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Publication numberUS3142465 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 28, 1964
Filing dateJun 11, 1962
Priority dateJun 19, 1961
Publication numberUS 3142465 A, US 3142465A, US-A-3142465, US3142465 A, US3142465A
InventorsGustaf Hellner Karl
Original AssigneeGustaf Hellner Karl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Supporting means for bags or sacks
US 3142465 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 8, 1964 K. G. HELLNER 3,142,465

SUPPORTING MEANS FOR BAGS 0R SACKS Filed June 11 1962 F161. ]I |I|Hl1.. ullllllllll INVENTOR. 7 Karl Gustajellner United States Patent 3,142,465 SUPPORTING MEANS FOR BAGS 0R SACKS Karl Gustaf Hellner, Vastgotagatan 9, Alingsas, Sweden Filed June 11, 1962, Ser. No. 201,569 Claims priority, application Sweden June 19, 1961 3 Claims. (Cl. 248-97) This invention relates to supporting means or stands for paper bags or sacks, and particularly for those of the kind used for the collection of rubbish or other waste. At suitable points of collection these stands are positioned and the same support the sacks and hold the mouths of the same open for the reception of the deposited material.

A sack-supporting stand of this character as presently known, consists of a holding ring provided with attachments for engaging the upper end of the bag or sack. Sometimes these attachments include a hinged cover extending over the upwardly-directed mouth of the sack. The holding ring at the top of the sack is sometimes provided with means by which it can be attached to a wall or other support, but more often the stand includes a bottom which rests on the ground or floor and which has one or more uprights extending from it to carry the holding ring.

When a sack located in one of these supporting stands is opened, it is cylindrical at the top, with a gradual transition toward the canister bottom with two opposed ends. Such ends are connected to the cylindrical mouth portion of the sack and the two parallel sides of the sack have an oblique transition upwardly to the cylindrical top. The transition from the straight sides at the bottom of the sack to the cylindrical formation at the top, forms flat inclined surfaces with semi-elliptical outlines.

The unsupported, non-vertical parts of the sack are especially liable to damage from sharp objects. They also have a tendency to drag the sack down and separate it from its attachment to the holding ring when the sack is heavily loaded.

It is an object of the invention to provide a stand of the kind described above, which eliminates the abovementioned disadvantages. The invention is characterized chiefly by the fact that the bottom portion of the stand has two supporting surfaces which diverge upwardly, the lower ends of such surfaces being fastened at the bottom of the stand, with the upper ends thereof being fastened to upright members of the stand. With such an arrangement, the fiat inclined surfaces of the sack rest against and are supported by these divergent surfaces. This takes the load from off the bag-supporting attachments at the upper end of the sack and it materially reduces the likelihood of damage to the sack. As a result, a lighter grade of paper, or a bag composed of fewer plies can be used for the sack.

With these and other objects to be hereinafter set forth in view, I have devised the arrangement of parts to be described and more particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto.

In the accompanying drawing, wherein an illustrative embodiment of the invention is disclosed:

FIG. 1 is a front elevational view of a sack or bag-supporting stand as constructed according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a vertical sectional view, taken along the line 11-11 of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows, and

FIG. 3 is a sectional View, taken substantially on the line IIIIII of FIG. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawing, 1 indicates a base ring which, in the form shown, is composed of metallic tubing, although it may be otherwise constructed, and it is provided at the bottom with a plurality of angle-pieces 2, three or four of which may be used, and which constitute supporting feet for the stand. Extending vertically upward from the base ring are two uprights 3 which constitute rigid upward extensions of the base ring 1. Attached to the upper end of these uprights 3 is a one-half section 4 of the holding ring or bag support. The second half 5 of the ring is attached, by means of a hinge 6 to the fixed ring half 4. It is desirable to form the holding ring of two hingedly-connected parts since this facilitates the changing of sacks, but a one-piece ring or annulus may be used if desired.

The base ring 1 supports a bottom member 7 which may be of basket mesh and which is mainly of flat form. The bottom of the sack rests against this bottom. Two supporting wire mesh surfaces 8 extend obliquely upwardly from the bottom 7 to the uprights 3. The angle of inclination of these supporting surfaces 8 is substantially the same as that at which the corresponding parts of the sack naturally hang. These supporting surfaces 8 have semi-elliptical edges, the circular horizontal projection of which corresponds to the shapes of the portions of the sack which are disposed against these surfaces when the sack is full. Each of the surfaces 8 is thus substantially the shape of one-half of an ellipse. These supporting surfaces 8 should be constructed with a sturdy edging and the tops of the surfaces should be fastened to the uprights 3, so that they are thus of considerable strength and capable of supporting the sack and resisting its deformation under the load of its contents. The rear of the meshbasket bottom member 7 should be provided with a vertical cross piece 9, which joins the supporting surfaces 8 and which serves as a locating element for the new sack when a filled sack is replaced.

Various means may be employed for fastening the sack in the holding ring 5. For example, the sack can be placed inside of the ring and its upper edge folded over the ring and wedged tight through the use of a retainer ring placed around the holding ring and over the part of the sack extending thereover.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that a bag support is provided by which the lower portion of the bag, and particularly the angular side portions thereat, are congruent to angular supporting surfaces which act immeasureably to prevent distortion of the bag as well as its rupture by heavy materials which might be placed within it.

Having thus described a single embodiment of the invention, it is obvious that the same is not to be restricted thereto, but is broad enough to cover all structures coming within the scope of the annexed claims.

What I claim is:

1. A stand for supporting a sack for rubbish and the like comprising, a bottom ring, a top ring, posts extending between the rings and holding the same in spaced-apart relation, a mesh bottom supported on the bottom ring, said mesh bottom including a pair of upwardly-inclined, upwardly-divergent wings of semi-elliptical shape having their upper ends respectively attached to the posts, the wings defining a wedge-shaped space between them and adapted for congruent engagement with lower portions of a sack placed in the stand and supported at its upper end by the top ring.

2. A stand for supporting a sack for receiving rubbish or other material, said stand having means at its top for holding a sack upright and with its mouth disposed upwardly, the stand having a bottom, a pair of supporting surfaces extending angularly upward from the bottom and diverging from said bottom, said surfaces terminating below the bag-supporting means, vertical supports extending between the bottom and the bag-supporting means, the supporting surfaces being attached at their upper ends to the vertical supports which are braced by the upper parts of said supporting surfaces, said supporting surfaces being effective to serve as supporting elements for the lower parts of the sack and prevent outward deformation of the same.

3. A stand for supporting a sack for receiving rubbish or other material, said stand having means at its top for holding a sack upright and with its mouth disposed upwardly, the stand' having a bottom, a pair of supporting surfaces extending angularly upward from the bottom and diverging from said bottom, said surfaces terminating below the bag-supporting means, vertical supports extending between the bottom and the bag-supporting means, said supports being fastened at their lower ends to the stand, the supporting surfaces being attached at their upper ends to the vertical supports which are braced by the upper parts of said supporting surfaces, said supporting surfaces being effective to serve as supporting elements for the lower parts of the sack and prevent outward deformation of the same.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1140867 *Dec 18, 1911May 25, 1915Bates Valve Bag CoBag-filling machine.
US2084492 *Sep 14, 1936Jun 22, 1937August Raymond RochteBag cleaning or emptying device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3352520 *Apr 22, 1965Nov 14, 1967Homeline CorpBag holder
US3373963 *Aug 4, 1965Mar 19, 1968Jolene SnellBag holding device
US3598350 *Jul 30, 1969Aug 10, 1971Westmoreland Mfg CoBag holder
US4407474 *Aug 28, 1981Oct 4, 1983International Paper CompanyPlastic sack holder
US5035438 *Jun 4, 1990Jul 30, 1991Cronquist Tom AGull wing cart apparatus
US7222825 *Mar 10, 2004May 29, 2007Jeffrey GilbertLawn waste bag holder
Classifications
U.S. Classification248/97, 211/12, 248/99
International ClassificationB65B67/00, B65B67/12
Cooperative ClassificationB65B67/12
European ClassificationB65B67/12