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Publication numberUS314480 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 24, 1885
Publication numberUS 314480 A, US 314480A, US-A-314480, US314480 A, US314480A
InventorsAnd Feiedbich Peophet
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
rosenkranz
US 314480 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

No Model.) 2 Sheets-Sheet 1. P. H. ROSENKRANZ 85 F. PROPHET. WATER METER. No. 314,480. Patented Mar. 24, 1885.

(No Model.) ZShQetS-Sheen P. H. ROSENKRANZ 88 F. PROPHET.

- WATEE METER.

810.814,480. Patented M44. 24, 1888.

f ffl/f En (Y 4 i Il', 5 VIII/l1 V s@ 6 UNITED STATES.v

vaTENT Vtrice.

PHILIPP HERMANN ROSENKRANZ AND FRIEDRICH PROFI-IRT, OF HANOVER, PRUSSIA, GERMANY, ASSIGNORS TO DREYER, ROSENKRANZ di DROOP, OF

saMF. PLACE.

WATER-METER.

LJECIFECATEON forming part of Letters Patent No. 31%,80, dated March 24:, 1885.

Application tiled October 3, 18M.

(Nomode.) Patented in Germany May 2", 18r0, No.12,358, and July 15,1881, No.1F1,97 in England December H, isti), No. 5.116. ai d in A ustria-Hungary January T, 1881, No. 36,952 and No. 40,703.

To @ZZ whom z5 may concern/.-

Be it known that wc, PHTLIPP HERMANN RosENKRANz, a subject ofthe King of Prussia, residing at Hanover. Prussia, German E1n-j 5 pire, and FRIEDRICH PROPHET, a subject of the King ot' Prussia, residing at Hanover,

Prussia, German Empire, have invented certain new and useful Improvcmentsin the Oonr struction otl Water-Meters; and we do hereby` The invention consists, essentially, in thev construction and arrangement 'of the meter, substantially as hereinafter fully described, and as specih'cally set forth in the claims herel to annexed. y i

ln the accompanying drawings, Figure lis a vertical lftransversc section of a meterconstructcd according to our invention. Fig. 2 is ahorizontal section of the meter-casing, the 3o measuring-wheel being shown in plan. Fig. 3 is a vertical transverse section ofthe measuring-chamber, showing a modiiied form of measuring-wheel. Fig. 4 is a horizontal section thereof. Figs. lSand 6 are plan views of modifications in the construction ofthe measuringwheel.` Figs. 7 and 8 show by an elevation and a transverse sectional view, respectively, still further modifications in the construction of the wheel and the inclosing-casing thereof.

` 4o Figs. 9, 11, and 12 are vertical sections of the wheel-casing and wheel; Figs. 10, 13, and16, horizontal sections, and Figs. 14 and 15 plan views,of further modifications of the measuring-wheel and casing. Fig. 17 is a plan view of one of the transmitting-disks of the registering mechanism. Figs. 18 and 19 are a section and an elevation of the key for locking and unlocking the meter-case.

Like letters of reference indicate like part-s wherever such may occur in the above figures 5o of drawings.

The meter, Figs. 1 and 2, is practically composed of two cylindrical casings, O and C', each provided with iianges or a plate, C4, (shown in dotted lines, Fig. 2,) by means of which said casings are bolted or screwed together. The casing C is divided into two chambers, c c', by a strong partition, c2. The chamber c contains the registering mechanism, which may be of any well-known construction 6o and arrangement, and need not here be particularl y described. The chamber c contains the transmitting mechanism, hereinafter referred to, for transmitting the movements of the measuring-wheel to the registering mech- 6 5 anism. The wheel-casing C is provided with :an inlet branch, B, which may be on a planc coinciding with orinclined to the plane ot' rotation of the measuring-wheel, andan out- `let branch, B', diametrically opposite thereto 7o on a plane coinciding with that of the rotation ,of the wheel.

XVe have fouudthat in all fluid-meters the corroding or oxidizing action upon the inlettuted, or by constructing said nozzle ot' amaterial indifferent to the corrosive or oxidizing action of the liquid to be measured.

In order to avoid the necessity of unconpling the meter from the linepipes,or of taking the casing apart, we prefer to construct both the wheel and the inlet-nozzle of a material indifferent to the corrosive or oxidizing action of the liquid to be measured, such substances depending largely upon the nature of said liquid. It is further necessary to the good op- Y eration of a liquid-meter that its flow through the measuring-chamber should be retarded as little as possible, and this can be best effected by employing a measuring-wheel of or as near as possible of the same specific gravityas that of the liquid. This may be attained by various means or combination of means. For instance, the measuring-wheel may be constructed of a substance of approximately the same specic gravity as that of the liquid to be measured, such as hard rubber o r vulcanite for water-meters, said hard rubber or vulcanite being nearly of the same speciiic gravity as that of water, and is indifferent to its oxidizing action. It may also beemployed for other liquids that do not inju-riously affect it, and if their relative specific gravities differ materially, or if the nature of the liquid does not admit of the use ofit, and it is required to employ in the construction of the wheel a substance of greater or less specific gravity than that of said liquid, saidwheel may be so'coni structed that the action of the liquid on its passage over the wheel will either load the same if the specic gravity isgreater, or lighten or balance the wheel if its specific gravity is less, than that-of the liquid. This action of the liquid may be increased or diminished by giving the inlet-passage agreater or less angle to the plane of rotation of the wheel. These constructions of the measu ring-wheel will be more fully described hereinafter, and the various substances of which such wheels are to be constructed will readily suggest themselves to the manufacturer, according tothe nature of the liquid to be measured bythe meter, which we will describe as constructedv for .use as a watermeter having its inlet-passage on a plane inclined to the plane of, rotation of the measur 'ing-wheel.

O is the nozzle above referred to, made of vulcanite orhard rubber, and having a passage, o, of the required interior area. It is slightly tapering, and fits snugly into the tapering passage b of the inlet branch B. It may be cemented into the inlet branch, though we prefer to fit the same` into the said branch, so as to form tight joints and yet admit of ready removal. We thus provide an inlet-passage that will renain unchanged in its superficial area and that will offer azminimum frictional resistance to the passage of the water.

The casing C has a central annular chamber, G2, into which the branches B B open. The chamber C2 is formed -bygsaid casing and a disk, D, that has a central opening, p, through which projects the hub or body wof the measuring-wheel W, located in said chamber C.

The said casing C has in its upper face two annular offsets, c3 c4. On the former is seated the disk D, and on the latter the casing C, said disk D having itself an offset, d, the upper face of which is ilush with that of the offset c4, the wall of the casing C beingpartly seated upon the disk and partly on fthe offset ct, as

shown.

To prevent leakage at the point of connection of the casings C C and disk D, we interpose a packing-ring, r, of any suitable mate- 7o wheel or its wings and the said walls and bot` tom of the chamber. The casing C has a central boss, c, on its under side, provided with a screw-threaded axial aperture, into which the spindle is screwed and held against rotation by suitable check-nuts. Around the boss c5 is formed an annular flange, O3, into which is screwed a footpiece, F, that supports the meter and at the same time protects the spindie-head. The rotation of the wheel W is communicated to the registering mechanism in any desired or usual manner-as, for instance, by means of a suitable transmitting mechanism located in the chamber c of casing C. This chamber c is formed by the partition c2k and a disk, D',y secured to an offset, o', in the Wall of the casing by means of a ring, R, sprung into an annular` groove formed below said offset.

A is the transmitting-shaft, that has its bearings in the disk D and in a plate, d', secured by screws to posts d. The shaft A projects below the disk D', and carries a crankarm, a, that takes into an opening or a slot formed in the upper face of the hub or body `w of the measuring-wheel W, by means of which the rotation of the wheel is transmitted to said shaft.

The chamber c,containing the transmitting mechanism, need not be fluid-tight, and to avoid too speedy wear of said mechanism we make the same of vulcanite or other-analogous substance not readily corroded or oxidized by the liquid to be measured. The movement ot' the transmitting-gearing is transmitted to the registering mechanism by a disk, E, that has an eccentric stud, pin, or lug, e, that projects into a slot, f, Fig. 17, formed in a disk, E', secured to thelower end ofa second shaft, Af. The latter shaft carries at its upper end acrank-arm, a, that projects into a slot in a. disk, E2, similar to `disk E', Fig. 17, secured to the lower end of the driving-shaft of the registering mechanism, located in'chamber c ofthe casing C, and supported therein from an offset, o?, and held in position by a ring, R, sprung into a groove formed in the wall of casing C. The shaft A has its bearings in the partition c?,the liquid beingr prevented from entering'chamber c through the shaft-bearing by a suitable packing, p.

Above the dial and pointers of the registering mechanism is arranged a glass face, G,

IIO

held against an annular shoulder or offset, o3, in the walls of a ring, N, by means of a ring, R2, sprung into a suitable groove formed in theinner periphery of said ring N below the offset. The ring N is detachably connected to the upper end of casing C, and is locked thereto in any suitable manner.

To prevent the ready and unauthorized re` moval of the ring N, it is provided with ahollow boss, a', that has a screw-threaded perforation for the passage of a screw, M, the point of which takes into a groove formed in the outer periphery of said ring to lock the same to casingG.4 The head of the screw M is prismshaped, and is operated by a key, K, Figs. 18

and 19, the barrel of which is cf such interior configuration as to fit the head of the screw M. To avoid the accidental breakage of the glass face G, the ring N has hinged to it at Za lid or cap, L, of sheet metal, from which projects a thumb-piece, Z.

It Will be observed that the meter-casing is so constructed that access may be had to any part thereof without disconnecting it from the line-pipes. For instance, ifaccess is to be had to the registering mechanism, the removal of .the ring N, the expansion-ring R', and the pointer or pointers from the main shaft of the registering mechanism will be sufficient, as such'rnechanisin may then belifted out of the casing C. If,on the other hand,access is to be had to the transmitting mechanism, the unscrewing of the bolts of the flanges G1, that connect the casings GGQwill be sufficient. The casing C cau then be lifted off the casing G', the ring R removed,and the transmitting devices taken out; or the disk D can be removed and the measuring-Wheel W lifted out of the chamber C2. By unscrewing the foot F the spindle that supports the measuring-wheel may be removed. It will further be observed that the wheel W is suspended upon a conical spindle. The friction of said wheel on its support is therefore reduced to a minimum.

`thefvvheel will tend to lift and balance the same in case the specific gravity thereof is greater than that ofthe liquid.

To increase the action of the liquid on the wheel, an annular recess, to2, Figs. 4 and 5, may

' be formed in the hub or body w thereof, as

shown in Figs. 3 and 4, or the wheel may be formed of two sets of wings, W W2, one set intersecting or projecting over the space between the wings of the other set, as in Fig. 5,

By giving an inclination to said wings may be formed on curvilinear planes, as in Fig. 6, or the wings may be formed on planes inclined both to the plane of rotation and that of the axis of the Wheel,

fas in Figs. 7 and 8. In the latter construction ofthe wings, and in the combination therewith of an inclined inlet-passage, it will be readily understood that-when the vertical inclination of the wings is such that the liquid will act upon them from their upper edges downward said wheel will be forced down or loaded, and if this inclination is reversed the action of the liquid will tend to lift or balance the wheel, thus affording a convenient means for adjusting the specific gravity of the wheel relatively to that of the liquid to be measured.

To decrease the speciiic gravity of the wings V, or XV W2, they may be provided with recesses w3, into which fits an annular flange, c6. formedonand projecting from the bottom of casing C or from the bottom of disk D, or from both, as shown in Figs. 9, 10, 11, and 12, respectively. The wings may also be formed in the shape of buckets, as in Figs. 13 and 14. Nor is it absolutely necessary that the wheel W and its wings VT or W W2 should occupy the full depth of chamber C2, as said wheel` and wings may be of any desired height relatively to the depth of chamber CZ, either the full height, as at I-I, or onehalf, as at H, Fig. 7 or any other fraction of said height. It will also be understood that more than one inlet branch B may be employed upon the periphery of the wheel-casing C', and that instead of a wheel having six wings a wheel having more or less wings may be employed.

We have hereinabove described the apparatus as being in general of a cylindrical form. W'ith the exception of the chamber C2, this is, however, not necessary, as said apparatus may have any other interior or exterior form in cross-section, as will be readily understood.

Having now described our invention, what we claim as new is 1. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as described, of the meter-casing having a cylindrical measuring-chamber, an outlet-passage, and a tapering inlet-passage communicating With said chamber, With a measuring-wheel and an inlet-nozzle made of a taper corresponding'with that of the inletpassage in which said nozzle is loosely seated, for the purpose specified.

2. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as described, of the meter-casing having a vcylindrical measuring-chamber, an outlet-passage, and a tapering inlet-passage in communication with said chamber, with a measuring-wheel having peripheral Wings or buckets, and an inlet-nozzle having a taper corresponding .with that of the inlet-passage IOO IIO

in which the nozzle is loosely seated, said nozzle being arranged to direct the intlowing liquid in the line of a tangent to the wheel, for the purposes specified.

3. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as described, with the meter-casing having a cylindrical measuring-chamber, an outlet-passage, and a tapering inlet-passage in the line of a 'tangent to the chamber and communicating therewith, with a measuringwheel of or about of the same specific gravity as that ofthe liquid to be measured, and an inlet-nozzle of a taper corresponding to that of the inlet-passage in which the nozzle is loosely seated, said nozzle being made of a material indifferent to the chemical or corrosive action of the liquid to be measured,l for the purpose specified.

4. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as described, with the metercasing having cylindrical measuringchamber, an outlet-passage, and atapering inlet-passage on the line ofa tangent to the chamber, with a measuring-wheel of or practically of the same specific gravity as that of' the liquid to berneasured, and constructed of a material indifferent to the chemical action of said liquid, and an inlet-nozzle of a taper corresponding with that of the inlet-passage in which the 'nozzle is seated, said nozzle being constructed of a material indifferent to the chemical action ofthe liquid to bc measured7 for the purposes specified.

5. A. measuring-wheel for liquid-meters, having two sets of superposed wings projecting from a common hub in like plane, one set intersecting the space between the wings of the other set, for the purposes specifled.

6. A measuring-wheel for liquidmeters, having two sets of superposed wings projecting in like planes and on lines inclined or tangential to and from a common hub, one set of wings intersecting the space between the Wings ofthe other set, for the purposes speciied.

7. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as described, of the meter-casing having a cylindrical measuring-chamber, an outlet-passage, and an inlet-passage on the liuc of a tangent to said chamber,with a measuring-wheel provided with two sets of superposed wings projecting on lines inclined or tangential to and from a common hub, one set of wings intersecting the space between those of the other set, for the purposes specified.

8. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as herein described, of a measuring- Wheel the wings whereof are provided with recesses w3, with a measuringchamber in which are formed annular anges c6, projecting into said recesses,for the purpose specified.

9. In a liquid-meter, the combination, substantially as herein described, ofa measuringwheel having a central annular recess for a spindle, and an lannular recess, wz, in its hub or body, with a measuringchamber and an inlet-passage therefor, for the purpose specied.

l0. The combination, substantially as hercin described, of the casingC, having partition c9A and offsets o o2, the disk D', and the sup-- porting-plates for the registering-gearing of the expansion-rings R R', for the purpose specied.

l1. The combination, substantially as herein described, with the casing C, of the ring N,

and foot-piece F, for the purpose specified.

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures in presence ot' two witnesses.

PHILIPP HERMANN ROSENKRANZ. FRIEDRICH PltOPHET.

W'itnesses:

WILLIAM C. FOX, Jos. KRACKE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3187571 *Aug 21, 1961Jun 8, 1965Jules Borel & CoFlow measuring apparatus
US3792610 *Oct 4, 1971Feb 19, 1974Bpn Ass IncFlow meter
US4182175 *Dec 27, 1977Jan 8, 1980Boehringer John RSpirometer
US4271014 *May 7, 1979Jun 2, 1981Extracorporeal Medical Specialties, Inc.Dialysis apparatus and technique
US4548084 *Feb 15, 1983Oct 22, 1985Kimmon Manufacturing Co., Inc.Flow meter
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationG01F1/07