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Publication numberUS3140020 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 7, 1964
Filing dateAug 23, 1961
Priority dateAug 23, 1961
Publication numberUS 3140020 A, US 3140020A, US-A-3140020, US3140020 A, US3140020A
InventorsMartin Spier I
Original AssigneeBeacon Plastic & Metal Prod
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container closure assembly
US 3140020 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 7, 1964 1. M. sPu-:R 3,140,020

ACONTAINER CLOSURE ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 23, 1961 3 Sheebs-Sheet 1 lll/lll 'lll'. 1111/ INVENTOR. 1 'l' E' l2'. Mam-m 5915:?

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A frog/Vey July 7, 1964 1. M. sPlr-:R 3,140,020

CONTAINER CLOSURE ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 23, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 VIII/lll INVENTOR 4R L', MAQr/N SP/QQ BY 5M Man/M* @www Anny/V675 July 7, 1964 l. M. SPIER 3,140,020

CONTAINER CLOSURE ASSEMBLY Filed Aug. 23, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR I, MAr/N SPIE? United States Patent O 3,140,026 CONTAINER CLOSURE ASSEMBLY I. Martin Spier, New York, N.Y.,` assignor to Beacon Plastic 8; Metal Products Inc., New York, N. a corporation of New York Filed Aug. 23, 1961, Ser. No. 133,454 13 Claims. (Cl. 222-517) This invention relates to improvements in dispensing container closures, and in particular relates to closures of the type wherein a member may be turned between positions in which it respectively blocks and unblocks a dispensing opening.

Closures of the above type have many applications. By way of example, a container for powders may have an apertured top wall and a cap rotatably mounted on said top wall and having further apertures which may be moved into and out of registration with the rst aperture by turning the cap.

One object of this invention is to provide an improved closure assembly including a turnable member of the above-described type, having automatic means for returning the turnable member from an open or dispensing position to a closed position.

Another object of this invention is to provide an assembly having said automatic return means, which assembly does not require the use of conventional springs, and which is economical and easy to manufacture.

In accordance with preferred embodiments of the invention, I provide a container closure assembly comprising a irst member having a dispensing opening. This first member may be a container or receptacle, or alternatively may overlie and be screwed or otherwise secured to the top of a container. The assembly also comprises a second member. A socket is xed to one member, and a pintle is iixed to the other member and is non-rotatably received in the socket. Accordingly, the two members are in opposed facing relation, with the second member normally blocking the dispensing opening.

As an important feature of the invention, at least one out of said socket and said pintle is twistable so as to permit manual turning of said second member relative to said irst member to unblock the dispensing opening. Furthermore, the twistable element is resilient so as automatically to return the second member to aperture blocking position upon release thereof.

The invention is particularly suitable for molding the parts out of plastic. Thus, the socket may be molded integrally with one member, and the pintle may either be molded integrally with the other member or attached thereto by a further socket. If the first-mentioned socket is to be twistable, the member with which it is molded may be made of polypropylene, for example, with the socket being thin-walled so as to be twistable. Rigid parts may be made of polystyrene, for example. In any event, the molding and assembly operations are minimal.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, my invention comprises certain novel constructions, combinations, and arrangements of parts as will be hereinafter fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a rst embodiment of the invention in which the socket is twistable;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken along the line 2-2 of FIG. 1 and illustrates the positions of the internal parts when the assembly is in a closed position with the cover member of the assembly shown in phantom lines;

FIG. 3 is a view similar to FIG. 2, but illustrates the positions of the internal parts when the assembly is in open position with the cover member of the assembly shown in phantom lines;

'ii@ Patented July 7, 1964 ice FIG. 4 is a fragmentary, sectional view taken along the line 4 4 of FIG. 2 and illustrates the twistable socket in its unstrained position;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary, perspective view and illustrates the twistable socket in its unstrained position;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5, but illustrates the twistable socket in a strained position;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 4, but illustrates a second embodiment of the invention with a twistable pintle in its unstrained position;

FIG. 8 is a view similar to FIG. 6, but illustrates the second embodiment of the invention with the twistable pintle shown in strained position;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary, sectional view of a third embodiment and illustrates the assembly in a closed unstrained position as a cover device to be used in conjunction with a jar or like container;

FIG. 10 is a plan View of the third embodiment and shows the cover in its closed position;

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 10, but shows the cover in its open position;

FIG. 12 is a perspective sectional view of a fourth embodiment and shows the cover in its closed position;

FIG. 13 is a view similar to FIG. 12 but shows the cover in its open position;

FIG. 14 is a View similar to FIG. 12, but shows a fth embodiment;

FIG. 15 is a View similar to FIG. 12, but shows a sixth embodiment.

FIGS. 1-6

In the first embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1-6, there is provided a container closure assembly comprising a'rst member or base member 110, which serves as a receptacle. The main portion of the receptacle includes a bottom wall 111 and an upstanding peripheral side wall 112. This side wall 112 conforms to the major portion of a cylinder in shape with an interruption at one point. At the center of bottom wall 111, the receptacle is provided with an upstanding socket 113. Optionally and preferably, socket 113 is integral with bottom wall 111. At the opening of the cylindrical portion of side wall 112, receptacle 110 is provided with an extension in the form of a generally V-shaped extension 119 of wall 111, and a corresponding pair of side walls 117 and 118 extending upwardly from said extension wall 119 and serving themselves as respective extensions of side wall 112. Preferably, the junction of walls 117 and 118 is rounded and wall 119 is correspondingly rounded. The top of base member or receptacle 110 is open, with the opening bounded by walls 117 and 113 defined as a dispensing opening and being designated by the reference numeral 121.

In accordance with this embodiment, socket 113 and base member 11i) are molded integrally out of a plastic, such as polypropylene, in such a way that the container is relatively rigid, but the socket 113 is twistable and resilient. While the socket and receptacle may be of the same gauge, it is also possible in the molding operation to make the socket of thinner gauge than the rest of the container in case it is desired to enhance the rigidity of the container and at the same time impart the desired flexibility to the socket. In the normal unstrained condition of the socket, it is optionally square in cross section with its walls 113' extending vertically upwardly from the bottom wall 111. In any event, the socket has a pre-set normal condition.

The assembly also comprises a second member or cover 114. Cover 114 has a main top wall portion 130 which is generally circular in shape, and a depending peripheral wall 125 which is part cylindrical in shape and which extends turnably around side wall 112. Pintle extends vertically downwardly from the center of top wall 130 and is, optionally and preferably, integral with said top wall 130. In this embodiment, by way of illustration, cover 114 may be rigid and may be molded integrally of a plastic such as polystyrene. Said pintle 115 is optionally square in cross section and in any event preferably has the same cross section as socket 113. Cover 114 has an extension 120 of substantially the same shape as bottom wall extension 119 and shaped to overlie and cover dispensing opening 121 in the normal position of cover 114. Pintle 115 extends non-rotatably into socket 113. Optionally, any suitable means may be employed to assemble pintle 115 into socket 113. Thus, the intert of the two parts may be entirely frictional. Alternately, pintle 115 may have a bead 115a extending around the periphery thereof, and the walls 113' of socket 113 may have a corresponding groove 113a extending around the periphery thereof, on their inner faces. In assembly, pintle 115 may be inserted into socket 113 and forced downwardly until bead 115a snaps into groove 113a. Optionally, in this position, the bottom of pintle 115 may be spaced slightly above the bottom of socket 113. Optionally, in the assembled position of pintle 115 and socket 113, top wall 130 bears frictionally against the upper edge of side wall 112, and extension 120 bears frictionally against the top edges of walls 117 and 118. The top wall 130 is somewhat springy, and the relative positions of bead 115a and groove 113a may be such as to slightly depress the center of top wall 130 in the assembled positions of the parts, thereby insuring that the desired frictional intert between the cover and the receptacle wall be maintained.

In the normal condition of the assembly, as shown in FIGS. l, 2, 4 and 5, the socket is unstrained and has its normal square cross sectional shape, and the cover extension 120 overlies and blocks dispensing opening 121. In this position, optionally, one end of cover side wall 125 abuts wall extension 11S to serve as a stop against rotation in one direction of the cover. Also, in the normal condition of the parts, the other end of the cover side wall 125 is spaced from wall extension 117.

In order to dispense pills or other objects 140 contained within the receptacle, cover 130 may be turned in a clockwise direction, as viewed from above, to its position shown in FIG. 6 and in broken lines in FIG. 3. The flexible and twistable socket 113 thereby becomes deformed, as is clearly shown in FIG. 6, so as to permit the turning action of the cover.

As the twisting force applied is increased, the extent of the rotation of the cover is increased. Thus, by a selective application of twisting force, the cover may be rotated to a position in which the dispensing opening 121 is unblocked thereby permitting removal of the contents of the assembly. Upon release of the cover 114 in its twistably deformed and strained position, due to the resilient nature of the socket 113, the socket 113 returns to its normal pre-set unstrained condition, causing the pintle 115 to undergo a similar return, and also resulting in a return of the cover to its normal, closed position, blocking the dispensing opening 121, thereby preventing spilling or further removal of the contents.

FIGS. 7-8

In this embodiment, cover 230 corresponds to cover 130 of the first embodiment. Bottom wall 211 corresponds to bottom wall 111. The two embodiments are similar, except for the means connecting the two members. Socket 213 on wall 211 is similar to socket 113, except that socket 213 is preferably rigid.

Socket 222 depends from the center of top wall 230 in axial alignment with socket 213. Also, the cross section of socket 222 and 213 are similar, being preferably of square cross section. Preferably, the sockets are molded integrally to the walls from which they are respectively mounted of a rigid plastic, for example, polystyrene.

Pintle 215 corresponds generally to pintle and connects top wall 230 and bottom wall 211 by means of sockets 222 and 213 respectively. The lower end of pintle 215 is inserted non-rotatably into socket 213 and the upper end of pintle 215 is inserted non-rotatably into socket 222. Preferably, pintle 215 is of similar crosssection to the sockets. Pintle 215 is secured to the socket 213 by means of a bead-groove arrangement 215:1, 213a, which corresponds to bead 115a and groove 113a. The pintle is secured to socket 222 by means of a peripheral bead 215b proximate to the upper end of the pintle which snaps into a socket groove 213b when pintle 215 is inserted into socket 222. A slight space exists between the bottom of pintle 215 and bottom wall 211 and between the top of pintle 215 and the top wall 230, respectively (FIG. 7).

Preferably, pintle 215 is molded of polypropylene so that it is llexible and which allows the pintle to be twisted. In its normal pre-set condition, pintle 215 has a normal unstrained preferably square shape and the assembly is in a closed position. To open the assembly in order to dispense its contents, the cover 230 is turned in a clockwise direction as viewed from above. Pintle 215 twists and is distorted thereby permitting the cover turning action, as shown in FIG. 8. Upon releasing the cover in its open position, the pintle 215 returns to its normal pre-set condition because of its resilient nature and causes the cover to return to its closed position which prevents the removal of or spilling of the contents.

FIGS. 9-11 In this embodiment, the invention serves as a cover for a jar or like container. The closure assembly is provided with a base member 310 having a top wall 323 from which a generally cylindrical peripheral side wall 312 depends. The inner surface of side wall 312 is provided with threads 324 to permit the assembly to be screwed to the top of a jar or container. A boss 340 protrudes outwardly of side wall 312 and extends along the entire height of the side wall. A bore 341 preferably of square cross section passes vertically through the boss 341B defining a socket having walls 322.

Top wall 323 is provided with a centrally located aperture 321, preferably circular. Optionally and preferably, boss 340 is integrally molded with base member 31) of polystyrene which lends it a desired rigidity. The closure member is provided with a second member or cover 314 having a slightly arcuate surface, downwardly concave. The cover is of a general rain-drop shape. A pintle 315 depends from the narrow end of the rain drop. Pintle 315 is of similar cross section to that of the socket bore 341 and is adapted to be inserted into the bore. A lug 342 depends from the pintle end spaced from the cover. rihe base of the lug adjacent to the pintle end and spaced from the cover is of greater cross sectional area than the pintle. Preferably the pintle and lug are integrally molded to the cover of a polypropylene material, with the pintle and lug being of lesser gauge so that they achieve a desired flexibility while the remainder of the cover is rigid. To secure the cover member to the base member, pintle 315 is inserted into the socket bore 341 thereby causing the lug 342 to be compressed. Pintle 315 is forced down until the lug 3412 pops out of the bottom end of the bore and firmly embraces the bottom surface of boss 340 thereby securing cover 314 to base member 310.

In its normal closed position, the cover portion of the top wall 323 overlies the apertures 321 thereby blocking the aperture and preventing the outflow of contents from the container. Further, the pintle has an unstrained and preferably square cross section.

To open the cover in order to dispense the contents of the container, the cover is turned, either clockwise or counterclockwise. The pintle 315 being flexible is twistably deformed and permits the cover turning action. FIG. 11 shows the cover 314 turned to a position that unblocks the aperture 321 and which permits removal of the contents of the jar or container. In the open position of the closure assembly, as in its closed position, the peripheral edge 343 of the cover frictionally bears against the upper surface of the top wall 323 due to the interfit of the pintle and socket. The contact between the cover and the top wall, however, does not prevent turning the cover to its open position from its normal closed position. Nor does the contact prevent the cover from returning to its normal closed position upon being released from its open position. This is caused by the pintle which returns to its pre-set normal condition because of its resilient nature.

Optionally, base member 310 may be provided with an eccentrically located upwardly extending protrusion 328 which is preferably molded integrally with the base member. In addition, cover 314 is optionally provided with a slight upward cavity 329 that extends upwardly into the cover from its lower surface. Cavity 329 and protrusion 328 are complementary and positioned so that when cover 314 is twisted to its open position protrusion 328 snaps into cavity 329 and maintains the assembly in its open dispersing position.

To close the cover, it is tapped slightly so that the protrusion 328 is jarred out of cavity 329. The resistance to the resilient pintle being removed, the pintle returns to its normal pre-set unstrained condition, causing the cover automatically to return to its closed aperture blocking position.

FIGS. 12-13 This embodiment of the invention serves as a cover closure assembly for jars or like containers. The assembly is provided with a base member 410 having a top wall 423 from which a cylindrical peripheral side wall 412 depends. The inner surface of side wall 412 is provided with threads 424 which permit the assembly to be screwed to the top of a jar or container.

A hollow cup-like depression 455 depends from the center of top wall 423 having side walls 450 that incline downwardly towards the center of the depression, and a bottom planar wall 422 parallel to top wall 423. Preferably, side wall 45t) of the depression is similar to the frustrum of a cone and bottom wall 422 has a circular periphery.

An aperture 451, preferably square, extends through the bottom wall 422 at its center thereby defining the bore of a socket, bottom wall 422 defining the walls of said socket. A second aperture 421 is eccentrically located -on the top wall 423. Optionally, the second aperture 421 is of circular design.

Preferably, the depression 455 and the remainder of a base member 410 are integrally molded of polystyrene which imparts the required rigidity to these parts.

The closure assembly is provided with a second member or cover 414 having a top wall 427 from which a peripheral cylindrical side wall 425 depends. A pintle 415 depends from the center of the top wall of similar cross section to the depression bottom wall aperture 451 and corresponds to pintle 315. A lug 442 corresponds to lug 342. Preferably, pintle 415, lug 442 and cover 414 are rnolded of polypropylene with the pintle and lug being of smaller gauge so that they achieve a degreeof flexibility whereas the rest of the cover remains rigid. To secure the cover 414 to base member 410, pintle 415 is inserted into the depression bottom wall aperture 451, causing the lug 442 to be compressed. Upon further downward insertion of the pintle, the resilient lug pops out of the aperture 451 and embraces the under surface of depression bottom wall 422. This causes the cover to bear frictionally against the base member, cover top wall 427 and side wall 425 respectively overlying base member top wall 423 and side wall 412. The contact between the cover and the base member, however, does not prevent relative sliding movement between them. An aperture 426, of identical cross section to aperture 421, is eccentrically located on cover top wall 427 at a radial distance from the center of the cover top wall identical to that which aperture 421 was located from the center of base member top wall 423.` In the closed position of the assembly, with the pintle 415 in its normal preset unstrained condition and preferably of square cross section, the aperture 426 is displaced circumferentially from aperture 421, so that the apertures are blocked. Aperture 421 is blocked by cover top wall 427 and aperture 426 is blocked by base member top wall 423. This prevents the removal of the contents from the jar.

To open the jar in order to dispense its contents, the cover top member is turned counterclockwise as viewed from above, until the apertures 421, 426 are brought into registration. FIG. 13 clearly shows the closure assembly in its open dispensing position. Pintle 415 being liexible, twists and distorts thereby permitting the turning action of the cover. As noted above, despite the cover being in frictional contact with the base member, it is able to be rotated into the open position.

To close the cover, it need only be released from its open position and it returns to the closed position with the apertures blocked thereby preventing the removal of the contents from the jar. The resilient nature of the pintle causes it automatically to return to its pre-set normal unstrained condition thereby causing the desired cover return action. Once again, the frictional contact between the cover and the base meber in no manner interferes with the movement of the cover.

FIG. 14

This embodiment of the invention serves as a cover closure assembly for jars or like containers. Cover member 514, pintle 515 and lug 542 correspond generally to cover member 414, pintle 415 and lug 442 except that the former are integrally molded of polystyrene which imparts to them a desired rigidity. On the other hand, cover 414, pintle 415 and lug 442 are integrally molded of polypropylene which lends them a greater degree of flexibility. In addition, top wall 523, base side wall 512, and depression 550 correspond to base top wall 423, base side wall 412, and depression 450 except that the former are integrally molded of polypropylene whereas the latter were integrally molded of polystyrene. The significant addition to this embodiment is collar 552. Collar 552 having a preferably rectangular cross section extends vertically upwardly from the center of the base member depression bottom wall 522 but is of lesser height than the depth of the depression so that the collar does not extend to the level of the top wall 523. Bore 553 identical to aperture 551 which corresponds to aperture 442, extends the entire height of the collar and collar wall 552 thereby defines a socket. Accordingly, aperture 551 and bore 553 are preferably of square design and adapted to receive pintle 515 which is of similar cross section.

Preferably, socket 552 is molded integrally with depression 555, the remainder of base member 510 of polypropylene, but a socket 552 and depression 555 are of smaller gauge, which lends them a degree of flexibility while the remainder of the base member is rigid.

To secure cover 514 to base member 510, a procedure similar to that by which cover 414 was was secured to base meber 410 is followed. Namely, pintle 515 is inserted into bore 553 and forced downwardly until lug 542 pops out and firmly embraces the lower surface of depression bottom wall 552. The cover member 514 frictionally bears against the base meber 510, except for the upper end of socket 552 which, because of its height, remains spaced from the top wall. As shown in FIG. 14, cover top wall 514 and cover side wall 525 respectively overlie base member top wall 523 and base mem- "j ber side wall 512. The frictional Contact between the base and cover, however, does not prevent one sliding relative to the other.

In the closed position of the closure assembly, the socket is in its normal pre-set unstrained condition, its cross section being rectangular. Also, the apertures 521, 526, corresponding to apertures 421, 426, are circumferentially offset and blocked thereby preventing the removal of the contents of the jar.

To open the assembly in order to dispense the contents of the container, the cover is turned counterclockwise until the apertures 521, 526 are brought into registration, unblocking the apertures and allowing removal of the contents. Also socket 552 and depression 555, due to their flexible nature, sustain a twisting deformation which allows the cover turning action.

To close the assembly, the cover is released in its open position and it automatically returns to its closed position with the apertures 521, 526 blocked, preventing the removal of the contents of the jar.

The automatic return action of the cover is caused by the socket and depression which, due to their resilient nature, return to their normal pre-set unstrained condition.

FIG. 15

This embodiment of the invention serves as a cover closure assembly for jars r like containers. Cover member 614 corresponds identically with cover member 514. Also, base member top wall 623, side wall 612, and depression side wall 650 correspond identically to base member top wall 523, side wall 512 and pression side wall 550.

The significant addition to this embodiment resides in its connecting means. Base member depression bottom wall 6212 is planar, parallel to top wall 623, and preferably of circular design. The first component of the connection means, pintle 615, rises vertically upwardly from the center of bottom wall 622 having preferably a rectangular cross section. Lug. 642 is mounted upon the upper end of the pintle spaced from the depression botom wall 622. The cross sectional area of the lug adjacent to the upper end of the pintle spaced from the depression bottom wall exceeds the cross sectional area of the pintle. Also, the height of pintle 615 in combination with lug 642 is less than the depth of the depression so that the combination does not reach the level of the base member top wall 623.

Preferably, lug 642 and pintle 615 are integrally molded to the remainder of the base number of polypropoylene with the pintle, lug and depression being of lesser gauge, thereby giving them a flexible nature while the remainder of the base member remains flexible.

The second component of the connecting means, a cylindrical projection in concentric relationship to cover side walls 625 having side wall 660 and a bottom wall 661 depends from the center of cover top wall 627. An aperture 662 is located in the center of projection bottom wall 661 having a cross section similar to pintle 615 and positioned to receive said pintle. Preferably, the projection bottom and side walls are integrally molded to the remainder of cover 614 of polystyrene.

To secure cover 614 to base member 612 pintle 615 is inserted upwardly into cover projection bottom wall aperture 662. Upon further upward insertion lug 642 pops out of aperture 662 into the interior of the projection and firmly embraces the upper interior surface of projection bottom wall 661 thereby causing the cover 614 to bear frictionally against the base member 610 with the cover top wall 627 and side wall 625 respectively overlying the base member top Wall 623 and side wall 612. The projection side wall 660 being of greater height than the height of the lug, the lug upper edge is spaced from the cover top wall. Further, the projection side and bottom walls are adapted to permit the projection to t within the hollow of base member depression 655 clearingly of depression side Wall 650.

In its closed position pintle 615 is in its normal pre-set unstrained condition, its periphery being rectangular. Also, apertures 621, 626, corresponding to apertures 521, 526, are circumferentially offset and blocked thereby preventing the removal of the contents of the jar.

To open the assembly in order to dispense the contents of the container, the cover is turned counterclockwise until the apertures 621, 626 are brought into registration, unblocking the apertures and allowing removal of the contents. Also, pintle 615 and depression 655 are twistably deformed and strained due to its exible nature thereby permitting the cover turning action.

The cover is returned automatically to its closed position from its open position by releasing the cover in the latter position. The resilient pintle and depression return to their normal pre-set condition thereby causing the return of the cover.

From the foregoing it is thought that the construction, operation and many advantages of the device will be apparent to those skilled in the art without further description, and it will be readily appreciated that changes in the size, shape, proportions and minor details may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the accompanying claims.

What I claim is:

1. A container closure assembly comprising a first member having a first wall having a dispensing opening, a second member having a second wall, a socket fixed to said wall of one of said members and having a socket axis transverse to said wall of said one of said members, a pintle having an end xed to said wall of the other of said members and having a pintle axis transverse to said Wall of said other of said members, said pintle rigid in axial dimension, means non-rotatably fixedly mounting said pintle in said socket with said axes aligned and said walls thereby in fixedly spaced opposing parallel relation, said members having cooperating means whereby said second member normally blocks said opening, at least one out of said pintle and said socket being sufficiently resilient torsionally so as to permit turning of said members relative to each other about said aligned axes while maintaining said fixedly spaced opposing parallel relation of said walls, said members being cooperatively shaped so that said second member thereby unblocks said opening, said one out of said pintle and said socket being pre-stressed sufficiently so as automatically to return said members to their normal positions upon release thereof.

2. A container closure assembly in accordance with c laim l, said pintle being resilient, said socket being rigid.

3. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 1, said pintle being rigid, said socket being resilient.

4. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 2, said socket being integral with said wall of said one of said members.

5. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 3, said pintle being integral with said wall of said one of said members.

6 A container closure assembly in accordance with claim l, said pintle fixed to said wall of the other of said members by means of a socket, said sockets being rigid, said pintle being resilient.

7. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 6, said sockets being integral with their respective walls of said members.

8. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim l, said assembly adapted for application to the threaded mouth of a jar, one of said members having an integrally threaded mounting ring.

9. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 8, said second member having a dispensing opening, said dispensing openings being positioned so that in said normal position of said second member said openings are out of registration, said dispensing openings being further positioned so that upon turning of one member relative to the other, said openings are brought into registration.

10. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 9, said pintle being resilient, said socket being rigid.

11. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 9, said pintle being rigid, said socket being resilient.

12. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 9, said threaded member having an integral socket and said other member having an integral pintle.

13. A container closure assembly in accordance with claim 9, said threaded member having an integral pintle and said other member having an integral socket.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 22,441 Mayall Dec. 28, 1958 1,264,543 Mroczek Apr. 30, 1918 1,668,658 Reutter May 8, 1928 1,702,998 Foltis Feb. 19, 1929 2,187,927 Ayotte Jan. 23, 1940 2,907,502 Lang Oct. 6, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US22441 *Dec 28, 1858 Boob-spuing
US1264543 *Nov 16, 1917Apr 30, 1918Adam MroczekCover for boilers.
US1668658 *Aug 27, 1926May 8, 1928Scovill Manufacturing CoPowder box
US1702998 *Sep 10, 1927Feb 19, 1929Anestis FoltisClosure for collapsible tubes
US2187927 *Jan 25, 1939Jan 23, 1940Joseph ReneDevice for dispensing liquids, granulated products, and the like
US2907502 *Apr 29, 1957Oct 6, 1959Gen Mills IncBallast discharge device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3362590 *Oct 7, 1965Jan 9, 1968Gene MartinCarafe
US3490756 *Jan 4, 1966Jan 20, 1970Bacon Plastic & Metal ProductsTorsion bar assembly and method for manufacturing the same
US4078702 *Oct 14, 1976Mar 14, 1978Pennwalt CorporationAutomatically re-closing a closure difficult for children to open
US5865352 *Sep 13, 1996Feb 2, 1999Leary; Cornelius F.Bottle with rotational dispenser
US6161737 *Feb 2, 1999Dec 19, 2000Leary; Cornelius F.Bottle with rotational dispenser
US6439441 *Dec 19, 2000Aug 27, 2002Cornelius F. LearyBottle with rotational dispenser
US6547102 *Apr 11, 2001Apr 15, 2003Courtesy CorporationSwivel top closure
US7137527 *Nov 3, 2003Nov 21, 2006Kotobuki & Co., Ltd.Container
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/517, 222/557
International ClassificationB65D43/16, A47G19/24, B65D47/04, B65D47/26, A47G19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/265, A47G19/24, B65D43/165
European ClassificationA47G19/24, B65D43/16C1A, B65D47/26D4