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Publication numberUS3140711 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 14, 1964
Filing dateDec 31, 1962
Priority dateDec 31, 1962
Publication numberUS 3140711 A, US 3140711A, US-A-3140711, US3140711 A, US3140711A
InventorsMcgathey Wendell Harry
Original AssigneeMcgathey Wendell Harry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device
US 3140711 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 14, 1964 w. H. M GATHEY KINESTHEITIC THERAPEUTIC EXERCISING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 31, 1962 INVENTOR \A/ENPELL HAK/Q/ fi kml/Ey Z ZN d f ATTORNEYS July 14, 1964 W. H. M GATHEY KINESTHETIC THERAPEUTIC EXERCISING DEVICE Filed Dec. 31, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORN EYS y 1964 w. H M GATHEY 3,140,711

KINESTHETIC THERAPEUTIC EXERCISING DEVICE Filed Dec. 31, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR (UEI OIFL L 7 44 Md United States Patent 3,140,711 KII'QESTHETIC THERAPEUTIC EXERCISING DEVICE Wendell Harry McGathey, 374 George St., Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada Filed Dec. 31, 1962, Ser. No. 248,639 7 Claims. (Cl. 128-33) The present invention relates to a kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device. More specifically this invention relates to a device having a platform which vibrates extremely rapidly in a plurality of directions, as will be explained hereinafter, on which a person undergoing treatment stands, and a second rapidly vibrating apparatus provided with handles for such person to grasp.

It is an object of this invention to provide a device wherein a person being treated thereby is subjected to rapid minute vibrations through his entire body.

It is a further object of this invention to provide an apparatus adapted to subject a person undergoing treatment to rapid minute vibration throughout his entire bone structure and radiating out through the body tissues.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide an apparatus whereby a person undergoing treatment is subjected to two independent sources of rapid vibrations, one such source being a platform on which a person stands, the other source emanating from handles which such person grasps.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide a kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device wherein a person undergoing treatment thereon is seated on a chair or stool through which rapid vibrations are transmitted.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device comprising in combination a base, a pedestal mounted on one end of said base, a platform on said base adjacent said pedestal, a plurality of resilient mounts between said base and said platform maintaining said platform in spaced relationship from said base, a lower motor casing fixedly mounted on said platform, a plurality of resilient mounts within said casing supporting a motor and maintaining said motor in spaced relationship from said lower casing, two eccentric weights axially mounted on said motor, said pedestal having an internally projecting mount member fixedly attached thereto near the upper end thereof, resilient mounts on said mount member, an upper motor casing mounted on said last named motor mounts and projecting upwardly from said pedestal, a plurality of resilient mounts within said upper motor casing supporting a motor and maintaining said motor in spaced relationship from said casing, a motor hood fixedly attached to the upper periphery of said pedestal, encasing said upper motor and its casing in spaced relationship, and a pair of handles fixedly attached to said motor casing and being diametrically opposed thereon, said handles projecting through said motor hood, resilient lips on said motor hood through which said handles project in spaced relationship, and two axially mounted eccentric weights on said last named motor, and control switches on said pedestal controlling both of said motors.

In devising the present invention it was a primary object to provide a kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device which creates rapid minute vibrations which are transmitted to the bone structure of a patient and thence outwardly through the patients complete body. Vibrations created by the present invention have been found to be extremely beneficial in stimulating blood circulation and in improving muscular development, as well as in providing dramatic relief for painful joints and for muscular ailments.

3,149,711 Patented July 14, 1964 Reference will now be made to the drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a side plan view in partial cross-section of an apparatus according to the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side plan view of the upper portion of an apparatus according to the invention.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken along line 33 in FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view along line 4-4 in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along line 5-5 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a front plan view of a back-rest.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged sectional view of a resilient mount;

FIGURE 8 is a diagrammatic view of the path of travel of eccentric weights according to the invention;

FIGURE 9 is a top plan view of a motor casing closure;

FIGURE 10 is a front plan View of an apparatus according to the invention with a patient (shown in broken lines) standing thereon;

FIGURE 11 is a top plan view of a back rest.

More detailed reference will now be made to the drawings.

In FIGURE 1, a base 10 is supported by fixedly attached rubber legs 11 and 12 and corresponding legs 11a and 12a (not shown). A plurality of resilient support members 13, 14, and 15 resiliently support a platform 16. As will be appreciated from FIGURE 3, resilient supports are provided on both sides of pltaform 16, and in FIGURE 3 resilient supports 15 and 15a may be seen. Similarly, rubber base legs 11 and 11a are visible in FIGURE 3.

Referring again to FIGURE 1, a motor casing 17 is fixedy attached to platform 16, and as seen in FIGURE 3, casing 17 houses a motor 18 which is resiliently supported within casing 17 by a plurality of resilient motor supports 19. Mounted on motor axle 20 is eccentric weight 21, one of two such weights as will be explained hereinafter. A hollow upright pedestal 22 is fixedly mounted on one end of base 10. Near the upper end of pedestal 22 is a mount member 23, fixedly attached to pedestal 22. A plurality of resilient motor mount members 24 are provided on motor support 23, and a motor casing 25 is mounted on said resilient mount member 24. A motor hood 26 is fixedly attached at 28 to pedestal 22. As is more evident in FIGURE 3, a motor casing 25 is provided with fixedly attached handles 29 and 30 projecting therefrom and being diametrically opposed on motor casing 25.

As is seen in FIGURE 2, the side of hood 26 is provided with a closure 33 having a flexible inner lip 33a through which handle 29 projects. A space 3312 exists circumferentially between both handles 29 and 30 and closures 33. A rubber lip 33a is mounted in an interior flange on motor hood closure 33.

Handles 29 and 30 may be insulated by rubber or plastic hand grips, or may be of any suitable metal, ridged for firm grip as illustrated.

The motor mounts supporting platform 16 on base 10 and supporting motor casing 25 on mount member 23 are illustrated in FIGURE 7, wherein flexible rubber mount 43 has vulcanized to its lower and upper ends bolts 44 and 45 respectively. Bolt 44 of mount 43 is shown in FIGURE 1 to be bolted to motor support member 23, while bolt 45 on the upper surface of resilient rubber mount 43 is threadably engaged in an internally threaded projection on the underside of platform 16.

Suitable control switches 34 and 34a are conveniently located on pedestal 22, and these switches control motors 18 and 25 so that both motors may be operated simultaneously or independently, and also to control the speed of both motors, and a further switch 34b controls the period of operation of both motors.

Referring now to FIGURES 4 and 5, motor 18 and its casing 17 are illustrated in enlarged view. Eccentric weight 21, mounted on support arm or finger 21a is affixed to wheel mount 36 which-in turn is held on motor axle 20 by set screw 36a. In FIGURE 5, eccentric weights 21 and 38 are illustrated in approximately 90 relationship, eccentric weight 30 being adjustably affixed to axle 20 by wheel mount 38a in the same manner as eccentric weight 21. 7 While motor 18 is in operation it will be realized that when eccentric weights 21 and 38 are positioned as shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, rapid vibrations are caused. It will be further understood that such weights are axially adjustable on motor axle 20 through simple adjustment of attachment wheel 36 andset screw 36a in the case of eccentric Weight 21 and attachment wheel 37 and a corresponding set screw (not shown) in the case of eccentric weight 38. The extent of vibration may therefore be increased by adjusting eccentric Weights 21 and 38 between 180 and At 180 there will of course be little or no vibration while maximum motor vibration is obtained when eccentric weights 21 and 38 are at 0.. The intensity of the vibrations may also be varied by adjusting the position of weights 21 and 38 on support fingers 21a and 38a, respectively, by means of set screws 21b and 38b in weights 21 and 38 respectively. Increased motor speed will also increase the intensity of the vibration.

As-illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5, motor 18 is supported at its top and at its bottom by a plurality of resilient motor mounts 19. In effect motor mounts 19 are divided into four pairs 19a, 17, c, and d, and are spaced at four equal intervals around motor casing 17, thus'supporting motor 18 at its top and at its bottom at four equally spaced points around the circumference of motor 18.

In FIGURE 4 it will be seen that cooperating indentations are provided on the exterior of motor 18 and on the interior of motor casing 17, adapted to receive motor mounts 19.

As seen in FIGURES 4 and 9, bottom closure 4-0 of motor casing 17 is provided with four'projecting. fingers 41a, [1, c and d which are equally spaced around the periphery thereof and are adapted to press against motor mounts 18a, 12, c, and d. Bottom closure 40 may be conveniently aifixed to casing 17 by means of screws 42a, b, c, and d spaced intermediate fingers 41a, b, c, d.

Referring again to FIGURE 4, cooling fan 35 on the underside of motor 18 provides for air circulation around motor 18 through orifices 46 in closure 14 on the bottom of motor casing 17, through a space around the motor rotor (not shown) to the top of motor 18, and thence downwardly between the space around .the periphery of motor 18 and motor casing 17. Alternatively, orifices 47 may be provided in the upper surface of motor casing 17 underneath a cap 48 so that fan 35 will draw air underneath cap 48 through orifices 47 and thence downwardly around motor 18 in the space between motor casing 17, and finally exhaust such air through orifices 46 in bottom closure 40.

Similarly upper motor 25a is. supported within casing 25 by resilient mounts and is provided with a cooling fan in the same manner as motor 18.

The therapeutic device described herein permits a very low platform16, which may be as low as three inches or less from the floor, does not necessitate mechanical connections between the motor vibration means and the vibrating platform or handles, and provides penetrating vibrations unlike all known devices. A patient standing on platform 16 is subjected to vibrations which ,travel through the bones of the feet and thence through the leg bones and to the trunk and head and through the body tissues, while the vibrations emitted by handles 29 and 30 travel through the bones of the hand and the arms to both 1 the trunk and the head and, again, through the body tissues.

As is illustrated in FIGURE 8 the motor vibration follows a path 39 which is of 'four directions illustrated by arrows 47 and 48. The resistance of motor mounts 19 causes the motor, under the influence of its eccentric weights to follow a regularpath around motor mounts 19.

A patient standing or sitting on platform 16 and grasping handles 29 and 30 will thus be subjected to a plurality of motions, from platformle and handles 29 and 31). The entire body is thus subjected to intense rapid vibration with a resultant stimulation to blood circulation, nerves and body tissues. v

If desired, suitable recesses maybe provided in platform 16 to receive the legs of a chair so that a patient may be seated on a chair or stool on platform 16 either facing handles 29 and 30 or facing away from these handles. The vibrations of platform 16 received from its vibrating motor 18 will be transmitted directly through the legs of such chair to the trunk of the person seated thereon. In either event vibrations will be transmitted throughout the entire body of the patient, both through the trunk to the head and arms, and through the trunk to the extremity of the legs.

A back rest 49 is illustrated in FIGURES 6 and 11, which is adapted to engage recesses in the ends of handles 29 and 30 by fingers 50 and 51' on spring arms 52 and 53 respectively. Back rest portion 54 is tiltably affixed to arms 52 and 53 and may be adjusted to a plurality of positions thereon to suit the comfort of a person sitting on a stool on platform 16 and resting his back on back rest portion 54. Back rest 54 may be fabricated of any suitable material and will preferably have a thin sponge rubber lining.

The intensity of the vibrations caused by the motors 18 and 25 may be adjusted in five ways: firstly, the speed of the motor will affect the intensity of the vibrations, secondly adjustment of the angle between the eccentric weights will have a similar effect. Thirdly, the relative position of the eccentric weights to the axis of the motor will affect the intensity of the vibrations and the position of the weights on the axle of the motor will have a corresponding effect. Finally, variations of the mass of the eccentric weights will affect the intensity of the vibrations. It is proposed that all of the five variants will be readily adjustable, especially for use in various applications where this machine is employed.

The foregoing is by way of example only and the invention should be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

l. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device comprising in combination a base, a pedestal mounted on one end of said base, a platform on said base adjacent said pedestal, a plurality of resilient mounts between said base and said platform maintaining said platform in spaced relationship from said base, a lower motor casing fixedly mounted on said platform, a plurality of resilient mounts within said casing supporting a motor and maintaining said motor in spaced relationship from said lower casing, two eccentric weights axially mounted on said motor, said pedestal having an internally projecting mount member fixedly attached thereto near the upper end thereof, resilient mounts on said mount member, an upper motor casing mounted on said last named motor mounts and projecting upwardly from said pedestal, a plurality of resilient mounts within said upper motor casing supporting a motor and maintaining said motor in spaced relationship from said casing, a motor hood fixedly attached to the upper periphery of said pedestal, encasing said upper motor and its casing in spaced relationship, and a pair of handles fixedly attached to said motor casing and being diametrically opposed thereon, said handles projecting through said motor hood, resilient lips on said motor hood through which said handles project in spaced relationship, and two axially mounted eccentric weights on said last named motor, and control switches on said pedestal controlling both of said motors.

2. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device according to claim 1 said motors being provided with cooling means within said motor casings and suitable orifices in said casings to provide a ready flow of air.

3. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device as defined by claim 1 including wheel mounts adjustably connected to the axles of both said motors, fingers extending from said wheel mounts and set screws mounting said eccentric Weights in pre-selected longitudinal position on said fiingers.

4. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device according to claim 1 in which said resilient mounts within said upper and lower motor casing each comprise resilient rubber members equally spaced around the periphery of each of said motors, four near the top and four near the bottom thereof, said members being equally spaced around the periphery of each of said motors.

5. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device according to claim 1 including a back rest pivotally supported by said handles in front of said pedestal above said base.

6. A kinesthetic therapeutic exercising device according to claim 1 in which said resilient mounts supporting said platform and said upper motor casing have threaded extensions vulcanized to both ends thereof, said threaded extensions engaging said base and said platform and said projecting mount member and said upper motor casing.

7. The combination as defined by claim 1 wherein said motor casing includes interior grooves and wherein said motors include exterior indentations, said resilient motor mountings being mounted in said grooves and indentations.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,349,743 Meyer May 23, 1944 2,566,484 Coury Sept. 4, 1951 2,687,717 Murphy Aug. 31, 1954 2,980,109 Schcin Apr. 18, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2349743 *Dec 3, 1942May 23, 1944Exhibit Supply CoVibratory apparatus
US2566484 *Oct 4, 1949Sep 4, 1951Louis G CouryVibrator machine
US2687717 *Jun 19, 1952Aug 31, 1954Owen K MurphyCushion type motor operated kinesitherapy device
US2980109 *Jan 18, 1960Apr 18, 1961Imp Electronics IncVibratory passive exerciser
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3494353 *Dec 4, 1968Feb 10, 1970Frederick MarichReciprocating vibratory massaging device
US3762402 *Nov 17, 1971Oct 2, 1973S AbramovitzFoot massaging machine
US5716331 *Feb 4, 1997Feb 10, 1998Chang; Li-HsiaMassage device having a motor for vibrating and reciprocating a massage pad with protrusions
US6027432 *Mar 16, 1998Feb 22, 2000Cheng; Chau YangExercise bicycle
US6217491Jan 13, 1999Apr 17, 2001Hans SchiesslDevice for stimulating muscles
US6551220 *Sep 14, 1999Apr 22, 2003Kurt Manufacturing Company, Inc.Exercise resistance device with magnets
US6659918Dec 13, 2000Dec 9, 2003Hans SchiesslDevice for stimulating muscles
US6945916Apr 21, 2003Sep 20, 2005Kurt Manufacturing Company, Inc.Exercise resistance device with magnets
US7402145 *Jun 9, 2004Jul 22, 2008Woggon Dennis AMethod of neuromusculoskeletal proprioceptive re-education and development of a living body using corrective chair and vibration
DE1566479B *Dec 13, 1967Jul 1, 1971Atwell Charles FrancisDoppeltwirkendes Nervenreflex-Massagehandgeraet
Classifications
U.S. Classification601/49, 601/70
International ClassificationA61H23/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61H2023/029, A61H1/005, A61H2203/0406, A61H23/0263
European ClassificationA61H1/00D, A61H23/02R2