Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3144966 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 18, 1964
Filing dateApr 16, 1962
Priority dateApr 16, 1962
Publication numberUS 3144966 A, US 3144966A, US-A-3144966, US3144966 A, US3144966A
InventorsRalph J Cook
Original AssigneeSemco Res Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cartridge for mixing and dispensing sealant compound
US 3144966 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 18, 1964 coo 3,144,966

CARTRIDGE FOR MIXING AND DISPENSING SEALANT COMPOUND Filed April 16, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Aug. 18, 1964 R. J. COOK 3,144,966

CARTRIDGE FOR MI XING AND DISPENSING SEALANT COMPOUND Filed April 16, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 id' arxzega;

Aug. 18, 1964 R. J. cooK 3,144,966

CARTRIDGE FOR MIXING AND DISPENSING SEALANT COMPOUND Filed April 16, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Z l f I I l l j United States Patent C) 3,144,966 CARTRIDGE FUR MEXTNG AND DESPENSHNG SEALANT CU MlPUUNl) Ralph J. Cook, Inglewood, (Ialih, assignor to Semen Research lno, lnglewood, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Apr. 16, 1962, Ser. No. 137,610 20 Claims. (Cl. 222-l3 This invention relates to a cartridge for dispensing a material, the ingredients of which must be mixed fresh at the time of use. This application is a continuation-inpart of my copending application Serial No. 87,442, filed February 6, 1961, and now abandoned, which, in turn, is a continuation-in-part of my copending application Serial No. 828,119, filed July 20, 1959.

The invention is particularly applicable to a. cartridge for dispensing a sealant compound that is commonly used in aircraft and building construction. Such a sealant comprises a base material and a catalyst and, once these ingredients are mixed together, the sealant must be applied promptly before it hardens to such degree as to become unusable.

The materials of the sealant are commonly mixed at the point of use by some type of mixer, for example, by the apparatus disclosed in the Trumbull et al. Patent No. 2,859,017. The mixed compound is then discharged from the mixing apparatus into suitable cartridges. Each cartridge typically comprises a cylindrical container with a dispensing outlet at one end and a movable piston-like wall at the other end. A cartridge filled with the mixed sealant is placed in a suitable dispensing gun for the actual dispensing operation. An air-powered dispensing gun suitable for this purpose is described in the Detrie et al. Patent No. 2,838,210.

The purpose of the present invention is to meet those situations where a mixing apparatus such as an apparatus of the Trumbull patent is not available, or where there is no need for mixing a sizable batch of the sealant. For this purpose, the invention provides a disposable multiple purpose cartridge. Initially the cartridge serves as a dual compartment container in which the two ingredients of the sealant compound are stored separately in complete isolation from each other. When the time arrives for actually using the sealant, the cartridge functions as a manually operable means for mixing the two ingredients. After the two ingredients are thoroughly mixed, the cartridge is placed in an air-powered dispensing gun for the actual dispensing operation.

The cartridge includes a cylindrical shell that is open at one end and is formed with a dispensing outlet at the other end. The open end of the shell is initially closed by a piston-like wall member which is adapted for actuation by the air-powered dispensing gun for which the cartridge is designed.

The particular problem to which the invention is specifically directed is to provide for storing a major quantity of a base compound in the cartridge together with a minor quantity of a catalyst. It is contemplated that the cartridge will initially keep the two ingredients completely isolated from each other but nevertheless will be adapted for elfecting complete intermixture of the two ingredients when the time arrives for actually using the sealant.

The problem is complicated by the fact that the two ingredients must not only be isolated from each other but must also be isolated from the atmosphere and must be mixed in the cartridge in a manner that does not permit the introduction of air bubbles into the mixture. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the volume of the catalyst is only an exceedingly small fraction of the volume of the base compound with which it is to be mixed.

3,144,965 Patented Aug. 18, 1964 The invention meets this need by mounting a dasher slidingly inside the shell for longitudinal reciprocation to mix the two ingredients and by providing a hollow rod for operating the dasher. The relatively large volume of the base compound is stored in the cartridge shell, the shell being closed at one end by a piston-like end wall and being closed at the other end by the tubular operating rod fitting snugly in the dispensing outlet. The small volume of the catalyst is stored inside the tubular operating rod, the inner end of the tubular operating rod being initially closed by suitable means and the outer end being closed by a piston.

It is contemplated that the closure means employed for initially closing the inner end of the tubular operating rod will be operable by manually exerted force to open and thus place the stored catalyst in communication with the base compound. The closure means may, for example, be a fluid-pressure-responsive valve or a stopper member that may be displaced to open position by fluid pressure created inside the tubular operating rod. Or, if desired, the closure means may be a frangible diaphragm and the piston-like end wall of the shell may be provided with means to rupture the diaphragm. When the time arrives for intermixing the two ingredients, the inner end of the tubular operating rod is opened to release the stored catalyst. Thus, if the closure for the inner end of the tubular operating rod is a pressure-responsive valve, a suitable implement is inserted into the outer end of the tubular operating rod to ram the piston towards the inner end of the operating rod. This action first places the catalyst in the tubular operating rod under pressure with consequent opening of the pressure-responsive valve at the inner end of the tubular operating rod and then the moving piston extrudes the catalyst into the base compound in the cartridge shell. The operating rod is then manipulated to reciprocate the dasher for thorough intermixing of the catalyst with the base compound. After the mixing operation, the operating rod is withdrawn and the cartridge is ready for use in the air-powered gun. Preferably the cartridge kit includes not only the ram implement but also a suitable dispensing nozzle to be mounted in the dispensing outlet for the dispensing operation.

A particular characteristic of the normally closed insert valve which opens in response to pressure at the time of liquid admixture, is the fact that the opening of the valve is characterized by an axial shift of the valve which positions the valve to establish communication between the two chambers. In one embodiment of this valve, the communication is established after said axial shift, by providing appropriate passage means generally centrally through the valve member per se. In an alternate embodiment of the arrangement, the valve acts initially as a seal between the liquid, and upon the application of pressure, it shifts axially and is provided with means which operatively engage a related portion of the central chamber-defining rod and, as a result of such engagement and axial shift, deforms to effectively break the seal between the valve and the rod wall and, thereafter, to allow the liquid to escape through fluted openings or passages formed in the surface of the valve member.

An important advantage of the described practice of the invention is that the hohow plunger which contains the catalyst is protected by the cartridge shell and by the surrounding confined base material during the period that the cartridge is stored, shipped and handled prior to the actual mixing operation. If desired, however, the plunger may be shipped separate from the shell, with the dispensing outlet of the shell closed by a removable plug.

The various features and advantages of the invention may be readily understood from the following description taken with the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings, which are to be regarded as merely illustr ative FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the preferred embodi ment of the invention ready for shipment with the two ingredients separately stored therein;

FIGURE 2 is a view largely in cross-section and partly in side elevation showing the hollow operating rod, the dasher to which it may be releasably attached and the piston-like wall member that closes the open end of the cartridge shell;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary view of FIG- URE 2 showing the valve at the inner end of the hollow operating rod, the valve being in its closed position;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 3 with the valve in its open position;

FIGURE 5 is a transverse section taken as indicated by the line 5-5 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 6 is a view of an enlarged scale partly in side elevation and partly in section showing the construction of the piston that is mounted in the tubular operating rod;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary View partly in side elevation and partly in section showing the construction of the cartridge shell in the region of the dispensing outlet;

FIGURE 8 is a longitudinal sectional view of an alternate form of valve member that may be employed at the inner end of the tubular operating rod;

FIGURE 9 is a side elevation of a separate dispensing nozzle that is adapted for mounting in the dispensing outlet of the shell;

FIGURE 10 is a face view of the dasher that is shown in FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 11 is a View partly in side elevation and partly in section showing another form of dasher that may be employed;

FIGURE 12 is a sectional view of another embodiment of the invention in which the inner end of the tubular operating rod is closed by a frangible diaphragm;

FIGURE 13 is a similar view of the same embodiment showing how the frangible diaphragm may be ruptured in preparation for intermixing the two ingredients;

FIGURE 14 is a sectional view showing a shortened ram rod holding a piston at a limit position;

FIGURE 15 is a partially fragmentary, side elevational view of an alternate rod member 28b and incorporating another embodiment of the lower sealing valve;

FIGURE 16 is a side elevational view, partially in section, illustrating the valve embodiment of FIGURE 15 in an open position;

FIGURE 17 is a partially fragmentary, elevational detailed view of the valve member employed in the embodiment of FIGURE 15;

FIGURE 18 is an end elevational view taken from the right of the valve member shown in FIGURE 17;

FIGURE 19 is a perspective view of an alternate valve member that may be employed in the invention; and

FIGURE 20 is an end elevational view of the structure shown in FIGURE 15 and with the valve member of FIGURE 19 mounted in assembled relationship.

The presently preferred embodiment of the invention shown in the FIGURES 1 to 7, inclusive, is a disposable cartridge assembly for use in an air-powered dispensing gun. The principal parts of the cartridge assembly include: a thin-walled cylindrical shell 24 which is prefe'rably made of a suitable plastic material such as polyethylene, the cylindrical shell being open at one end and being formed at the other end with a neck 22 which defines a dispensing outlet 24; an end wall member 25 slidingly mounted in the open end of the shell Zil; a dasher 26; a tubular member 28 for releasable attachment to the dasher and having a handle or knob 3th at its outer end; a pressure-responsive valve member 32 initially closing the inner end of the tubular member 23; and a piston 34 slidingly mounted in the tubular member 28 at an initial position spaced substantially from the valve member 32.

The ingredient that is to make up a major portion of the final mixture is contained in the shell 20 and the ingredient which makes up the minor portion of the final mixture is confined in the tubular member 28 between the valve member 32 and the piston 34. In this instance, the major ingredient that is stored in the shell is the base material of the sealant and the catalyst for the sealant is stored inside the tubular member Zii.

Any suitable means may be employed to exert pressure on the piston for extrusion of the contents of the tubular member 28 into the interior of the shell 20 in preparation for the mixing operation. In the present prac tice of the invention, a ram rod 35 is included in the cartridge assembly for this purpose. The ram rod 35 may comprise simply a suitably dimensioned wooden stick with a rubber handle 36 on one end. The ram rod 35 may be suitably attached to the shell 24 for shipment, for example, by means of a rubber band 33.

In the selected embodiment of the invention, the open end of the shell 2t? is formed with a rim bead 46. The neck 22 of the shell may be formed with a similar rim bead 42 and may be further formed with an inner circumferential bead or rib 44, best shown in FIGURE 7, that is dimensioned to embrace the tubular member 28 in a fluid-tight manner. This inner head or rib is equivalent in function to an O-ring.

In this particular embodiment of the invention, the dispensing outlet 24 is formed with an internal screw thread 45 by means of which a suitable nozzle member may be mounted in the dispensing outlet for the final dispensing operation. FIGURE 9 shows such a dispensing nozzle 46 that may be mounted in the dispensing outlet, the nozzle being made of the same plastic material as the shell 20.

The end wall member 25 functions in the manner of a plunger or piston in the dispensing operation, the airpowered dispensing gun being adapted to drive the end wall member towards the dispensing outlet to cause the mixed ingredients to be dispensed by extrusion. In the construction shown, the end wall member 25 is a cupshaped member of the configuration shown in FIGURE 2. The cup-shaped member 25, which may be made of suitable material such as polyethylene, is formed with a cylindrical portion 48 and a dished or inwardly convex curved portion 50, the cylindrical portion being dimensioned for sliding fit in the shell 26 A feature of the invention is that the cup-shaped member 25 is formed with a thin, sharp flared circumferential lip 52. The lip 52 has an unrestrained diameter greater than the inside diameter of the shell 20 and, therefore, yieldingly presses outward to scrape the inner surface of the shell when the cup-shaped member is advanced relative to the shell.

As best shown in FIGURE 1, the dasher 26 has a central hub portion 54 and integral blade portions 55. The dasher Z6 is adapted for releasable connection with the tubular member 28 in any suitable manner. In the construction shown, the hub portion 54 of the dasher is formed with an internal screw thread (not shown) and the tubular member 28 is formed with a complementary screw thread 56 for releasable engagement therewith.

The leading side of the dasher 26 is of concave configuration to conform to the convex inner face of the cupshaped member 25. Thus, the dasher 26 is shaped to make intimate contact with the cup-shaped member 25 so that the blade portions may scrape the surface of the cupshaped member when the dasher is rotated while in contact therewith. For this purpose, the leading edge surfaces 58 of the blade portions 55 may be of the same curvature as the dished portion of the cup-shaped member 25.

The tubular member 28 may be made of suitable plastic material such as polyethylene. As best shown in FIGURE 3, the tubular member 28 may be reduced in inside diameter near its inner end to form a restricted discharge passage 60 with an inner circumferential shoulder 62 at the inner end of the discharge passage. In the construction shown in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4, the pressureresponsive valve member 32 that initially closes the restricted discharge passage 6i) has a stem portion 64 that is slidingly mounted in the discharge passage and has an enlargement or head 65 to serve as stop means for abutment against the shoulder 62. The valve member may be made of any suitable material such as polyethylene.

The valve member normally closes the restricted discharge passage 66 in the manner shown in FIGURES 2 and 3. The stem portion 64 is cut away, however, as indicated in the drawing, and the enlargement or head 65 has an aperture 66 therethrough. When the valve member 32 is shifted to its forward position by fluid pressure, it permits material to be extruded from the interior of the tubular member 28 through the restricted discharge passage 60 in the manner indicated in FIGURE 4.

The piston 34 is initially placed in the tubular member 28 in the position shown in FIGURE 2 to cooperate with the valve member 32 in confining a body of catalyst 63 in the tubular member. The piston 34 may be a body of polyethylene shown in FIGURE 6 which has a forwardly-flared, thin circumferential lip 70 for scraping contact with the inner circumferential surface of the tubular member 28. The piston 34 is further provided with an integral circumferential sealing rib 731. If one tubular member is out of round, the rib 71 of the piston will restore its configuration for effective sealing action.

As heretofore stated, it is preferable to employ the tubular member 28 as means for closing the dispensing outlet 24 of the shell during the period in which the cartridge assembly is stored, shipped and handled prior to the time for introducing the catalyst into the base sealant material. Employing the tubular member 28 as a closure for the dispensing outlet 24 makes it unnecessary to provide a separate stopper or plug for the dispensing outlet but it is to be understood that a separate stopper or plug may be used if desired. Another advantage of employing the tubular member 23 as means for closing the dispensing outlet 24 is that the shell 20 and the base material in the shell surround and protect the tubular member.

If the cartridge assembly is to be stored for any substantial period of time or is to be shipped, it is usually advisable to seal the open end of the shell 20 since the cup-shaped end wall member 25 may permit slight leakage. For this purpose, a thin-walled plastic sealing cap 72 may be fitted over the end of the shell. The sealing cap 72 is preferably of a well-known type available in commerce which is applied in wet state and shrinks drastically while drying. The shrink-fit of the sealing cap 72 around the rim bead 4th of the shell makes a fluid-tight construction.

The manner in which the described cartridge assembly serves its purpose may be readily understood from the foregoing description. FIGURE 1 shows the preferred manner in which the parts are assembled for shipment. The catalyst for the sealant mixture is stored in the tubular member 28 and the base material for the sealant is in the shell 20 surrounding the tubular member. The tubular member 28 is in screw-threaded engagement with the dasher 26 and is positioned with the dasher 26 contiguous to the cup-shaped end wall member 25. The ram rod is held against the shell by a rubber band 38. The sealing cap 72 prevents leakage from one end of the shell 26 and the inner rim bead 42 of the neck 22 of the shell embraces the tubular member 28 in a fluid-tight manner to prevent leakage from the other end of the shell. The piston 34 seals the outer end of the tubular member 28 and the valve member 32 is in its initial retracted position closing off the inner end of the tubular member.

When the time arrives for intermixing the two ingredients, the sealing cap 72 is removed and the tubular member 28 is retracted outward to the maximum to place the dasher 26 at the neck end of the shell 20. This with- E drawal movement of the tubular member 28 tends to form a void in the body of the base material of the sealant but the cup-shaped end Wall member 25 shifts inward under atmospheric pressure to compensate for the displaced volume of the tubular member.

The ram rod 35 is then inserted into the outer end of the tubular member 28 in position against the piston 34. The ram rod is used to force the piston 34 inwardly a small distance to cause the valve member 32 to shift to its open position under fluid pressure and to discharge a small increment of the catalyst into the base material. The tubular member 28 is then advanced a short distance and the piston 34 is again advanced a short distance to discharge another increment of the catalyst. These steps of slightly advancing the piston 34 and then slightly advancing the tubular member 28 are repeated until all of the catalyst is discharged from the tubular member 28 and the tubular member is at its innermost position adjacent the cup-shaped end wall member 25. The cupshaped end wall member is, of course, at this time slightly displaced outward from its initial position to accommodate the newly introduced catalyst. The described procedure of releasing the catalyst by increments through out the length of the cartridge is helpful in widely distributing the released catalyst to favor prompt uniform intermixture of the catalyst with the base material.

The mixing operation is carried out simply by reciprocating the dasher 26 by grasping the handle 30 on the end of the tubular member 28. Thorough and uniform intermixture of the two ingredients is promoted by rotating the handle 3th during each reciprocation of the dasher for simultaneous rotation of the dasher. The cup-shaped member 25 reciprocates slightly to compensate for the varying displacement of the tubular member 28.

It is important to note that when the valve member 32 is in its open position shown in FIGURE 4, the stem 64 of the valve member protrudes beyond the leading end of the tubular member 28 and that when the dasher 26 abuts the end Wall member 25 as indicated in FIGURE 1, the leading end of the tubular member 28 also abuts the end wall member. Thus on the first stroke of the mixing operation, the valve member 32 in its open position is forced against the end wall member 25 with the consequence that the valve member is pushed back to its retracted closed position. Thus the mixing operation automatically closes the valve to prevent back flow of the mixture through the tubular member 2% and the handle 30 to the atmosphere. Any suction effect created by the reciprocation of the tubular member 28 in the mixing operation causes inward displacement of the end wall member 25 rather than opening movement of the valve member 32 because the valve member fits tightly to resist movement and because the end Wall member not only moves more easily but also has such a large area exposed to the fluid pressure.

The mixing operation is terminated with the tubular member 28 at its innermost position with the dasher 26 abutting the cup-shaped end wall member 25. The handle 30 is then manipulated to unscrew the tubular member 28 from the dasher. To keep the dasher from rotating during this unscrewing action, the shell 20 may be squeezed in the region of the dasher. The tubular member 28 is then withdrawn with the shell 20 in upright position and the dispensing nozzle 46 is screwed into the dispensing outlet 24. The cartridge is then ready for use in the air-powered dispensing gun.

The flared circumferential lip 52 of the cup-shaped end wall member 25 serves as a scraper and prevents leakage during the period in which the cup-shaped member is reciprocated by reciprocation of the tubular member 28 in the mixing operation. This circumferential lip also serves as a scraper in the dispensing operation in which the air-powered gun forces the cup-shaped member inwardly for extrustion of the mixture from the dispensing nozzle 46.

FIGURE 8 shows a valve member, generally desig nated 32a, which may be substituted for the described value member 32 to perform the same function. The valve member 32a is a tubular member that is open at its inner end and closed at its outer end. The valve mem ber 3211 is formed with a stem portion 64a for slidingv fit in the previously mentioned restricted discharge passage 60 and is formed with an enlargement or head 65:: for abutment against the previously mentioned inner shoulder 62 of the tubular member 28. The tubular stem portion 64 has radial ports 74 which are closed by the surrounding wall of the restricted discharge passage 60 in the initial retracted position of the valve member. When fluid pressure forces the valve member 32a to its forward position, the radial ports 74 are carried beyond the outer end of the restricted discharge passage 6th and thus open to permit the extrusion of the content of the tubular member 28.

FIGURE 11 shows a dasher, generally designated 26a which may be substituted for the previously described dasher 26. The dasher 26a has the usually internally threaded hub portion 54a and the usual blade portions 55a. In this instance, however, the dasher is further provided with a cylindrical rim portion '75 which is dimensioned for snugly fitting in the shell for scraping action on the inner surface of the shell in the course of the mixing operation.

Another embodiment of the invention shown in FIG- URES 12 and 13 is largely similar to the first embodiment as indicated by the use of corresponding numerals to indicate corresponding parts disposable cartridge has; the usual shell 20:: that is formed with a neck 22a and a dispensing outlet 24a. The end of the shell 20a is provided with a slidable end wall member 25a having the usual dished portion 50a. The juncture between the shell 20a and the end wall member is closed by a cap 76 which is formed with an inner circumferential groove 73 to engage a radial flange 79 of the shell ltla. After the cap 76 is assembled to the shell 20a the whole device is sprayed with a suitable plastic such as liquid nylon to form a coating 80 that seals the assembly including the cap 76. This coating is readily peeled off when the time comes to operate the device.

The dispensing outlet 24:: is initially closed in the usual manner by a tubular member 28a which is formed with the usual knob or handle a on its outer end. The shell 20a contains a body 82 of the base material and the tubular member 28a contains a body 68 of the catalyst. The catalyst 68 is confined in the tubular member 28a between the usual piston 34a and a frangible diaphragm 34 that initially closes the inner end of the tubular member. The frangible diaphragm 84 may be a thin member of a suitable plastic material or may be a sheet of metal foil. In the construction shown the diaphragm 84 is cup-shaped to embrace the screw thread 56a at the inner end of the tubular member 2811 so that the frangible diaphragm is anchored by the threaded engagement of the dasher 26a with the tubular member. The dasher 26a is of the usual construction. Thus, the dasher has the usual contral hub portion 54a and the usual blade portions 55a.

Any suitable means may be provided to rupture the frangible diaphragm 34 when the time comes to mix the catalyst with the base material. In this particular embodiment of the invention the end wall member 25a has an axially positioned pointed portion 85 for this purpose.

During shipment and handling prior to actual use of the disposable cartridge the tubular member 23a is retracted relative to the pointed portion 85 of the end wall member 25a. It may be desirable to provide some kind of temporary retaining means to avoid accidental advance of the tubular member. For this purpose the tubular member 28a may be formed with an outer circumferential groove 86 (FIGURE 13) and an easily removable split retaining ring 88 may initially embrace the groove 86 as 8 shown in FIGURE 12 to serve as a stop to limit the inward axial movement of the tubular member 28a.

The usual ram rod 35a may accompany the disposable unit. The ram rod 35a is initially secured to the shell :Ztta by means of the usual rubber band 38a.

The manner in which this last embodiment of the invention serves its purpose is readily apparent. When it is desired to put the disposable cartridge to use the seal- .ing cap 76 is removed and the handle 30a is used to ad- 'vance the tubular member 28a towards the end wall member 25a until the pointed portion of the end wall mem- 'ber penetrates and ruptures the frangible diaphragm 84 as shown in FIGURE 13. Since the advance of the tubular member 28a displaces a corresponding portion of the base material 82, the end wall member 25a is forced to :shift axially outward as shown in FIGURE 13 to accom- .modate the increase in volume.

The tubular member 28a is then withdrawn to the maximum permitted by the dasher 26a and since this Withdrawal movement tends to form a void in the material $2, the end wall member 25a: shifts inward under atmospheric pressure to a position that is axially inward from the initial position shown in FIGURE 12.

The ram rod 355! is then inserted into the outer end of the tubular member 28a as heretofore described. The ram rod is used to force the piston 34a inwardly a small distance to discharge a small increment of the catalyst 68 into the base material 82. The tubular member 28a is then advanced a short distance and the piston 34a is again advanced a short distance to discharge another increment of the catalyst. These steps are repeated until all of the catalyst is discharged from the tubular member 28a, the end Wall member 25a, shifting accordingly.

The mixing operation is then carried out by reciprocating and rotating the handle 30a for corresponding reciprocation and rotatation of the dasher 26a. It is contemplated that the piston 34:: enlarged by its circumferential rib 71a will fit so tightly that it will not retract outward in response to any pressure created by the mixing operation. If the piston does not start to retract it may be easily returned to its limit position by the ram rod 35a.

FIGURE 14 shows how a ram rod 35b may be dimensioned in length to be flush with the handle 30a when the piston 34a is at its inner limit position. The operators hand that grasps the handle 30a serves as a stop against the ram rod 35b and thus prevents retraction of the piston 34a during the mixing operation. After the mixing operation the handle 30a is manipulated to unscrew the tubular member 28a from the dasher, the shell being manually squeezed in the region of the dasher to prevent rotation of the dasher. The tubular member 28a is then replaced by the previously mentioned dispensing nozzle 46 to complete the preparation of the cartridge for use in the air-powered dispensing gun.

Attention is now directed to FIGURES 15 to 18, inclusive, which illustrate an alternate valve arrangement for sealing the discharge end of the tube 28b and accommodating opening thereof on the exertion of pressure on the contained liquid and in a manner heretofore described with reference to the embodiment of FIGURE 2. Considering FIGURE 15 specifically, it will be noted that the valve member 99 comprises an annular head or cap 100 which is disposed within the main passage 102 of the tube 23b. The valve member 99 is preferably of unitary construction and composed of a flexible plastic material for reasons which will hereinafter appear. The head 100 is provided with a diameter of such dimension that it annularly engages said inner surface 102 as at 104 in a sealing manner, thereby preventing the escape of the fluid within the tube 28b. The tube 28b additionally is provided with a dispensing orifice or port 166 at its inner end and the valve member further includes a centrally projecting column 108 extending into the orifice 106 and in close guidable engagement therewith. Thus, the coopera- 9 tive fit of the post 108 within the opening 106 accommodates the guided movement of the valve as will hereinafter be described.

Briefly considering the disclosures of FIGURES 17 and 18, it will be noted that the post 108 is provided with a plurality of flutes 110 formed in the annular surface of the post and extending longitudinally thereof from a point immediately adjacent the lower side of the cap 1%. It will thus be apparent that continuous passages are provided by the flutes 110 through the passage 1% of the tube 281;. A plurality of bosses or nubs 112 are integrally formed with and project from the lower surface of the cap 100. In the preferred embodiment of the invention, the bosses 112 are equally spaced around the lower periphery of the cap 1%. Additionally, the cap 100 may be provided with a hollow cavity as at 114, thereby providing a weaker segment of the wall 116 annularly around the inner terminus of the post 168.

Returning to FIGURES and 16, it will be seen that the tube 28b and particularly the inside thereof is provided with a tapering abutment 120 at its inner end and immediately adjacent the port 1%. The abutment may take any particular configuration; however, the tapering characteristic thereof aids smooth liquid flow during the discharging operation. The abutment 120, of course, is in linear alignment with the bosses 112 formed on the underside of the cap 1%. Thus, as fluid pressure is increased as heretofore described, the pressure of said fluid urges the valve member to shift axially of the tube 2812, bringing the abutment into engagement with the bosses 112 on the underside of the cap 1%. As pressure increases, the abutment 120 resists the axial shift of the valve member by virtue of its engagement with the bosses 112 and further induces a bending of the cap 1% at the weakened section 116 which results in an opening or fracture of the sealing relation between the cap 100 and the inner surface of the passage 1%. Thus, an annular opening 122 is provided around the cap 1% to accommodate fluid exit intermediate the bosses 112 and through the fluted cavities 11th in the post 168. An additional advantage or feature of the embodiment now being considered is the fact that upon release of pressure within the tube 28b, the flexible cap 14% returns to its original shape and again establishes a sealing relationship with the surface 102 of the tube 281), and as shown in FIGURE 15.

FIGURES 19 and illustrate yet another valve that may be employed in operative association with the tube 280. As will be seen in FIGURE 19, the valve member indicated generally at 15h comprises a cap 152 and a forwardly-projecting stem 154. The stem 154 is generally planar in end elevational configuration and is defined by opposed parallel surfaces 156 and 158. The narrow tran verse dimension of the stem 154- is defined by opposed arcuate surfaces 160 and 162, each having a curvature complementing the radius of the inner surface of the port 1%. By virtue of this construction, the surfaces let and 168 guidably control the movement of the valve 150 during the action hereinafter described.

The stem 154 is additionally provided with opposed, outwardly tapering surfaces 164 and 166, the taper of said surfaces approximately corresponding to the taper of the abutting surfaces 120 of the tube 280. The cap 152 is provided with an annular peripheral surface 17% having a radius of curvature corresponding to the radius of the inner tube surface 1&2 whereby the peripheral surface 176 of the valve member 151) is normally in intimate surface engagement with the surface ltlZ to sealingly separate the contents of the tube 28b from communication with the outlet port 1%. The inner surface of the cap 152 may be cupped as at 172 to form a piston-like structure, the purpose of which will be hereinafter described.

It will be specifically understood that the valve member 150 is again composed of a flexible plastic material. Thus, in the operation of the device, when pressure is caused to exist within the tube 28c, the valve member 150 is moved axially of the tube whereby the cam surfaces 164 and 166 are brought into physical engagement with the abutment surfaces 12% formed internally of the tube. As the surfaces 164 and 166 engage the abutments 12d, and under the continued application of pressure on the cap 152 of the valve member 150, it will be understood that opposed segments of the cap existent on either side of the stem 154- deform axially of the valve member. This axial deformation is consonant with the axial shift above described. As opposed segments of the cap 152 do deform the seal formerly existent between the peripheral surface 174 of the cap 152 and the inner surface 102 of the tube 28c is broken and communication is established between the inner volume of the tube 28b and the outlet port 106 and along opposed sides of the planar valve stem 154 through the openings 178, 178 whereby the contents of the tube 28c is allowed to escape.

The embodiment illustrated in FIGURES 19 and 20 is thus substantially similar in structure and operation to the embodiment heretofore described in the structure shown in FIGURES 16 to 18, inclusive. It will be understood that in both of the immediately above referred to embodiments, fluid exit is accommodated by deformation of the sealing cap of the particular valve member.

My description and specific detail of the selected embodiments of the invention will suggest various changes, substitutions and other departures from my disclosure within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

a wall member separate from said normally closed dispensing outlet movable to extrude the contents of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

a dasher mounted in said shell;

a tubular member to contain the second of said ingredients and to extend through said dispensing out let into engagement with said dasher for manual reciprocation of the dasher;

and means initially closing the inner end of said tubular member, said closing means being adapted to be opened to place the interior of said tubular member in communication with the interior of said shell to provide a flow path for extrusion of said second ingredient from the tubular member into the shell for intermixture with the first ingredient.

2. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

which includes an elongated ram member for insertion into said tubular member for extruding the second ingredient from the tubular member.

3. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

in which said dasher has radially extending portions in the form of pitched blades for a rotary effect on the contents of the shell when the dasher is reciprocated.

4. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

in which said dasher has a circumferential rim portion to scrape material from the inner surfaces of said shell.

5. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

in which said tubular member initially extends through said dispensing outlet and thereby initially closes the outlet.

6. The combination as set forth in claim 5,

in which said shell is made of flexible plastic material and is formed with an inner circumferential rib at said dispensing outlet to embrace said tubular memher in a sealing manner.

7. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell being open at one of its ends and having a normally closed dispensing outlet at its other end;

to conform with the end wall member. 11. A dual compartment container for separately stor- 12 being open at one of its ends and having a normally closed dispensing outlet at its other end; a wall member separate from said normally closed dispensing outlet movable to extrude the contents of the an end wall member slidingly mounted inside said shell through said dispensing outlet;

shell near its open end to close the open end, said a dasher mounted in said shell; wall member being movable to extrude the contents a tubular member to contain the second of said inof the shell through said dispensing outlet; gredients, said tubular member initially extending a cup-shaped membrane removably embracing and through and closing said dispensing outlet and being sealing the open end of said shell; 1 releasably engaged at its inner end with said dasher a dasher mounted in said shell; for manual reciprocation of the dasher, said tubular a tubular member to contain the second of said inmember being open at both ends;

gredients and to extend through said dispensing outclosure means slidingly mounted in the inner end of let into engagement with said dasher for manual said tubular member for movement from a normal reciprocation of the dasher; 15 closed position to an open position;

means initially closing the inner end of said tubular and a piston in said tubular member spaced from member, said closing means being operable by mansaid closure means for cooperation therewith to ually exerted force to open the inner end of the confine said second ingredient, said piston being tubular member; accessible through said tubular member from the and a piston in said tubular member spaced from outer end thereof for displacement towards said said closing means for cooperation therewith to closure means to create pressure inside the tubular confine said second ingredient, said piston being acmember for moving the closure means to its open cessible through said tubular member from the position and for extrusion of said second ingredient outer end thereof for displacement towards said from the tubular member into the shell for intermixclosing means to create pressure inside the tubular ture with the first ingredient. means for extrusion of said second ingredient from 12. A combination as set forth in claim 11, the tubular means into the shell for intermixture in which a portion of said closure means is positioned with the first ingredient. for contact with said end wall member at the open 8. A dual compartment container for separately storposition of the closure means and at the inner limit ing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two position of said tubular member for retraction of the ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, eomprisingl closure means to its closed position by the end wall a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell member i response t nt of th tubular being open at one of its ends and having a normally member t it inner li it iti Closed dispensing Outlet fltits other 13. A dual compartment container for separately storan end Wall member slidingly mounted inside Said Shell ing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two innear its p end to Close the p end, Said Wall gredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising: member being movable to eXtYude the contents of a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell the Shell through Said dispensing Outlet, Said end having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of wall member having a forwardly extending flared i ends; resilieht circumferential seahng hp in scrzfpihg an end wall member at the other end of the shell cotact with the circumferential surface of said shell; Operating with the Shell to f a container Said a cup'shaped mPmberane emhracmg and Seahng the container being collapsible to extrude the contents open end of Sa1(1 She1 1 of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

a dasher mounted 1n sa1d Shah; a dasher mounted in said shell;

a h member to cohtalh the secohd h sa1d r a tubular member to contain the second of said ingredlehts and to extend through sa1d chspehslhg 0 gredients and to extend throu h said dispensing outoutlet into engagement with said dasher for manual let into engagement with saidvdasher for manual h hh of h dasheh; ciprocation of the dasher;

means hhhahy, closlhg the lhher of sa1d tubular frangible means initially closing the inner end of said member, said closing means being operable by mantubular member; exertedjorce to open the Inner q of the tubu' means on said end wall member to rupture said frangilar membeh 1h mspohse to pressure mslde the tubu ble means to place the interior of the tubular memlar h her in communication with the interior of the shell;

and a piston in sa1d tubular member spaced from said nd i ton id tubal member aced from said closing means for cooperation therewith to confine r" a a m Sa at Sp said second ingredient, said piston being accessible frhnglble mehns coopehahoh therewhh to cohhhe through Said tubular member from the Outer end sa1d second ingredlent, said piston being accessible thereof for displacement towards said closing means through sa1d tubular member from the Outer end to create pressure inside the tubular member f thereof for manual displacement towards the inner extrusion of said second ingredient from the tubular end of t e t lar mem er for extrusion of said member into the shell for intermixture with the second ingredient from the tubular member into the first ingredient. shell for intermixture with the first ingredient.

A m i n as set forth in l im 14. A combination as set forth in claim 13,

in which Said Wall member has a forwardly flared in which said frangible means is a diaphragm across silient circumferential sealing lip in scraping conthe inner end 0f Said tubular member; i u the mher clrchmferehhal Surface of sa1d and in which said means to rupture the frangible means Z c'ombinafion as Set forth in claim is, zltlpointid puncturing means unitary with said end in which said wall member is of inwardly convex 15 2 configuration; combination as set forth in claim 1,

and in which said dasher is of concave configuration 1h Whlch sa1d tubular member and sa1d Plstoh are both made of plastic and said piston is formed with an outer circumferential rib for sealing contact with the tubular member.

ing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising: a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell 16. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two in- 13 gredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

a shell to contain one of the two ingredients, said shell having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

an end wall member closing the other end of the shell and forming therewith a container, said container being collapsible to extrude the contents of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

a dasher mounted in said shell;

a tubular member to contain the second of said ingredients and to extend through said dispensing outlet into engagement with said dasher for manual reciprocation of the dasher;

means initially closing the inner end of said tubular member, said closing means being adapted to be opened to place the interior of said tubular member in communication with the interior of said shell;

a piston in said tubular member spaced from the closing means for cooperation therewith to confine said second ingredient, said piston being accessible through said tubular member from the outer end thereof for displacement towards said closing means to create pressure inside the tubular member for extrusion of said second ingredient from the tubular member into the shell for intermixture with the first ingredient;

and a ram member for insertion into said tubular member to displace said piston to an inner limit position for extrusion of the second ingredient into the shell.

17. The combination as set forth in claim 16,

in which the ram member is of a length to lie in said tubular member substantially flush with the outer end of the tubular member when the piston is at said inner limit position whereby with an operators hand covering the outer end of the tubular member the ram member will prevent outward movement of the piston.

18. A multiple compartment container for separately storing a plurality of ingredients and arranged to accornmodate admixture thereof upon appropriate manual manipulation, comprising:

a shell having one of the ingredients therein,

a constriction at one end of the shell defining a primary dispensing port for dispensing of the ingredients after admixture thereof,

piston means closing the other end of the shell and movable therethrough upon pressure exertion thereon to dispense the mixed ingredients through said primary dispensing port,

rod means extending through the primary dispensing port and defining therewith a secondary chamber containing one of said ingredients,

said rod means having a secondary dispensing port at the inner end thereof,

valve means operatively arranged in said secondary dispensing port to provide a seal between the secondary chamber and the shell,

means to exert a pressure on the ingredient in said secondary chamber,

said valve means being formed and arranged to shift axially of the rod in response to pressure exerted by said ingredient and thereby to permit communication between said shell and said secondary chamber as a result of said axial shift.

19. A dual compartment container according to claim 18,

wherein said valve means comprises a flexible valve member including a cap disposed in said secondary chamber and in sealing relation therewith,

abutment means on the rod adjacent the terminus of said secondary chamber,

means on the valve member to physically engage the abutment upon pressure responsive axial shift of the valve member,

said last mentioned means being operative to deform said cap and establish communication between the secondary chamber and the shell as a result of said deformation.

20. A dual compartment container for separately storing a plurality of ingredients comprising:

an elongated cylinder defining a primary storage chamber for one of said ingredients and composed of flexible material,

a dispensing opening at one point on the cylinder,

a secondary storage element demountably disposed in said opening and normally closing same,

said secondary storage element defining a secondary storage chamber therein for the other of said ingredients,

said secondary element having an opening therein disposed within said primary storage chamber,

valve means within said secondary storage element and normally closing said last mentioned opening,

said valve means being responsive to the application of pressure on the ingredient stored in said secondary element to open said last mentioned opening and establish communication with the primary storage chamber and thereby accommodate admixture of the ingredients,

and means for applying pressure to the ingredient in said secondary chamber.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,166,437 Howie et al. July 18, 1939 2,214,202 Odell et al. Sept. 10, 1940 2,487,236 Greenberg Nov. 8, 1949 2,733,836 Switzer Feb. 7, 1956 2,831,606 Alters Apr. 22, 1958 2,838,210 Detrie et a1. June 10, 1958 2,954,144 Elam et al Sept. 27, 1960 3,007,611 Coolidge Nov. 7, 1961 3,013,697 Gill Dec. 19, 1961 3,028,052 Archer Apr. 3, 1962 3,080,094 Modderno Mar. 5, 1963 3,082,914 Gill Mar. 26, 1963 FOREIGN PATENTS 326,854 Great Britain Mar. 21, 1930

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2166437 *Feb 16, 1938Jul 18, 1939Howie James EMixing and molding device
US2214202 *Mar 20, 1939Sep 10, 1940Defender Photo Supply CompanyPhotographic developer package
US2487236 *Dec 31, 1947Nov 8, 1949Alvin A GreenbergCompartmented container having a rupturable partition
US2733836 *Oct 7, 1952Feb 7, 1956 Perforator and container for packaged grease
US2831606 *Nov 16, 1956Apr 22, 1958Eugene Alters MerleMethod and device for kneading and removing a viscous material from its container
US2838210 *Dec 21, 1954Jun 10, 1958Douglas Aircraft Co IncSealant dispensing device
US2954144 *Oct 17, 1957Sep 27, 1960Hiller Aircraft CorpStorage, mixing and dispensing device
US3007611 *Jul 9, 1959Nov 7, 1961Coolidge Paul CMetering dispenser for flowable materials
US3013697 *Jan 21, 1959Dec 19, 1961Wilbur GillMixing and dispensing device
US3028052 *Jun 1, 1959Apr 3, 1962John E ArcherMold-filling device
US3080094 *Apr 29, 1958Mar 5, 1963Modern Lab IncCompartmented pressurized container valve assembly and a cutter therefor
US3082914 *Nov 6, 1958Mar 26, 1963Gill WilburDispensing device
GB326854A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3181737 *Sep 30, 1963May 4, 1965R H Macy & Co IncMethod of storing, combining and applying two-part polymer mixtures
US3260284 *Mar 5, 1964Jul 12, 1966Delman CoWindshield washer
US3266671 *Dec 16, 1963Aug 16, 1966Kenneth GelpeyCompartmented dispenser for plural fluids
US3365417 *Mar 11, 1965Jan 23, 1968Grace W R & CoMethod and apparatus for mixing catalyst with resin
US3370754 *Dec 21, 1966Feb 27, 1968Products Res & Chemical CorpSyringe for mixing and dispensing two ingredients
US3437242 *Nov 21, 1966Apr 8, 1969Poitras Edward JFluid storing,mixing and dispensing apparatus
US3475010 *Apr 24, 1968Oct 28, 1969Prod Res & Chem CorpDispensing cartridge for intermixing separate ingredients
US3511239 *Aug 15, 1967May 12, 1970Penicillin Ges Dauelsberg & CoMulti-chamber syringe
US3519250 *Jun 26, 1967Jul 7, 1970Feb Great Britain LtdStorage and handling of chemical substances
US3532316 *Apr 4, 1967Oct 6, 1970Hilti AgFastening element for adhesive bonding to a support
US3707146 *Mar 7, 1967Dec 26, 1972Prod Res & Chem CorpMeans to inject a plastic into a cavity to produce a replica thereof
US3735900 *May 13, 1971May 29, 1973Prod Res & Chem CorpDual ingredient storage, intermixing and dispensing storage
US4014463 *Nov 28, 1975Mar 29, 1977Kenics CorporationPlural component dispenser
US4193698 *Feb 7, 1979Mar 18, 1980Veit GartnerDevice for rupturing a frangible partition between separate chambers in a container
US4197967 *Aug 9, 1978Apr 15, 1980Denso-Chemie Wedekind KgPiston-cylinder unit particularly for an extrusion cartridge
US4208133 *Jan 8, 1979Jun 17, 1980Korte-Jungermann Gesellschaft fur Fassadenbau und Befesstigungstechnik mit beschrankter HaftungInjection cartridge
US4261481 *Aug 8, 1978Apr 14, 1981General DynamicsFluid packaging kit for pressurized dispensing
US4272199 *Feb 27, 1976Jun 9, 1981Hade Horace AMixing container
US4366919 *Apr 20, 1979Jan 4, 1983Coaxial Cartridges, Inc.Composite cartridge and device for metering extrusion of contents
US4408690 *Jun 10, 1982Oct 11, 1983Ferrero S.P.A.Beverage container pierceable by a drinking straw
US4483439 *Feb 18, 1982Nov 20, 1984Wella AktiengesellschaftTwo-component packaging for pourable media
US4643309 *Mar 21, 1986Feb 17, 1987Astra Lakemedel AbFilled unit dose container
US4648532 *May 9, 1986Mar 10, 1987Green Russell DMixing and discharge capsule
US4676406 *Sep 29, 1986Jun 30, 1987Upat & Co., GmbhSquirt cartridge for mixing and dispensing a two-component mass
US4712715 *Jul 7, 1986Dec 15, 1987Artur FischerDevice for injecting a fixing agent into a drilled hole for anchoring a fastening element inserted in a drilled hole
US4826047 *Jun 30, 1988May 2, 1989E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyHand held dispenser for mixing and dispensing two viscous components
US5044758 *Mar 23, 1989Sep 3, 1991William KurtzCaulk and transfer apparatus
US5158214 *Mar 11, 1991Oct 27, 1992Jnj Industries Inc.Solder paste applicator and mixing tool
US5301842 *Feb 21, 1992Apr 12, 1994Frank RitterMulticomponent cartridge for plastic materials
US5310091 *May 12, 1993May 10, 1994Tremco, Inc.Dual product dispenser
US5501371 *Jul 7, 1994Mar 26, 1996Schwartz-Feldman; JeanMixing syringe
US5680967 *Sep 13, 1996Oct 28, 1997Courtaulds Aerospace, Inc.Dispensing cartridge
US5934803 *Oct 30, 1997Aug 10, 1999Physical Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method for mixing multi-part reaction materials under vacuum
US6302574Oct 14, 1998Oct 16, 2001Kwan-Ho ChanPrepackaged liquid bone cement dispenser
US6343718Oct 15, 1998Feb 5, 2002Loctite CorporationUnit dose dispense package
US6409972Jun 6, 1995Jun 25, 2002Kwan-Ho ChanPoly(alkyl methacrylate) kit which can be readily utilized in the operating room; two prepackaged components without requiring either high vacuum mixing or centrifugation; liquid, powder, polymerization initiator, stabilizer
US6547432 *Oct 17, 2001Apr 15, 2003Stryker InstrumentsBone cement mixing and delivery device for injection and method thereof
US6599293Jul 16, 2001Jul 29, 2003Stryker InstrumentsDelivery device for bone cement
US6655828 *Nov 15, 2001Dec 2, 2003Depuy Orthopaedics, Inc.Bone cement mixing apparatus having improved mixing blade configuration
US6736537Aug 27, 2002May 18, 2004Stryker InstrumentsBone cement mixing and delivery device for injection and method thereof
US6796987Jun 11, 2002Sep 28, 2004Stryker InstrumentsDelivery device for bone cement
US7018089Sep 10, 2003Mar 28, 2006Kyphon Inc.Apparatus and methods for mixing two components
US7134782Mar 16, 2004Nov 14, 2006Stryker InstrumentsBone cement mixing and delivery device with releasable mixing blade
US7306361Feb 8, 2006Dec 11, 2007Stryker CorporationBone cement mixing and delivery system with multiple advancement mechanisms and method of use
US7311195 *Oct 1, 2002Dec 25, 2007Alfred Schmid Ag GossauMixing capsule and method for activating the same
US7320540Mar 27, 2006Jan 22, 2008Stryker CorporationBone cement mixing and delivery device with releasable mixing blade
US7393342Aug 13, 2007Jul 1, 2008Stryker CorporationBone cement mixing and delivery system including a delivery gun and a cartridge having a piston, the delivery gun configured to release the piston
US7537139May 27, 2005May 26, 2009Henkel CorporationDual chamber piston pressure pack dispenser system
US7677418Jun 13, 2008Mar 16, 2010Stryker CorporationBone cement cartridge with a releasably locked drive piston, the piston configured to be unlocked by a delivery device
US7915046Nov 10, 2009Mar 29, 2011Depuy Products, Inc.System and method for determining the operating state of orthopaedic admixtures
US8061887 *Feb 12, 2010Nov 22, 2011Stryker CorporationCartridge in which bone cement is mixed and from which bone cement is delivered, the cartridge having a compressible blade with plural vanes
US8206143Feb 20, 2009Jun 26, 2012Biomet Manufacturing Corp.Modular articulating cement spacer
US8256949 *Dec 24, 2008Sep 4, 2012Cook Medical Technologies LlcApparatus and method for mixing and dispensing a bone cement mixture
US8348494 *May 14, 2012Jan 8, 2013Cook Medical Technologies LlcVertebroplasty cement mixer injector device
US8353622Nov 11, 2011Jan 15, 2013Stryker CorporationCartridge from which bone cement is discharged, the cartridge having a removably coupled nozzle
US8394105Mar 14, 2006Mar 12, 2013DePuy Synthes Products, LLCApparatus for dispensing bone cement
US8480289 *Aug 22, 2008Jul 9, 2013Biomet Manufacturing, LlcBone cement mixing cartridge and method of use
US8540123Jun 11, 2012Sep 24, 2013Cook Medical Technologies LlcApparatus and method for mixing and dispensing a bone cement mixture
US8561845 *Dec 22, 2010Oct 22, 20133M Innovative Properties CompanyCapsule for two-component materials
US8574237Dec 30, 2005Nov 5, 2013DePuy Synthes Products, LLCMethod and apparatus for predicting the operating points of bone cement
US8631973 *Jun 29, 2010Jan 21, 2014Heraeus Kulzer GmbhSingle-use cartridges for the storing and dispensing of dental two-component impression materials
US8668375 *Jun 7, 2013Mar 11, 2014Biomet Manufacturing, LlcBone cement mixing cartridge and method of use
US8721600Nov 30, 2012May 13, 2014Stryker CorporationDelivery gun for dispensing bone bement from a cartridge, the gun having a multi-link linkage and capable of dispensing the cement at different flow rates
US20090171361 *Dec 24, 2008Jul 2, 2009Melsheimer Jeffry SApparatus and method for mixing and dispensing a bone cement mixture
US20100202246 *Apr 28, 2008Aug 12, 2010Wolf-Ruediger HuckMulticomponent packaging
US20100330525 *Jun 29, 2010Dec 30, 2010Haraeus Kulzer GmbhSingle-use cartridges for the storing and dispensing of dental two-component impression materials
US20110084094 *Dec 22, 2010Apr 14, 20113M Innovative Properties CompanyCapsule for two-component materials
USRE33801 *Aug 15, 1988Jan 21, 1992Dentsply Research & Development Corp.Mixing and discharge capsule
DE2628694A1 *Jun 25, 1976Dec 29, 1977Veit GaertnerBehaelter zum getrennten aufbewahren von zu vermischenden komponenten
DE2628695A1 *Jun 25, 1976Dec 29, 1977Veit GaertnerWerkzeug zum oeffnen einer durchtrennbaren wand zwischen separaten kammern eines behaelters
DE2800587A1 *Jan 7, 1978Jul 12, 1979Korte Jungermann Ges Fuer FassSpritz-kartusche
DE2808230A1 *Feb 25, 1978Aug 30, 1979Korte Jungermann Ges Fuer FassSpritz-kartusche
DE2848083A1 *Nov 6, 1978May 14, 1980Siemens AgMischkartusche fuer mehrkomponenten- giessharze
DE2939953A1 *Oct 2, 1979Apr 9, 1981Siemens AgMischkartusche fuer mehrkomponenten-giessharze
DE3439975A1 *Nov 2, 1984Jun 20, 1985Upat Max Langensiepen KgInjection cartridge
DE3524289A1 *Jul 6, 1985Jan 8, 1987Fischer Artur Dr H CVorrichtung zum ausspritzen eines bindemittels fuer die verankerung eines befestigungselementes in einem bohrloch
DE3708803A1 *Mar 18, 1987Sep 29, 1988Fischbach A Kunststoff KgMischvorrichtung fuer pastoese mehrkomponenten-massen
DE3715682A1 *May 11, 1987Nov 24, 1988Stefan Dr LuethVorrichtung zum herstellen eines zweikomponentengemisches
DE8815473U1 *Dec 13, 1988Feb 9, 1989Zimmermann, Karl, 5000 Koeln, DeTitle not available
EP0188981A1 *Dec 19, 1985Jul 30, 1986Claude BossonDouble chamber mixing syringe
EP0194508A2 *Feb 26, 1986Sep 17, 1986Hans-Werner Korte-JungermannInjector cartridge
EP0244583A1 *Feb 27, 1987Nov 11, 1987fischerwerke Artur Fischer GmbH & Co. KGDispensing cartridge filled with at least two separate components of hardenable material
EP1016452A2 *Nov 12, 1996Jul 5, 2000Cemvac System AktiebolagMethod and device for mixing components for bone cement in a mixing vessel
EP2269536A2 *Jun 21, 2010Jan 5, 2011Heraeus Kulzer GmbHDisposable cartridges for storing and applying dental dual component casting compounds
WO1989005763A1 *Dec 14, 1988Jun 29, 1989Upat Max Langensiepen KgSpray cartridge
WO1998011002A1 *Sep 12, 1997Mar 19, 1998Courtaulds Aerospace IncDispensing cartridge
WO2003008080A1Jan 31, 2002Jan 30, 2003Stryker InstrBone cement mixing and delivery device for injection and method thereof
WO2004026377A1 *Sep 10, 2003Apr 1, 2004Kyphon IncApparatus and methods for mixing two components
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/136, 222/137, 156/500, 206/222, 222/215, 366/191, 222/129, 222/386, 222/327
International ClassificationB01F7/00, B01F13/00, B05C17/005, B65D81/32, B01F15/00, B05C17/01, B01F15/02, B01F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/3255, B01F15/0237, B01F15/0212, B05C17/01, B01F15/0278, B01F7/00208, B05C17/00553, B01F15/0266, B01F11/0054, B01F13/002, B01F15/0224, B01F15/0205, B05C17/00566
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, B01F15/02C40D, B01F15/02B40H, B01F15/02B20D, B01F15/02B6N, B05C17/005F6, B01F11/00F, B05C17/005F, B01F7/00B14A, B65D81/32G, B01F15/02B6