piece from a flexible plastic material such as polyethylene or nylon.

Preferably bottom wall 18 of container 10 sealingly engages the bottom edges of pipette 30 and pocket 36 when pipette 30 is fully inserted within bottle 10. As shown, bottom 18 has an annular groove 42 defined by walls 44 and 46. Groove 42 is positioned concentric to container 10 and is complimentary to the lowermost edge of applicator tube 30, so that the lowermost edge of end portion 34 of applicator 30 is tightly received in groove 42 when tube 30 is fully inserted within container 10 such as when cap 22 is tightly threaded on neck 14 for forming a liquid tight seal. Centrally disposed in bottom wall 18 is an annular surface 48 having a diameter substantially equal to the outer diameter of end 41 and tubular portion 40. Annular surface 48 is positioned'so as to co -ope rate with end 41 for forming a liquid tight seal when cap assembly 12 is fully threaded on container 10 as shown best in FIGURE 2. Preferably bottom wall 18 tapers downwardly and inwardly from wall'46 to the peripheral edge of annular surface 48 which taper is greater than the taper of the lower end of'portion 40 of pipette 30. Bottom wall 18 has a skirt portion 50 dimensioned to set tightly against the lower inner peripheral surface of container side wall 16. Advantageously the inner peripheral surface of side wall 16 is undercut for forming a flange 52 as seen best in FIGURE 4. The outer surface of skirt portion 50 is securely joined to the inner surface of side wall 16 in any suitable manner to form an air-tight seal. This may be done by cementing, sealing, press fitting, tongue and groove construction or the like. As seen in FIGURE 2, in their assembled positions, the lowermost edges of skirt portion 5-9 and side wall 16 are coplanar to form a smooth surface for the standing of container 10. Bottom wall 18 should not protrude beyond skirt portion 50, so as to provide a stable container. Advantageously, the under surface of bottom wall 18 has a plurality of radial ribs 53 which add to the rigidity of the wall. V

In filling the container, cap assembly 12 is tightly threaded on neck portion 14 of container 10. This assembly is then inverted as shown in FIGURE 4 and a measured amount of ingredients 54, illustratively shown dry, preferably in powdered form to promote quick dissolving, is placed in pocket 36. Further, a measured quantity of liquid ingredients 56 is metered into the liquid reservoir formed by side wall 16 and threaded cap 22. While in general the dry ingredient will be the pharmaceutical compound and the liquid ingredient will be the carrier, this may vary so long as the ingredients in their separated condition have long shelf life. After the ingredients have been properly positioned in pocket 36 and bottle 10, bottom wall 18 is mounted on the end of side wall 16 and sealed in place. Groove 42 forms a fluid tight seal with the end of lower portion 34 of applicator tube 30 and annular surface 48 forms a fluid tight seal with end 41 of tubular portion 40 as shown best in FIG- URE 2. The ingredients are maintained in their separate condition even when bottle 10 is placed in its normal position and hence there is no deterioration or loss of strength of the preparation until the ingredients are combined. In assembled position no liquid ingredient can enter pipette 30 since its lower end is sealed. Hence no liquid can come in contact with bulb 20. Therefore a primary seal is formed which avoids the use of separate sealing means.

To use the liquid composition, the purchaser partially unscrews cap assembly 12 from container 10 thereby partially removing pipette 30 from container 10, as shown in FIGURE 3. This breaks the seal between bottom wall 18 and theend of applicator tube 30 and end 41 of portion 40, so that diy ingredients 54 and the liquid ingredients 56 are combined. Container 10 may be shaken until all the dry ingredients are completely dissolved in liquid 56 if the desired preparation is to be a solution. Pipette 30 is filled in a conventional manner by depressing bulb 20 inwardly as far as the metering means will permit and releasing it, while pipette 30 remains immersed in the composition. The amount of liquid drawn into pipette 30 may be preselected according to relative rotative positions between cap22 and bulb 20 as indicated by the selected one of numerals 57 on top of bulb 20 as shown in FIG. 1. The cap assembly 12 is'completely removed from container 10 and the liquid composition is dispensed'in the usual manner by depressing bulb 20, inwardly as far as possible for ejecting the de sired amount of liquid as previously set on the metering mechanism and indicated by the numerical setting, which is more fully described in my co-pending applications mentioned above.

A further embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGURE 5. Here a cap assembly 59 has a depending resilient skirt portion 60 disposed radially'inwardly and spaced from the inner peripheral surface of depending threaded skirt portion 62. The outer diameter of depending skirt portion 68 is about-the same diameter as the inner diameter of threaded neck portion 14 of container 10 for forming a fluid-tight seal when inserted therein. Preferably resilient skirt portion 60 is longer than thread-' ed skirt portion 62 for maintaining a fluid-tight seal with bottle neck 14 while cap assembly 59 is partially unthreaded from container so as to insure intimate mixing of the separated ingredients of the preparation. A pipette 64 is inwardly tapered at its lowermost end 66 for forming an output orifice 68. Surrounding tapered portion 66 of pipette 64 is a circumferential wall 70 integrally joined to pipette 64 and forming a volume or pocket '72. Pocket 72 is bounded by the tapered portion 66 of pipette 64 and peripheral wall 70 and which is similar to pocket 36 described above. Cap assembly 59 is used in a manner similar to that described above with respect to cap assembly 12. The lower ends of tapered portion 66 and wall 79 of pipette 64 coact with a bottom wall similar in shape and structure as wall 18 of container 10 shown in FIGURES 2 through 4 to form a seal.

A further embodiment is shown in FIGURE 6. A pipette tit having a tapered lower portion is shown fully inserted within a container 82. The upper portion of pipette 80 is received and held in airtight relation in some convenient manner by a suitable cap, not shown. Examples of such a cap are shown in my copending application Serial No. 861,498, for Bottle Dropper and C10- sure, filed December 23, 1959, now Patent No. 3,135,302, and not further described here. Bottom wall 84 of container 82 has a pair of concentric flexible walls 86 and 88 extending upwardly therefrom of difierent heights, With the outer Wall being of a greater height. Walls 86 and 88 are positioned to enact with the tapered end of pipette 80, when the pipette is fully inserted within bottle 82 such as when fully threaded thereon to form a seal.

In a manner similar to that described above, the ingredients of the liquid composition are separated and one portion, such as a powder, placed in the space between walls 86 and 38 and pipette 89 inserted within bottle 82. Pipette 80 is forcefully urged downwardly sufl'iciently to form a seal between its tapered surface and walls 86 and 88. The bottle is filled with a measured amount of the remaining ingredients, in liquid form. A cap, not shown, is sealably mounted on the upper end of pipette 80 in a conventional manner and threaded on the bottle neck. To use, the cap is partially unthreaded thereby breaking the seal between walls 86 and 80 and pipette 80 and the bottle shaken to mix the ingredients.

An embodiment of the present invention useful both with and without a pipette is shown in FIGURE 7. A bottle 90 has a neck 92 and a wall 94 extending transversely below neck 92. Wall 94 has a central opening therethrough with an upwardly extending wall 96 about the circumferential edge of the opening for forming a volume or pocket 97. A closure 98 has a cap 100 for engaging the upper edge of neck 92, and a plug 102 which sealingly engages neck 92 when inserted therein. Plug 102 has a central extension 104 of'a diameter substantially the same as the opening in wall 94. Extension 104 is sealingly received within the opening in wall 94 when closure 98 is fully mounted on neck 92. Extension 104 is of such a length that it is removed from the opening in wall 94 when plug 102 is partially removed from neck 92. a

A measured amount of ingredients are placed in volume 9'7 and the remaining ingredients are measured in bottle 90 without any intermixing. Closure 98 is mounted on neck 92 with extension 104 sealing the opening in wall 94 and thereby preventing intermixing of the ingredients during storage.

To use plug 102 is partially removed thereby withdrawing extension 104 from the opening in wall 94. Inverting bottle 90 and shaking allows full mixing of the ingredients when the preparation is desired to be used.

While only a single pocket or volume was shown for separating two ingredients, various numbers of pockets.

can be formed by suitable radial walls within the annular space between the pipette wall and the pocket wall for 6 separating a plurality of materials, so that all the materials may be combined simultaneously upon partially removing the cap assembly from the neck of the container in a manner similar to that described above. Further while a dry material was shown placed in the pocket, a liquid may equally as well be used.

While the tapered surface in the bottom wall of the container shown in FIGURES 2-4 aids in the intimate dispersion and mixing of the ingredients upon breaking the seal, it is not necessary. If desired, the cylindrical wall forming the pocket and the pipette end of pipettes shown in FIGURES 2-5 could be of the same length, and the bottom wall could be flat and not be depressed as shown. However, it is convenient that the end of the pipette be as narrow as possible to provide easy accessibility to confined areas such as nose, ears, eyes etc.

The bottom wall is preferably molded of any suitable rigid material, such as any one of the many available appropriate synthetic organic resins. The bottom wall is positioned to make a fluid-tight seal with the lowermost edges of the pipette and pocket. For example, the bottom Wall may be molded of polyethylene, which provides the rigidity of structure which is highly desirable for providinga tight-sealing fit with the lowermost edges of the pipette and pocket without the use of auxiliary washers or gaskets.

A container assembly has thus been disclosed for use in separating the various ingredients of a liquid composition until ready to be used. This allows greater life to the end product and provides a fresh, ready to use, liquid composition. Further advantages are obtained by sealing the lower end of the pipette from. the liquid to prevent any egress of liquid into the bulb with consequent possible deterioration of the liquid or the bulb. Further, a simple way of preventing any tampering of the product prior to use is disclosed. The purchaser can easily determine if the bottle was ever opened by checking the dry material, since if this material is dry then the buyer can be certain that the container or bottle was never opened and the product is of full strength.

It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that various other changes may bernade in the construction of the container or pipette assembly without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention.

What is claimed is:

l. A liquid dispensing vessel having a threaded mouth and a bottom wall comprising a cap member having a depending cylindrical skirt portion provided with screw threads correspondingly engageable with the threaded mouth of said vessel, said cap member having an axis, a bulb sealably mounted to said cap, an axially extending first tube open at opposite ends, means mounting one end of said tube in airtight communication with said bulb, said tube having an outer diameter adjacent said one end substantially equal to the inner diameter of the vessel mouth for forming a fluid tight seal when inserted therein, a second tube disposed concentrically within said first tube and having one end outwardly flared, said flared end being sealably mounted on the inner surface of said first tube,the other end of said second tube havmg an opening therein and extending beyond the other end of said first tube and means on the bottom wall of said vessel responsive to tightening of said cap on said vessel neck for removably sealing said openings of said first and second tubes.

2. A liquid dispensing vessel according to claim 1 wherein said last mentioned means comprises cooperating grooves in said bottom wall for receiving the other ends of said first and second tubes in sealing engagement.

3. A liquid dispensing vessel having a mouth and adapted to have a bottom wall sealably mounted thereto, comprising a cap member having an axis, a bulb sealably mounted to said cap member, an axially extending first 7 I tube open at opposite ends, means mounting one end of said tube in air-tight communication with said bulb,

said tube having an outer diameter adjacent said one end substantially equal to the inner diameter of said vessel mouth for forming a fluid tight seal therewith, a second tube having one end flared and sealably mounted on said first tube, said second tube being disposed concentric to and adjacent the other end of said first tube, the other end of said second tube having a hole therein and facing the same direction as the other end of said first tube, and means on the bottom wall of said container adapted to be responsive'to tightening of said cap on said vessel neck for sealably engaging said opening of said first and second tubes when said bottom wall is mounted on said vessel. t

' 4. A liquid dispensing vessel according to claim 3 wherein said last mentioned means comprises cooperating grooves in said bottom wall-for receiving the other ends of said first and second tubes in sealing engagement.

5. A dropper assembly for a liquid containing vessel having a bottom wall and'which liquid is composed of a plurality of ingredients, comprising a compressible bulb, a tube having openings at both ends with one end hermetically sealed to said bulb and the other end adapted to be inserted into said vessel, a surface impermeable to said liquid sealably mounted on said tube and having portions spaced therefrom for defining a volume adjacent said other end, said surface having an opening therein facing the same direction as the opening in said other end of said tube and communicating with the interior of said volume, means cooperating with said assembly to provide a closure for said vessel, and means responsive to tightening of said closure upon said vessel for removably sealing said opening in said surface to isolate the interior of said volume from the interior of said vessel whereby an ingredient'of said liquid placed within said volume is isolated from the remaining ingredients of said liquid in said vessel until the assemblyis partially removed from said vessel.

6. A dropper assembly for use with a multi-ingredient liquid containing vessel having a neck and a bottom wall adapted to be sealably mounted for maintaining ingredients of the liquid separated until the liquid is to be used comprising a longitudinally extending tube open at opposite ends, one end of said tube having a spaced apart double wall defining a volume, said volume having an opening facing the same direction as said opening in said one end, a cylindrical cap member adapted to be placed up on said neck of said vessel to form a closure for said vessel, said cap mounted on the other end of said tube, a bulb mounted on said cap in hermetic sealed relation therewith, means carried by said cap and responsive to inserting said tube in said vessel for sealing said vessel neck, and means on said vessel bottom wall for sealing said openings in said one end of said tube to isolate said volume when said tube is fully inserted Within said vessel and said bottom wall is mounted in place. V 7. A dropper assembly for use with a multi-ingredient liquid containing vessel having a neck and a bottom wall adapted to be sealably mounted for maintaining the'ingredients of the liquid separated until the liquid is to be used comprising a longitudinally extending tube open at opposite ends, one end of said tube having a spaced apart double wall defining a volume, said volume having an opening facing the same direction as said opening in said one end, a cylindrical cap member adapted to be placed upon said neck of said vessel to form a closure for said vessel, said cap mounted on the other end of said tube, a bulb mountedon said cap in hermetic sealed relation therewith, and means carried by said cap and responsive to inserting said tube in said vessel for sealing said vessel neck, said bottom wall having an annular groove complementary to said one end of said tube and adapted to receive said one end to provide a liquid tight seal therebetween, and means overlying said opening of said volume and cooperating therewith to provide a liquid tight seal when said tube is fully inserted within said vessel and said wall is mounted in normal position.

8. A liquid dropper and cap assembly for a liquid containing vessel having a mouth comprising a bulb, a pipette adapted to be inserted into said vessel through the mouth and having one end sealably mounted to said bulb to provide a dropper assembly therewith, said pipette. having an opening in its other end, means cooperating with said dropper assembly upon substantial insertion in said vessel to provide a liquid tight closure for said vessel mouth, an impermeable surface sealably joined to said pipette and having portions thereof spaced from said pipette for defining a volume adjacent its other end bounded by said pipette and said surface, said surface having a passageway therethrough facing the same direction as said opening in the other end of said pipette and communicating with the interior of said volume, and means for removably sealing said passageway in response to inserting said pipette fully within said vessel.

9. A liquid dispensing container for separately maintaining ingredients of said liquid until ready for use, comprising a liquid dropper assembly and a vessel having a neck,.said dropper assembly comprising a closure cap adapted to be placed upon said vessel neck to form a closure for said vessel, a pipette having one end tapered, a bulb hermetically sealed to said cap, means hermetically and removably mounting said pipette to said cap, said vessel having a bottom wall with a pair of spaced apart concentric resilient walls extending upwardly therefrom and positioned to engage said tapered surface of said pipette, said. outer wall being of greater height than said inner wall, said walls adapted to sealably support said pipette when said pipette is fully inserted within said vessel for allowing other ingredients of said liquid to be received within said vessel, whereby an ingredient placed between said upstanding walls is isolated from the interior of said vessel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3976579 *Jul 10, 1975Aug 24, 1976Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNovel assembly
US3986962 *Jul 10, 1975Oct 19, 1976Becton, Dickinson And CompanyNovel assembly for separating blood
US4483439 *Feb 18, 1982Nov 20, 1984Wella AktiengesellschaftTwo-component packaging for pourable media
US4836370 *Feb 3, 1987Jun 6, 1989Steigmuhle Toss AgDual chamber container and method for forming an opening between the chambers of the container
US4917520 *Jan 4, 1989Apr 17, 1990Ginny ReidApplicator brush
US7434602 *Aug 3, 2006Oct 14, 2008University Of Medicine & Dentistry Of New JerseyDrip chamber dropper bottle
US8003053May 28, 2008Aug 23, 2011Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc.Liquid container with variable extraction chimney
US8153086Jul 5, 2011Apr 10, 2012Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc.Liquid container with variable extraction chimney
US20050113533 *Mar 31, 2004May 26, 2005General Electric CompanyHigh flow misible polycarbonate polyester composition
US20080029180 *Aug 3, 2006Feb 7, 2008University Of Dentistry And Medicine Of New JerseyDrip chamber dropper bottle
US20080299011 *May 28, 2008Dec 4, 2008Roche Diagnostics Operations, Inc.Liquid container with variable extraction chimney
US20090211927 *Feb 20, 2009Aug 27, 2009Wu Kuo ChengContainer structure for contain different beverages
US20090294397 *Dec 3, 2009Wu Kuo ChengContainer for contain different beverages
EP1998180A1 *May 31, 2007Dec 3, 2008F.Hoffmann-La Roche AgFluid container with variable flue
EP1998181A3 *May 27, 2008Feb 23, 2011F. Hoffmann-La Roche AGFluid container with variable flue
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Classifications
U.S. Classification141/24, 206/221, 215/DIG.800, 141/69
International ClassificationB65D51/28
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/08, B65D51/2857, B65D51/2864
European ClassificationB65D51/28B2A, B65D51/28B2