Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3139238 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 30, 1964
Filing dateDec 27, 1962
Priority dateDec 27, 1962
Publication numberUS 3139238 A, US 3139238A, US-A-3139238, US3139238 A, US3139238A
InventorsIven R Norstrud, John H Threlkeld
Original AssigneeBritt Tech Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cleaning apparatus with multiple and variable water supply
US 3139238 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J1me 1964 1. R. NORSTRUD ETAL CLEANING APPARATUS WITH MULTIPLE AND VARIABLE WATER SUPPLY Filed Dec. 27, 1962 m m R T my .1111 m m i 2 w mm 9 v M wm mad 3 I. E Ff SR 4 w. i a J mmw 4 w H w v .d "w W 8, D 6 ME RH a Z. 3 m. N" m P. 1 h m5 M 5 m 5 J a iC w Q R a f m 1 x a a Q P u 6 E E 4 R L 3 H M U v, M s0 4 N m f .6 M R Q 1 H w a h. H 2 M 1 l MQ W a m a F a wl F v M W W H w Wm. rh. L r l L 4 5 o 8 I 2 4 FIG. 2.

United States Patent 3,139,238 CLEANING AIPARATUS WITH MULTIPLE AND VARKABLE WATER SUPPLY Iven R. Norstrud and John H. Threlkeld, Britt, Iowa, assignors to Britt Tech Corporation, Britt, Iowa, a corporation of Iowa Filed Dec. 27, 1962, Ser. No. 247,612

5 (Ilaims. (Cl. 239-610) This invention relates to the field of liquid cleaning apparatus, and more particularly to the field of cleaning apparatus which is portable and uses a plurality of cleaning solutions.

Portable cleaning apparatus is particularly advantageous around service stations and garages where limited space and facilities are available, but nevertheless require means for cleaning the engines and other parts of automobiles, machinery and the like. In the present invention, apparatus is provided whereby water may be di rected under different pressures to the surface which is to be cleaned and the operator is also given a choice of cleaning solutions, either using a detergent or soap solution depending upon the type of surface to be cleaned.

It is therefore a general object of the present invention to provide new and improved cleaning apparatus using water, liquid detergents and soaps.

It is yet another object of the present invention to provide simplified control over the operation of the cleaning apparatus dispensing different liquids.

It is still another object of the present invention to provide new and novel cleaning apparatus having a plurality of water pressures available to be dispensed by use of a divided water source.

It is still another object of this invention to provide cleaning apparatus having solenoid operated valves in parallel water lines to simplify the cleaner construction.

It is still another objectof this invention to provide new and novel cleaning apparatus capable of delivering soap and detergent solutions and water under two different pressures.

It is yet another object of this invention to provide a new and novel means of connecting the water supply in parallel branches to give greater control over the amount of soap which is being dispensed.

These and other objects and advantages of this invention will more fully appear from the following description, made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a hydraulic schematic showing the general placement of the operating components; and

FIG. 2 is an electrical schematic of the cleaning apparatus.

A water line is connected to a source of water under pressure and for some systems it may be desirable to incorporate a water pressure regulator 11 to insure that the pressure is maintained at a pressure lower than the line pressure. Incorporation of the water pressure regulator 11 is not needed where a steady source of water pressure generally having a magnitude of 75 p.s.i. or less is used. A conduit 12 is connected between regulator 11 and a pair of conduits 13 and 14 which communicate with conduit 12. Conduit 13 is connected to a solenoid operated valve 15 and conduit 14 is connected to an adjustable valve such as a needle valve 16. Solenoid operated valve 15 has a coil 17 which when energized by electrical current causes an armature 18 to be attracted Within the magnetic field of the coil and thereby open valve 15. When coil 17 is not energized, valve 15 remains in a closed condition and does not allow fluid to pass therethrough. Adjustable valve 16 has a knob 19 or other suit- 3,139,238 Patented June 30, 1964 that the flow of fluid therethrough may be restricted to any one of a plurality of positions which is selected by the operator as will be explained later. Another solenoid operated valve 20 is connected to adjustable valve 16 by another section of conduit 14. Solenoid operated valve 20 is identical to valve 15 and has a coil 22 which when energized causes an armature 23 to be drawn into coil 22 and thereby open valve 20. Valve 20 is normally closed and remains so as long as coil 22 is unenergized. Conduits 13 and 14 are connected to the outlets of valves 15 and 20 respectively where they communicate with a common conduit 24 which is connected to an inlet 25 of a fluid pump 26. Also connected to the inlet 25 of pump 26 is another conduit 27 having its opposite end connected to a check valve 28 at its outlet. Check valve 28 is connected to a source of soap or solvent solution 29 through a conduit 30 which is generally a flexible section of hose which may be placed within a tank or container of the soap or solvent solution. In other words, the check valve is connected so that fluid may be drawn from source 29 but upon a given fluid pressure developing in conduit 27, check valve 28 closes and does not allow liquid such as water from conduit 24, to back up into the soap or solvent solution.

Pump 26 has an outlet 31 which is connected to a relief valve 32 at its inlet 33. Relief valve 32 also has an outlet 34 and a discharge port 35. Pump 26 is of the type that will permit fluid under pressure at its inlet to emerge from its outlet at the same pressure when not being driven. As will be explained more fully later, whenever relief valve 32 is energized, the fluid therein emerges through discharge port 35 until the pressure within the valve drops to a point where the valve closes. Pump 26 is driven by a motor 36 through a shaft to provide the necessary rotational power required by pump 26. A conduit 37 is connected to the outlet 34 of relief valve 32 and is shown in broken section, it being understood that conduit 37 may be of any convenient length to provide the operator with a nozzle 38 at a remote position from the rest of the apparatus. Nozzle 38 contains a discharge tube 39 which directs the flow of the liquid onto the Work to be cleaned and also contains five electrical push-button switches 40, 41, 42, 43, and 44. Switches 40 through 44 will be further explained in the electrical schematic found in FIG. 2. It is generally more convenient to connect the switches 40 through 44 to the rest of the apparatus through a two part plug connector 45.

Switches 40, 41, 42, 43, and 44 are generally formed in a bank and may be considered as a switch bank designated as numeral 46. This switch bank is composed of the several switches just mentioned which are mechanically linked through a linkage 47 so that when one pushbutton switch is depressed, if any other switch was previously depressed, it is snapped back to its original and deenergized position. Switch 40 is designated as the OFF position, switch 41 is the WATER position, switch 42 is the RINSE position, switch 43 is the SOAP position, and switch 44 is the SOLVENT position.

A plug 47 is connected to a volt alternating current line and a conductor 58 connected thereto is connected to one terminal of coil 22 and is connected to one terminal of coil 17. Conductor 56 is also connected to one terminal of a coil 59 of a motor relay 60 and is further connected to a contact terminal 61 of the relay. Another conductor 62, connected to plug 47, is connected through plug 45 to a'terminal of switch 41, to three terminals of switch 42, to a pair of terminals of switch 43, and to a single terminal of switch 44. Switch 41 has one contact blade, switch 42 has three contact blades, switch 43 has a pair of contact blades and switch 44 has a single contact blade as does switch 46. Switch as does not have any electrical contacts made with its terminals and merely serves the function of turning the entire system off as will be set forth in more detail. Conductor 62 is also connected to one terminal of pump motor 35 and the other terminal of pumpv motor 36 is connected to the armature of motor relay 60 through a conductor 63.

In order to apply power to motor 36 it is necessary thatv 44 was depressed, it will be seen that the pump is driven by motor 36 and since valves and remain closed, solvent will be drawn from source 29 and pumped to 'nozzle 38. Of course, all the relays may beenergized by low voltage simply by using a step down transformer if it is'desirable to operate the control switches by low voltage.

In case it is desirous of delivering soap through nozzle 38, SOAP push-button 43 is depressed and a terminal opposite that Connected to conductor 62 is connected by the Switchblade to solenoid 22 through a conductor 65.

Thus, water will be drawn through valve 20 and through valve 16, the amount depending upon the setting of adju'stable valve 16 and with conduit 39 in the soap solution, a mixture of water and soap will be drawn into pump 26 and dispensed through nozzle 38. Since the soap solution from source 29 maybe of different consistencies and since it may be desirable tochange the concentration of soap in the mixture, valve 1% may be adjusted by knob 19 to produce the optimum mixture for the cleaning job at hand.

Where it is desirable that water at line pressure be received at nozzle 58, WATER push-button 4,1 is depressed and. a terminal opposite the one connected with conductor 62 is connected to solenoid 17 of valve 15 through a conductor 65. Thus valve 15 is open to allow water to enter and leave pump 26 and upon a pressure build-up in conduit 27, check valve 28 is closed thereby stopping the water from diluting the soap solution and preventing any socp from entering the inlet to pump 26.

Should it be desirable to have water at a pressure several times line pressure, water is introduced into pump by actuating valves 15 and 2i) and this is accomplished by-depressing the RINSE push-button switch 42, whereconductor 66 is connected to a terminal opposite a terminal connected to conductor 62 so that current is applied to coil 17 of valve 15 and conductor 65 is connected to another terminal opposite a terminal connected to conductor 62 so that current is also applied to coil 22 of valve 2t Therefore, a full supply of water is received'at the inlet 25 of pump 26 and is discharged through its outlet 31 and hence through nozzle 38.

Inorder to stop the flow of any of the liquids from nozzle 33, it is only necessary that OFF push-button be depressed and any of the other switches which were depressed beforehand will be automatically returned to their off position'thereby' stopping the motor 36 and pump 26.

Whenever the pump is in operation, it will be seen that nozzle 33 is dispensing one of the liquids of the system, that is, either water, soap, or solvent and generally the liquid under pressure from pump 26 will not be affected in line or conduit 37. However, should nozzle 38 or discharge line 39 become clogged or any obstruction appear within conduit 37 or beyond, and the pressure within the line reach a predetermined value, relief valve 32 will be actuated. Upon relief valve 32 being actuated, the discharge port 35 will be opened and the fluid will be expelled from the discharge port until the pressure in l conduit 37 subsides and the relief valve is again returned to its unenergized state.

In operation, it will be seen that by depressing pushbutton switch 44 that a supply of solvent may be used to clean a particular area and depending upon the amount of water desired, puslrbutton switch 41 may be depressed to give Water at a pressure below that of the case where push-button switch 42 is energized which opens both solenoids in the parallel line from the source of water. By adiusting valve 16, soap may be dispensed at any given rate or any given consistency depending upon the type of cleaning job to be done.

From the foregoing description and drawings, it will be seen that acleaning apparatus has been disclosed which makes use of a parallel water system to the pump to provide soap in the proper consistency and water of the proper pressure. By the use of the invention disclosed the amount of soap being dispensed may be controlled by controlling the water to the mixture and different types of soap may be used by controlling the amount of water usedwith the mixture.

Itwill, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the parts without departing from the scope of this invention which consists of the matter shown and described herein and set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

1. In a cleaning apparatus:

(a) pump means having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, said pump means taking-liquid thereinto at its inlet and discharging such liquid through its out- '.let;

(it) how direction means connected to said pump out- .let for directing the flowof such liquid against a surface to be cleaned;

(c) a relief valve having a liquid inlet, outlet, and discharge port, said relief valve being energized by the pressure at said inlet exceeding a predetermined magnitude-to discharge such liquid through said port, and being deenergized by said pressure dropping below said predetermined magnitude to prevent discharge of such liquid through said port;

(d) a first conduit connected between said pump means outlet and said fiow directing means, said conduit having said relief valve disposed therein;

' '(e) a pair of conduits, each having a first end connected with said pump means inlet and each having a second end adapted to be connected to a source of liquid under pressure;

(f) an adjustable valve disposed in one of said pair of conduits for restricting the flow of such liquid into said pump means by a predetermined amount;

(g) a pair of control valves disposed in each of said pair or" conduits, said valves allowing such liquid to flow therethrough in one position and'shutting oh the flow in another position;

(h) a check valve allowing fluid to flow in one direction only;

(i) a fourth conduit connected to said pump means inlet and adapted to be connected to a source of liquid cleaner, said fourth conduit having said check valve disposed therein allowing such liquid cleaner to be drawn from said source;

(j) and a plurality of control elements constructed and arranged to be carried by said flow directing means, said plurality of control elements being operably connected to said pair of' control valves whereby said pair of control valves may be simultaneously opened I and closed and controlled individually.

2. The invention as set'forth in claim 1 wherein said pair of control valves are opened and closed electrically and said plurality of control elements include electrical switching apparatus, said switching apparatus having electrical contacts for energizing said pair of control valves are to be dispensed, otherwise deenergizing said control valves.

3. In a cleaning apparatus:

(a) pump means having a liquid inlet and a liquid outlet, said pump means taking liquid thereinto at its inlet and discharging such liquid through its outlet;

(b) flow direction means connected to said pump outlet for directing the flow of such liquid against a surface to be cleaned;

(c) a relief valve having a liquid inlet, outlet, and discharge port, said relief valve being energized by the pressure at said inlet exceeding a predetermined magnitude to discharge such liquid through said port, and being deenergized by said pressure dropping below said predetermined magnitude to prevent discharge of such liquid through said port;

(d) a first conduit connected between said pump means outlet and said flow directing means, said conduit having said relief valve disposed therein;

(6) a pair of conduits having a first common end connected with said pump means inlet and having a second common end adapted to be connected to a source of water under pressure;

(f) an adjustable valve disposed in one of said pair of conduits for restricting the flow of such water into said pump means by a predetermined amount;

(g) a pair of solenoid operated valves disposed in each of said pair of conduits, said valves allowing such Water to flow therethrough in one position and shutting off the flow in another position;

(h) a check valve allowing fluid to flow in one direction only;

(i). a fourth conduit connected to said pump means inlet and adapted to be connected to a source of liquid detergent cleaner and a source of liquid soap, said fourth conduit having said check valve disposed therein;

(j) electrical power means;

(k) and a plurality of controlelements carried by said flow directing means, said plurality of control elements being operably connected between said 6160-, trical power means and said pair of solenoid operated valves and said pump means, a first or" said control elements applying power to said pump means only, a second of said control elements applying power to said pump means and said solenoid operated valve disposed in the same conduit as said adjustable valve, a third of said control elements applying power to said pump means and both of said solenoid operated valves, a fourth of said control elements applying power to said pump means and said solenoid operated valve disposed in the conduit not containing said adjustable valve, and a fifth con- 5 trol element disengaging any of said first, second, third, and fourth elements thereby disengaging said power means.

4. In a cleaning apparatus:

(a) pump means having a liqud inlet and a liquid outlet, said pump means taking liquid thereinto at its inlet and discharging such liquid through its outlet;

(b) flow direction means connected to said pump outlet for directing the flow of such liquid against a surface to be cleaned;

(c) relief valve means having a liquid inlet, outlet, and

discharge port, said relief valve means being energized by the pressure at said inlet exceeding a predetermined magnitude to discharge such liquid through such port, and being deenergized by said pressure dropping below said predetermined magnitude for passage of such liquid from said inlet through said outlet;

(d) first conduit means connected between said pump means outlet and said flow directing means, said conduit means having said relief valve means disposed therein;

(e) a pair of conduit means having one of their ends connected with said pump means inlet and having their other ends adapted to be connected to a source of liquid under pressure;

(7) control valve means disposed in each of said pair of conduits, said valve means having different size openings allowing such liquid to flow therethrough at different rates of flow in one position, and shutting off the flow in another position;

(g) valve means allowing fluid to fiow in one direction (it) conduit means connected to said pump means inlet and adapted to be connected to a source of liquid cleaner, said conduit means having said last named valve means disposed therein allowing such liquid cleaner to be drawn from said source;

(1') and a plurality of control means carried by said 7 flow directing means, said plurality of control means being operably connected to said control valve means whereby at least one of said control valve means may be opened and closed.

5. The invention as set forth in claim 3 wherein said adjustable valve disposed within one of said conduits is adjusted to provide the proper restriction within said conduit to provide reduced pressure within said fourth conduit and allow such liquid soap to be drawn into said pump means with such water.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2831729 *Jun 18, 1956Apr 22, 1958Walker Truman DSpotting apparatus
US3058668 *Oct 7, 1960Oct 16, 1962Oren B HarmesCleaning apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3207165 *Dec 23, 1963Sep 21, 1965Dyna Co IncWashing apparatus for alternatively supplying cleaning solution and rinse fluid
US3322350 *Dec 14, 1964May 30, 1967Heinicke Instr CompanyMobile washing apparatus for vehicles or aircraft having chemical mixing means therein
US3348774 *Mar 18, 1965Oct 24, 1967Gyromat CorpSemi-automatic color change system for paint spray installation
US3351284 *Jul 8, 1965Nov 7, 1967Air ReductionMethods of operating burners and improved burners
US3369705 *May 9, 1966Feb 20, 1968Curtis Dyna Prod CorpPlural source cleaning apparatus having fluid actuated diaphragmtype proportioning valve
US4167193 *Oct 11, 1977Sep 11, 1979Magnus Harve WApparatus for cleaning jet engine nozzles
US4438731 *Jan 26, 1982Mar 27, 1984Mercor CorporationFlow control system
US4848384 *Jan 30, 1989Jul 18, 1989Staley Electric CompanyMotor vehicle washing system with automatic sequencing of different cleaning liquids
US4915119 *Apr 21, 1986Apr 10, 1990Dober Chemical CorporationCleaning apparatus and method
US4926514 *Jan 18, 1989May 22, 1990Biac Holding AgMethod of and apparatus for removing stains from soiled areas of a plannar textile article
US5282889 *Apr 7, 1992Feb 1, 1994Dober Chemical CorporationMethod for cleaning a piece of equipment
US5353821 *Oct 22, 1993Oct 11, 1994Dober Chemical CorporationCleaning apparatus and method
US5449009 *Sep 30, 1993Sep 12, 1995Sherwood Medical CompanyFluid disposal system
US5507305 *Jul 25, 1994Apr 16, 1996Franklin; Robert V.Cleaning apparatus and method
US5595201 *Dec 5, 1994Jan 21, 1997Dober Chemical Co.Apparatus and methods for automatically cleaning multiple pieces of equipment
US5637103 *Mar 17, 1993Jun 10, 1997Kerwin; Michael J.Fluid collection and disposal system
US5736098 *May 11, 1995Apr 7, 1998Sherwood Medical CompanyMethod for a servicing fluid disposal system
US5775592 *May 16, 1996Jul 7, 1998Suttner America CompanyUpstream inlet injector
US5803101 *Sep 11, 1996Sep 8, 1998Cdc Products, Inc.Portable drain cleaning apparatus
US5996597 *May 26, 1998Dec 7, 1999Cdc Products, Inc.Portable drain cleaning apparatus and pressurized gas cartridge usable therewith
US6299035Oct 13, 2000Oct 9, 2001Hydro Systems CompanyRemotely activated dispenser
US6488675Oct 15, 1999Dec 3, 2002Fred R. RadfordContaminated medical waste disposal system and method
US6745782Feb 11, 2002Jun 8, 2004C.H.O.C.S., Inc.Systems and methods for cleaning oxygen lines
US20040200506 *Apr 30, 2004Oct 14, 2004C.H.O.C.S., Inc.Systems and methods for cleaning oxygen lines
EP0899027A2 *Aug 25, 1998Mar 3, 1999GARDENA Kress + Kastner GmbHMethod of operating a high pressure device, in particular a high pressure cleaner, and high pressure device
EP1595606A1 *May 13, 2004Nov 16, 2005Financière ClairacWashing lance with integrated control device and washing system equipped with such a lance
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/310, 134/36, 134/95.1, 137/599.1, 222/133, 239/317, 239/578, 134/99.2, 239/414
International ClassificationB08B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB60S3/044, B05B9/01, B08B3/028, B05B12/14, B08B3/026
European ClassificationB08B3/02H2, B08B3/02H