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Publication numberUS3144687 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1964
Filing dateApr 6, 1960
Priority dateApr 6, 1960
Publication numberUS 3144687 A, US 3144687A, US-A-3144687, US3144687 A, US3144687A
InventorsJohn J Owens, Francis C Skalko
Original AssigneeOwens Corning Fiberglass Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method for forming and processing textile fibers and filamentary materials
US 3144687 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

g- 13, 1964 F. c. SKALKO ETAL 3,144,637

METHOD FOR FORMING AND PROCESSING TEXTILE FIBERS AND FILAMENTARY MATERIALS Filed April 6, 1960 INVENTORS FRANCIS 6. Jmura 6 Jaw J Own/.5

gizwaww g ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3 144 687 METHOD FOR FtlklvlllfiG AND PROCESSING TEX- TILE FIBERS AND FILAMENTARY MATERIALS Francis C. Slralko, Pawtucket, R.I., and John J. Owens, Greenville, S.C,, assignors to Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation, Toledo, (lhio, a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 6, 1960, Ser. No. 20,419 11 Claims. (Cl. 19145.5)

This invention relates to the formation and processing of textile fibers and filamentary materials and more especially a method of blending staple fiber with a linear fibrous body or strand of filaments for producing a composite textile strand or yarn.

Textile fibers or filaments have been formed by attenuating streams of heat-softened materials such as glass, filament forming resins or the like at high linear speeds to form fine fibers or filaments which are gathered into strand formation and collected by winding same into a package preparatory to further processing the strand or filamentary material to yarns or other linear form' It has been found that a linear body or strand of glass fibers for certain textile purposes may be enhanced with advantageous characteristics of other fibrous materials by combining the body or strand with staple fiber.

The present invention has for an object the provision of a method of admixing, blending or commingling staple fiber with continuous filaments or a linear fibrous body to produce a composite linear body whereby advantageous characteristics of staple fiber are attained in a linear body endowed with high strength characteristics.

Another object of the invention resides in a method of forming a composite linear yarn-like material embodying fibers or filaments formed of glass or other heat-softenable material which, concomitantly with their formation, are blended with a linear fibrous body or staple fiber, the admixture or blend being oriented into a composite linear body for textile uses.

Another object of the invention resides in a method involving forming filaments or fibers from heat-softenable material by attenuation and concomitantly advancing a filamentary or fibrous body, commingling the filamentary or fibrous body and fibers to form a composite linear fibrous structure having improved strength characteristics and decorative motif, particularly for use in fabricating textiles where bulk yarn characteristics are desirable.

Another object of the invention resides in a method including advancing a linear bundle of filaments, temporarily dispersing the filaments into open pattern formation and commingling or combining fibers or a fibrous body with the dispersed filaments and compacting the commingled filaments and fibers or fibrous body to produce a composite yarn-like structure.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a thread-like body formed of filaments attenuated from heat-softenable materials commingled and compacted with fibers of different materials to form a linear yarnlike body or product endowed with characteristics of both materials and improving dimensional stability as well as the affinity of the product for dyes.

Another object of the invention resides in an apparatus or structural arrangement comprising means arranged to attenuate heat-softenable material to form fibers or filaments, and embodying means for commingling the fibers or filaments with fibers or a fibrous body of different material and compacting the commingled materials to form a composite linear body wound upon a collector in package form.

Another object of the invention is the provision of an apparatus embodying a means effective to open a linear multifilament body in combination with means for deliver- 3,144,687 Patented Aug. 18, 1964 ing staple fiber or a fibrous body into the open pattern of filaments whereby to orient the commingled materials into a composite strand or yarn-like body.

Another object of the invention resides in a method of forming a composite linear body wherein a strand of continuous newly formed filaments, such as filaments formed of glass or other heat-softenable material, is opened to disperse the filaments in an open pattern or network and staple fiber or linear fibrous material delivered into the region of the open pattern or network of filaments and the admixture or blend of filaments and fiber or fibrous material oriented into a composite linear body or product particularly suitable for textile uses.

Further objects and advantages are within the scope of this invention such as relate to the arrangement, operation and function of the related elements of the structure, to various details of construction and to combinations of parts, elements per se, and to economies of manufacture and numerous other features as will be apparent from a consideration of the specification and drawing of a form of the invention, which may be preferred, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a semidiagrammatic view illustrating one form of apparatus for carrying out the method of the in vention to produce the novel product;

FIGURE 2 is a semidiagrammatic View of a modified form of apparatus for carrying out the method of the invention;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 showing another method of commingling filamentary and fibrous materials; and

FIGURE 4 is a semidiagrammatic view illustrating another form of apparatus for carrying out the method of commingling or blending fibers, filaments or fibrous materials together.

The method and apparatus of the invention have particular utility in commingling or blending filaments or fibers formed of heat-softenable materials, such as glass or fiber-forming resins, with filaments, fibers or linear fibrous bodies formed of other materials, such as asbestos, ceramic fibers, fibers of nylon, vinyl copolymers, acetate, cotton, wool, sisal, or other fibers of natural or synthetic materials, the commingled materials being compacted or oriented into a composite linear yarn-like body or novel product having improved strength characteristics and readily adaptable for decorative motif derived through particular characteristics of filaments or fibers of the dif ferent materials, the composite linear yarn-like body being suitable for fabricating textiles and the like.

In one phase of the method, a linear body of filaments is acted upon to disperse or separate the filaments in an open pattern or network and staple fiber introduced into the zone of separated filaments whereby the filaments and staple fiber are combined or commingled to form a composite filamentary structure.

Another phase of the method relates to the introduction of a thread-like linear fibrous body into the zone of separation of the filaments and orienting or blending the filaments and fibrous body into a composite filamentary structure or product. The method embraces the blending or commingling of newly formed fibers or filaments of heat-softened material with a linear fibrous body adjacent the region of formation of the fibers or filaments and compacting the commingled materials into a composite linear product.

Referring to the drawings in detail, and initially to the apparatus illustrated in FIGURE 1, the filamentary constituent or component is formed of continuous filaments attenuated from heat-softened material, such as glass or filament forming resin. As illustrated in FIGURE 1, a forehearth or feeder 10 is adapted to contain or be supplied with heat-softened glass or other heat-softened ma-- terial, the lower wall 12 or floor of the feeder or forehearth being formed with a plurality of depending projections or tips 14, each fashioned with an orifice.

Streams 16 of the heat-softened material flow through the orifices. The streams 16 are attenuated at a comparatively high linear speed to form comparatively fine continuous filaments 18. In the arrangement illustrated in FIGURE 1, the filaments 18 are converged into a multifilarnent strand or linear group 20 under the influence of a guide or filament gathering surface 22, the strand being directed through the nip region of a pair of pull rolls 24 mounted upon arbors 25 which are rotated at identical speeds by suitable power transmission and a motor (not shown) to advance the strand 20.

By advancing the strand 29 at high speed, the streams 16 are attenuated to the filaments comprising the strand. Means is provided to effect a separation of the filaments of the strand or opening of the strand so that the filaments are temporarily dispersed in an open pattern or open network. Disposed beneath and in the path of the advancing strand 20 is a deflecting surface 27 of a plate or member 28 arranged at an angle with respect to the path of movement of the strand.

The strand impinging on the deflecting surface 27 is projected therefrom in a different direction dependent upon the relative angularity of the deflecting surface of member 28 with respect to the path of incidence of the strand 20.

The effect of the impingement of the multifilament strand against the deflector 28 is' to disperse or separate the filaments into an open pattern at the region 29. The arrangement illustrated in FIGURE 1 includes means for feeding staple fiber into the region 29 of the open pattern of continuous filaments adjacent the deflecting means or plate 28 to commingle or blend the staple fiber with the continuous filaments. The filaments and staple fiber are advanced through a compactor or condenser 30 which compacts or orients the materials into a composite linear body, product or filamentary structure 32 which is wound upon a sleeve or collector 34 to form a wound package 36.

In the embodiment illustrated, a shaft or arbor 38 is supported by arms 40 pivotally joined with supports 41 and mounted by a housing 42. The housing 42 contains means for driving or rotating the sleeve 34 and in the embodiment illustrated includes a driven roll 44 rotated by a suitable motor (not shown), the roller contacting the periphery of the package for rotating the sleeve and package at the desired speed to accumulate or collect the composite linear product 32.

The linear body or filamentary structure 32 is traversed lengthwise of the sleeve 34 to form an elongated package by means of a conventional strand traverse 46 which is reciprocated to effect distribution of the product as the package is formed.

The condenser or compactor 30 is of a tubular configuration and serves to fold in the staple fibers and cornpact the commingled fibers and filaments of the strand. The compactor 30 may be provided with an angularly disposed tube 48 adapted to be connected with a source of compressed air whereby to direct a jet of air into the compactor 30 to assist in folding or integrating the staple fibers into the multifilament strand as the filaments are progressively converged during movement through the compactor 30.

A form of means or system for delivering staple fiber for blending or commingling with the multifilament strand is illustrated at 50. The staple fiber feed arrangement includes a hopper or other receptacle 52 adapted to contain staple fiber 54 or other fibrous material to be blended or integrated with the multifilament strand 20. The hopper is fashioned with a chamber 56 in which is rotatably mounted a fiber feeding means or wheel 53 provided with a plurality of radially arranged blades or vanes 60 mounted upon a shaft 62 driven by a motor 64 through the medium of pulleys and a driving belt 66.

The motor 64 is of the variable speed type for controlling the rate of feed of the staple fiber by controlling the speed of rotation of the feed wheel 58. It is to be understood that other forms of variable speed drive for the fiber feed may be employed for the purpose. The arrangement illustrated includes means for processing the staple fibers to disperse them in discrete form and to continuously deliver the staple fibers into the open pattern of the filaments of the strands at the region 29 adjacent the deflecting surface 28 for commingling, combining or blending the staple fiber with the continuous filaments.

The apparatus includes a generally circular cylindrically-shaped housing '70 providing a chamber 71 having closed ends, the latter having been omitted from FIG- URE 1 for purposes of illustration. A channel, chute or passage 72 is in communication with the fiber feeding chamber 56 and is in communication with the fiber conditioning chamber 71 in a generally tangential position for conveying staple fiber from the feed chamber 56 into the cylindrical chamber 71.

The channel 72 above the region of delivery of staple fiber from the feeding means is open to the atmosphere as shown at 74 to admit atmospheric air with the staple fiber moving through the passage 72. The feed chute or passage 72 conveys the staple fiber into the chamber 71 at a controlled rate. The lower wall region of the housing 70 is formed with a plurality of openings 76 through which fibers are delivered into the region 29 of the open strand forwardly of the zone of impingement of the strand 20 against the deflector surface 27 of the plate 28.

The openings 76 may be in the form of slots arranged in spaced apart relation or in the form of discrete openings simulating a screen or a foraminous area. The openings 76 may be formed in a separable plate in lieu of the wall region of the housing 70 to facilitate changing plates to provide different patterns of orifices or openings for most etficient delivery of the discrete staple fibers dependent upon the types or lengths of fibers to be blended or commingled with the filaments of the opened strand.

In the arrangement illustrated in FIGURE 1, it is desirable to establish turbulent movement of the staple fiber in the conditioning chamber 71 in order to break up clumps or tufts of fibers so that substantially discrete fibers are projected through the openings 76. The discrete fibers in the chamber 71 are entrained in a tangential air stream arranged so that the fibers in the air stream are properly directed through the openings 76 for blending with the pattern of open filaments.

The housing 70 is equipped with an air nozzle 80 tangentially arranged with respect to the circular wall of the chamber, the direction of the air stream projected from p the nozzle 80 is in general alignment with the openings 76. In order to set up effective turbulence in the charm ber 71 to separate pellets, clumps or tufts of fibers into dispersed discrete fibers, it is desirable to introduce one or more air blasts or jets in generally radial directions in the chamber 71 to accomplish this purpose.

As shown in FIGURE 1, a nozzle 82 is disposed to direct an air stream generally radially into the chamber 71 to establish turbulence of the staple fiber in the chamber. Several of such nozzles may be spaced peripherally of the housing for directing air streams radially into the chamber. The nozzles and 82 are connected with a suitable source of compressed air. The deflector plate 28 is supported by trough-like member 84, the side walls 85 thereof extending upwardly so as to confine the staple fiber and dispersed filaments in a blending zone.

The blended or composite assemblage 32 of filaments of the strand 20 and staple fiber 54 is advanced into the compactor 30 by the winding of the composite linear body of filaments and staple fiber 32 onto the sleeve or tube 34. The air jet introduced into the compactor 30 through the tube 48 and the funnel or converging configuration of the compactor 39 function to progressively fold in and integrate the staple fibers delivered into the zone 29 with the filaments of the strand 20 to form the composite linear body 32.

The staple fiber 54 is of a different material than that of the attenuated fibers or filaments 18 to impart to the composite linear body 32 the advantageous characteristics of difierent materials. For example, a linear body 32 resembling a bulk yarn may be formed by proportioning the amount of staple fiber integrated with the continuous filaments or fibers.

A comparatively small amount of staple fiber may be blended with the fibers or filaments 18 to merely provide a roughened surface for the body 32 where a roughened surface is desired in the fabrication of textiles. The use of the method and apparatus of the invention enables the production of a composite filamentary body having the desirable strength characteristics of continuous filaments and a surface motif simulating that of staple yarn.

In the operation of the arrangement shown in FIGURE 1, streams 16 of heat-softened material such as glass flowing from orificed projections 14 of the feeder are attenuated into continuous filaments 18 by rotation of the pull wheels or rotatable members 24, and the filaments 18 gathered or converged by a guide 22 into a strand 20. The filaments may be attenuated at linear speeds of several thousand feet per minute.

The strand of filaments from the pull wheels 24 is projected or impinged against the angularly disposed deflecting plate 28, the force of impingement deflecting the filaments away from the surface 27 of the plate, simultaneously dispersing or opening up the filaments of the strand into an open pattern or network. Concomitantly with the formation of the filaments of the strand, the fiber feeding member 58 is rotated by the motor 64 to feed staple fiber of different material through the chute or passage into the chamber 71.

Compressed air is ejected into the chamber 71 through the nozzles 36 and 82, the staple fiber being tumbled and agitated by the radially directed air blast from the nozzle 82 to separate pellets, tufts or clumps of fibers preparatory to their being entrained in an air blast or stream from the nozzle 80 and projected through the orifices 76 into contact with the dispersed or separated filaments in open pattern formation at the region 29 adjacent the deflector surface 27. The filaments and staple fiber are drawn through the compactor 30 by winding the linear body 32 formed therefrom into a cylindrical package 36 on the rotating sleeve 34.

The driving means 44 for the material collecting tube or sleeve 34 rotates the tube at a speed to accommodate the linear material 32 at substantially the same linear speed as the attenuation of the filaments 18 under the influence of the pull rolls 24. The rate of feed or delivery of the staple fiber into the open network or pattern of filaments may be regulated by varying the speed of the staple fiber feeding means.

FIGURE 2 illustrates an apparatus for blending together or combining a linear fibrous body with a strand of newly formed filaments of a material other than that of the fibrous body to form a composite linear body. In this form, heat-softened glass or resin contained in a receptacle or feeder 1t), flows through orificed tips 14' as streams 16 which are attenuated to filaments 18' under the influence of rotatable members or pull rolls 24', the filaments being converged by a guide eye or gathering means 22 into strand formation 20 prior to engagement of the strand by the rotatable members 24' at the nip region thereof.

The filaments are attenuated at comparataively high speeds of several thousand linear feet per minute. The advancing strand 2ft is continuously impinged against a deflector plate or surface 28' supported by a trough-like member 84. Concomitantly with the formation of the filaments, a filamentary or fibrous yarn or linear body 90 is advanced from a package or supply 92 thereof into the open pattern or opened region of the strand of filaments 6 at the region 29' resulting from impingement of the strand against the deflector plate. The material 92 is preferably in package formation carried by a spool 93 supported by suitable means (not shown).

The arrangement of FIGURE 2 includes a means 96 for advancing the linear body or yarn from the package 92. In the embodiment illustrated, the advancing means is in the form of a tubular member 98 having a side branch tube or passage 101) through which compressed air is introduced into contact with the yarn or body at a proper angle to advance the body 90 through the tube 93.

The arrangement illustrated at 96 is referred to as an air lance and is of conventional construction, and the rate of feed of the material may be controlled by regulating velocity of air delivered through the tube 98.

The linear body or yarn 90 is blended and combined with the spaced filaments at the region 29' and the assemblage of strand 20 of filaments and linear body or yarn 9b advanced through a compactor 31) which is of the type illustrated in FIGURE 1 wherein compressed air is introduced into a side branch tube 48, the air assisting in compacting the materials into a composite linear body 192;. The linear body 102 passes through a traverse member 46' and is wound upon a tubular sleeve or tube 1114- to form a wound package 106. The sleeve and package are rotated by a driving means 44' contained within a housing 42.

Through the arrangement shown in FIGURE 2, the yarn or linear body 91) formed of fibers of materials other than the material of the filaments or fibers 18' are blended together at the region 29' of opening of the strand 26) to form a composite linear body of fibrous or filamentary materials wherein the composite body is endowed with the individual or particular characteristics of the fibers and filaments making up the composite body.

The arrangement illustrated in FIGURE 3 is especially adapted for combining a strand of continuous filaments formed of heat-softenable material, such as glass, with a fibrous linear body, the latter providing a core for the filaments.

The heat-softened material in the feeder or supply receptacle 10" flows through orificed tips 14 forming streams 16" which are attenuated to filaments 18". As in the other forms of apparatus, the filaments are converged into a strand 20" by a gathering means 22" and are engaged by rotatable members 24" at the nip region, the members rotating at a speed to attenuate the streams to fine filaments.

The strand 21)" is impinged upon a deflecting surface of plate 28" to open up, separate and disperse the filaments of the strand in an open pattern at the region 29". The plate 28" is supported by a trough-like member 84". In this form, the plate 28" is provided with an opening through which is advanced a fibrous or filamentary body or yarn 112 from a supply roll 114 carried by a suitable support (not shown). The yarn or linear body 112 moves through the nip region between a pair of rolls 116 which operate as friction or drag means upon the body 112 to maintain the same in tension as the body moves through the opening 110 in the plate 28".

The filaments of the strand 2%" are separated or opened up by the force of impinging the strand against the deflector plate 28". The linear body or yarn 112, formed of fibers of different material than the material of the filaments 1%", is advanced through the opening 110 in the plate 28" into contact with the dispersed filaments at the region 29".

The filaments 211" and the yarn or linear body 112 are advanced through the compactor 31) to form a composite linear body 118 which is wound upon a tube 120 into a package 122 as in the other forms of apparatus hereinbefore described. The linear body or yarn 112 may be formed of continuous filaments or staple fiber.

FIGURE 4 is a semidiagramrnatic view of an appasurges? ratus for combining or blending newly attenuated fibers with fibrous or filamentary material in linear body or yarn formation. The arrangement shown in FIGURE 4 is especially adapted for forming fibers of heat-softenable low melting point organic materials, such as acrylic resin, polyamide resin, polyethylene resin, polyester resin or other fiber-forming materials.

A supply of heat-softened resin or other fiber-forming material is contained in the receptacle 130 from which streams 132 of the softened material flow on to the peripheries of rotatable members, rolls or drums 136 mounted upon shafts 133 and driven in opposite directions as indicated by the arrows by a suitable motor and transmission gearing (not shown).

In this form of the invention, a yarn or linear body 138 formed of glass fibers or filaments or other fibers is advanced through the nip region of the rotatable members or drums 136. A supply spool 146 of the yarn or linear material is maintained in a position whereby the material or yarn 138 may be withdrawn and passed around a guide 142 and downwardly between the rotating drums 136.

The streams 132 of the heat-softened material provide films 144 of the material upon adjacent peripheral sector regions or areas of the drums 136 for conveying the heat-softened material through the nip region of the drums and in contact with the yarn or linear body 138. The heat-softened fiber-forming material of the film 144 tends to adhere to the peripheral surfaces of the drums as the drum surfaces move in divergent directions below the nip region thereof.

The adhesion of the fiber-forming material to the drum surfaces results in drawing or attenuating the material into fibers as the viscosity of the material effects a separation of portions of the film into discrete bodies 148, the end regions of which remain adhered to the drums. As the surfaces of the drums diverge during rotation the discrete bodies 148 are attenuated into fibers 150 which adhere to the yarn or linear body 138 and move downwardly with the yarn.

When the attenuated fibers or filaments 150 become fine through attenuation, the ends of the fibers or filaments in contact with the peripheries of the drums are pulled therefrom and the fibers or filaments carried along or advanced with the yarn 138. The assemblage of yarn and fibers move into and through a compactor 39a whereby the fibers are compacted along the surface of the yarn or linear body 138 to form a composite linear body or structure 152.

The composite linear body is wound upon a sleeve or tube 154 rotated by suitable means into a package in the same manner as described in reference to the other forms of apparatus. The heat-softened material 132, being a comparatively low melting resin, is maintained in a viscous condition by the application of heat to the peripheral surface areas of the rotatable members or drums 136.

As illustrated in FIGURE 4, banks of infra-red lamps 158 may be employed to heat the surfaces of the drums 136. It is to be understood that hot blasts from internal combustion burners or flames from burning gases may be directed into contact with the surfaces of the drums 136 to maintain the proper viscosity of the fiber-forming material for most efiicient attenuation.

Through the arrangement shown in FIGURE 4, a bulky yarn may be fashioned by adhering newly formed fibers or filaments to a preformed yarn or linear body also formed of fibers. The linear body or yarn 138 may be formed of fibers of glass, linear polyamide material or other materials such as acrylic, polyethylene and polyester resins or the like. In lieu of the advancing of the yarn or linear body 138 by winding the final product upon a rotatable sleeve 154, a pair of pull rolls such as illustrated in the other forms may be utilized for advancing the yarn 138 and fibers adhered thereto.

By advancing the yarn 138 by means of pull rolls at a linear speed slightly greater than the peripheral speed of the drums or rotatable members 136, a secondary attenuation of the fibers adhering to the yarn 138 may be attained. The packaged material made by this method may be processed by twisting same with other fibrous or filamentary bodies for various textile uses.

In the forms of apparatus shown in FIGURES 1 through 3, the heat softened material is preferably a mineral material such as glass and the continuous filamerits provide a strand endowed with high strength characteristics. The staple fiber oriented with the continuous filaments may be natural fibers such as cotton, wool or resin fibers such as fibers formed of linear polyamides, polyesters, polyethylene, acrylics or the like. In the arrangement illustrated in FIGURE 4, fibers of the yarn or linear body 133 should preferably be formed of materials of a fusing temperature higher than that of the material from which the fibers or filaments are formed in order to avoid a fusion of the fibers or filaments of the yarn 138 with the other fibers.

It is apparent that, within the scope of the invention, modifications and different arrangements may be made other than as herein disclosed, and the present disclosure is illustrative merely, the invention comprehending all variations thereof.

We claim:

1. The method of producing a composite linear body of different materials including attenuating heat-softened material to comparatively fine elongate discrete bodies in strand form, impinging the strand against a surface to disperse the bodies, continuously blending a fibrous constituent with the dispersed discrete bodies as they are formed to establish a linear assemblage, advancing the linear assemblage through a compactor to compact the discrete bodies and fibrous constituent into a composite linear body, and winding the composite body on a collector.

2. The method of producing a linear composite fibrous body including advancing a linear multifilament component, impinging the multifilament component against a surface to disperse the filaments of the component, blending staple fiber with the dispersed filaments of the advancing filamentary component, and continuously advancing the asseemblage of staple fiber and multifilament component through a compactor to form a compacted linear body.

3. The method of producing a composite linear body including continuously impinging a linear group of filaments against a surface to open the filaments, blending staple fiber with the open filaments, continuously advancing the assemblage of staple fiber and open filaments through a compactor to form a compacted composite linear body, and collecting the compacted body.

4. The method of producing a linear composite fibrous body including continuously impinging a linear filamentary component of filaments against a surface to open the filaments, blending staple fiber of different material with the opened filaments of the filamentary component, directing the assemblage of staple fiber and opened filaments through a compactor to form a compacted linear body, and winding the compacted body into a package.

5. The method of producing a composite linear body including continuously attenuating heat-softened material to fine elongate discrete bodies, converging the bodies into a strand, impinging the strand against a surface to disperse the bodies without fracturing them, continuously blending fibrous material with the dispersed discrete bodies, directing the blend of fine dispersed discrete bodies and fibrous material through a compactor to integrate the discrete bodies and fibrous material into a composite linear body, and collecting the composite linear body in a package.

6. A method of forming a linear composite product including attenuating heat-softened material to continuous filaments, continuously gathering the filaments into a linear bundle, impinging the linear bundle of filaments against a surface to disperse the filaments into an open pattern, feeding a fibrous constituent of a different material into the open pattern of filaments to commingle the materials, and compacting the commingled materials into a linear composite product.

7. A method of forming a linear composite product including attenuating heat-softened material to continuous filaments, continuously gathering the filaments into a linear bundle, impinging the bundle against a surface to disperse the filaments into an open pattern, feeding staple fiber of a different material into the open pattern of filaments to commingle the materials, compacting the commingled materials into a linear composite product, and Winding the product into a package.

8. A method of forming a linear filamentary product including attenuating heat-softened mineral material to continuous filaments, continuously gathering the filaments into a linear bundle, impinging the bundle against a surface to disperse the filaments into an open pattern, feeding organic fibrous material into the open pattern of mineral filaments to commingle the fibrous material and filaments, compacting the commingled filaments and fibrous material into a linear product, and Winding the linear product into a package.

9. A method of producing a composite linear structure including impinging a strand of continuous filaments against a surface to disperse the filaments of the strand, delivering fiber of a different material into the region of the dispersed filaments, commingling the fiber with the 10 dispersed filaments, compacting the commingled fiber and dispersed filaments While advancing the filaments, and Winding the compacted commingled fiber and filaments into a package.

10. The method of producing a linear composite fibrous product including advancing a linear multifilament component, impinging the multifilament component against a surface to disperse the filaments of the component, com mingling a fibrous constituent with the dispersed filamerits, and compacting the commingled filaments and fibrous constituent into a linear composite product.

11. A method of producing a composite linear structure including impinging a strand of continuous filaments against a surface to disperse the filaments of the strand, delivering fiber of a dilferent material into the region of the dispersed filaments, commingling the fiber With the dis persed filaments, and compacting the commingled fiber and dispersed filaments into a linear composite product while advancing the filaments and fiber.

References (Iited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,622,306 Anderson Dec. 23, 1952 2,719,352 Slayter et al. Oct. 4, 1955 2,816,327 Hunter et al Dec. 17, 1957 2,825,199 Hicks Mar. 4, 1958 2,842,803 Hunter et al. July 15, 1958 2,842,804 Hunter et al July 15, 1958 2,851,737 Hunter et al. Sept. 16, 1958 2,869,967 Breen Jan. 20, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3262181 *Nov 22, 1963Jul 26, 1966Eastman Kodak CoMethod for opening fibrous tow
US3309752 *Mar 28, 1966Mar 21, 1967Nuval CoApparatus for producing slub yarn
US3310933 *Jun 18, 1965Mar 28, 1967Burlington Industries IncMethod and apparatus for making a decorative yarn with slubs therein
US3430314 *Sep 29, 1965Mar 4, 1969Courtaulds LtdMethod of bulking textile yarns
US4345927 *Dec 31, 1980Aug 24, 1982Ppg Industries, Inc.Apparatus and process for use preparing a continuous strand mat
US5147721 *Jul 7, 1989Sep 15, 1992Hexcel CorporationCeramic reinforced glass matrix
US5891284 *Sep 22, 1997Apr 6, 1999Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Manufacture of a undirectional composite fabric
US7228604 *Apr 28, 2006Jun 12, 2007American Linc CorporationSystem, apparatus, and method of reducing production loss having compressor
US20060191117 *Apr 28, 2006Aug 31, 2006American Linc CorporationSystem, apparatus, and method of reducing production loss having compressor
Classifications
U.S. Classification19/145.5, 28/258, 57/244, 57/224, 57/249
International ClassificationD01D5/08
Cooperative ClassificationD02G3/402, D01D5/082
European ClassificationD01D5/08B, D02G3/40B