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Publication numberUS3145400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 25, 1964
Filing dateApr 8, 1963
Priority dateApr 8, 1963
Publication numberUS 3145400 A, US 3145400A, US-A-3145400, US3145400 A, US3145400A
InventorsJohn D Yoakum
Original AssigneeJohn D Yoakum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marine vehicle
US 3145400 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 25, 1964 J. D. YOAKUM 3,145,400

MARINE VEHICLE V Filed April 8, 196:5 vs Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

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Au 25, 1964' v J. D. *OAKUM 3, 45, 00,

. 1 MARINE VEHICLE Filed April 8, 1 9 63 s Sheets-Sheet 2 IIIIIIIIIIIIA INVENTOR. Jay/v D. 70A Kz/M Arron/5Y5.

Aug. 25, 1964 ,J. D."YOAKUMY v 3,145,400 j v MARINE VEHICLE v v I Filed April 8, 1963 {Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR.

gay/v 0. MA KUM United States Patent 3,145,400 MARINE VEHICLE John D. Yoakunl, 1910 E. Elm, Springfield, M0. Filed Apr. 8, 1963, Ser. No. 271,326 3 Claims. (Cl. 9-310) This invention relates to a. marine vehicle of the type generally referred to as aquaplanes or water skis and similar apparatus used in aquatic sports and designed to be ridden when drawn along on the surface of the water.

More specifically, the invention relates to a marine vehicle adapted to be towed on the surface of the water by a boat.

An object of the invention is a marine vehicle ridable and maneuverable when towed at moderate speeds and which can be ridden by a person with a modest amount of skill.

Another object of the invention is a marine vehicle capable of being ridden by a person in either a standing or sitting position.

A further object of the invention is a marine vehicle having a novel construction affording considerably more stability than those presently in use.

Another object of the invention is a marine Vehicle having a simple and practical construction and which can be manufactured at modest cost.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent by referring to the following detailed description when taken with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of one form in which the marine vehicle according to the present invention may be constructed.

FIGURE 2 is a side elevatoinal view of the marine vehicle illustrated in FIG. 1.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken on lines 3-3 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional View taken on lines 4-4 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on line 5-5 of FIG. 1.

FIGURE 6 is a plan view illustrating a slightly modified form of construction of the instant invention.

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged sectional view taken on lines 7-7 of FIG. 6.

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view taken on lines 8-8 of FIG. 6.

FIGURE 9 is a plan view of a further modification of the invention described herein.

FIGURE 10 is a cross-sectional view taken on lines Iii-10 of FIG. 9.

FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary sectional view-taken on lines 11-11 of FIG. 9.

FIGURE 12 illustrates another form of the invention wherein two marine vehicles of the type illustrated in FIG. 1 are used in a manner similar to water skis, the vehicles being reduced considerably in size.

FEGURE 13 is a cross-sectional view of one of the vehicle illustrated in FIG. 12 taken on lines 13-13 thereof.

FIGURE 14 is a sectional view of one of the vehicles illustrated in FIG. 12 taken on lines 14-14.

FIGURE 15 is a sectional view of one of the vehicles illustrated in FIG. 12 taken on lines 15-15.

Referring to the drawings in more detail, FIG. 1 illustrates the marine vehicle constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention and indicated generally by the number 2. As shown the marine vehicle is substantially tear-dropped in configuration having a rounded rear end portion 4 and a substantially pointed front end portion 6. At the front end 6 of the vehicle 2 there is provided means 8 later described to which a 3,145,400 Patented Aug. 25, 1964 tow line 10 is secured. The other end of the tow line is fixed to the rear portion of a boat whereby the vehicle 2 may be drawn along the surface of the water carrying a rider and providing aquatic sport.

Shown in FIG. 2 is a side elevation of the vehicle 2 and illustrating the general configuration of the portion forming the underside 12 of the vehicle 2 as curved and has a fin 14 projecting downwardly therefrom. The fin 14 extends along the longitudinal center line of the vehicle 2, from the rearward end thereof to a point substantially midway between the rearward end and the forward end of the vehicle.

The vehicle in its preferred embodiment is constructed from a horizontally disposed main body portion of an expanded cellular polyurethene plastic having a coating applied thereto. As shown in FIG. 3, the expanded polyurethene foam 16 has been molded to assume a generally saucer-shaped cross-sectional configuration. The fin 14 as shown is formed integrally with the cellular polyurethene core 16. Subsequent to the molding of the core 16 a coating 18 of a synthetic resinous material is applied to all the surfaces thereof. For additional strength strands of Fiberglass may be incorporated in the coating, and studs 19 may be equally spaced throughout. The body portion of the vehicle 2 is of uniform thickness and has a concave upper surface and a convex lower surface, the body portion being symmetrical on each side of a fore and aft extending longitudinally center line.

To provide a connection for a tow line to the vehicle 7 2, a groove 20 is provided in the sides of the core 16 adjacent the pointed front end portion 6. Anchored in the groove 20 is a length of nylon rope 22. The body portion of the vehicle 2 is provided with a cut-out portion adjacent the forward end and a part of the rope 22 bridges this cut-out portion to form a loop for attachment thereto of a tow line 10. Although it is specified that the means 3 for connecting the tow lines of the vehicle is in the form of a nylon rope 22, it is obvious that other suitable strand means such as rigid or semi-rigid plastic rods may be substituted therefor. After the rope 22 has been disposed within the groove 20 the entire vehicle 22 then has applied to the surface thereof the synthetic resin coating 18 whereby the rope 22 is sealed therein and is securely fastened.

In the modified form of the invention shown in FIG. 6, the vehicle 2 is constructed from a plurality of components which when assembled still provide the desired tear drop configuration.

A tear drop shaped frame is first formed by a tubular member 24. A sheet of expanded polyurethane foam 26 is molded to the configuration of a saucer and is disposed within the frame 24. The expanded polyurethane sheet is provided with a peripheral groove 23 in which the tubular frame member 24 resides. A deck plate 30 is placed in overlying relation to the expanded polyurethane core 26 and tubular frame member 24. The deck plate 351 is so formed that when in overlying relation to the expanded core 26 and frame 24, it is in intimate contact therewith over substantially all its area. A hull plate 32 is disposed in underlying relation to the expanded core 26 and frame member 24 and is formed in the same manner as the deck plate 30. As shown in FIG. 7, the hull plate 32 is also in intimate contact with the expanded core 26 and frame member24 over substantially all its area. A separately formed fin 34 is secured to the underside of the vehicle 2 by means of bolts passing through the vehicle and into the fin 34.

The frame 24 and the deck and hull plates 30 and 32 may be formed of plastic or other corrosion resistant materials such as aluminum. If the tubular frame member 24 and the deck and hull plates 3'0 and 52 are formed of a plastic material, they are suitably joined together by means of a resinous adhesive material. If the parts are constructed from aluminum, the hull and deck plates 30 and 32 may be secured to the tubular frame member 24 by means of welding or bolts 36 as shown in FIG. 8.

In the form of the invention shown in FIG. 9, the marine vehicle 2 is also in the configuration of a tear drop as are the vehicles shown and described in FIGS. 1 and 6. In this modification, however, the vehicle 2 is constructed from a pair of sections 38 and 40. The sections may be formed from a rigid plastic material such as polystyrene or preferably it can be formed from a semi-rigid polyethylene. As indicated, the configuration of the vehicle shown in FIG. 9 is generally the same as those previously described having a rounded rear end portion 42 and a substantially pointed front end portion 44.

The section 38 which forms the deck surface of the vehicle 2 has formed thereon an integral flange which depends downwardly from the edges thereof. Also formed integral with the under surface of the section 38 are a plurality of downwardly extending projections 46. The hull section 40 is molded having an integral flange portion extending upwardly from the edges thereof and when in assembled relation with respect to the deck section 38 the flanges cooperatively engage each other. A stabilizing fin 48 is molded integral with the hull section 40 and is provided for the same purpose, that of stability, as the fins in the previously described forms of the invention.

When assembling the deck and hull sections 38 and 40 of the marine vehicle illustrated in FIG. 9, the downwardly depending flange 39 of deck section 38 and the upwardly extending flange 41 from hull section 40 co operatively engage each other and are secured together by means of a suitable adhesive or welding. The integal projections 46 on deck section 38 maintain the sections 38 and 40 in spaced relation. The projections 46 are secured to the hull section 40 by means of a suitable adhesive or welding. Constructed in this manner the marine vehicle is provided with an air space 50 which enhances the buoyant characteristics of the device. The air space 50 may be likened to the expanded cellular polyurethane foam material used in the forms of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 6 and serves the same purpose.

As illustrated, both forms of the marine vehicle as shown in FIGS. 1, 6, and 9 are provided wtih suitable means 8 to which a tow line may be secured for drawing the same across the surface of the Water.

In some instances a more skilled rider may desire a marine vehicle offering more of a challenge than a vehicle such as that illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 10. If such is the case, the invention may be provided in the forms shown in FIGS. 12-15.

In this form of the invention the aquatic vehicles illustrated in FIGS. 1-10 are reduced substantially in size whereby a more skilled rider may place one foot on each and the same are then towed by a boat over the surface of the water. The construction of the vehicles 2 may be the same as any of the constructions shown in FIGS. 1-10,

As illustrated, the general configuration of the invention as shown in FIGS. 12-15 is saucer-shaped as are those previously described. In this arrangement the foot of the operator is placed on each of the two vehicles. It is apparent that some means are necessary to prevent the feet of the rider from sliding or becoming displaced from the surface of the same. In order to retain the feet of the rider on the deck surface of the vehicles 2, a heel chock 52 is formed integrally with the upper section whereby displacement of the foot in a rearward direction is avoided. To prevent sideways displacement of the riders foot a pair of spaced projecting members 54 and 56 are integrally formed and longitudinally spaced from the heel chock 52. In this manner the foot of a person using the device as shown in FIGS. 12-15 is prevented from moving laterally or longitudinally.

While having described the invention in its preferred embodiments, modifications and variations thereof will become apparent to those skilled in the art. However, such variations and modifications are considered to be within the spirt and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A vehicle for towing on the surface of a body of water comprising a horizontally disposed tear-drop shaped body portion having a forward end and a rearward end, said body portion being of uniform thickness and having a concave upper surface and a convex lower surface, said body portion being symmetrical on each side of a longitudinally extending center line, and a fin depending from the lower surface of said body portion and extending from a point contiguous to the rearward end to a point substantially midway between the rearward end of said body portion and the forward end, said body portion being provided with a cut-out portion adjacent the forward end, a means embedded in the portions of the perimeter of said body portion on each side of said cut-out portion and having a part bridging said cut-out portion so as to provide with the edges of said cut-out portion a loop for attachment thereto of a towing line.

2. The structure of claim 1 wherein said body portion comprises an expanded cellular polyurethane plastic and includes an outer coating of an artificial resinous material.

3. The structure of claim 1 further including vertical projections on said upper surface spaced to accommodate the foot of a user.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,559,977 Lundborg July 10, 1951 2,685,696 Oscanyan Aug. 10, 1954 2,762,063 Quinn Sept. 11, 1956 2,826,423 Erickson Mar. 11, 1958 2,958,875 McClain Nov. 8, 1960 2,959,796 Sander Nov. 15, 1960 2,980,927 Waters Apr. 25, 1961 3,027,575 Fortin Apr. 3, 1962 3,045,264 Smith July 24, 1962 3,082,443 Kimura Mar. 26, 1963 FOREIGN PATENTS 753,711 France "a Aug. 12, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559977 *Mar 11, 1949Jul 10, 1951Lundborg Gustav LWater ski
US2685696 *Dec 26, 1951Aug 10, 1954Oscanyan William HWater scooter
US2762063 *Apr 2, 1953Sep 11, 1956Harvie Quinn JackAqua disk
US2826423 *Apr 25, 1955Mar 11, 1958Kalamazoo Sled CompanyCombined coaster and ski
US2959796 *May 17, 1957Nov 15, 1960De Sander EmielSportsman's accessory
US2959875 *Nov 13, 1957Nov 15, 1960Frese Jr Albert CSlip-proof sock lining for shoes
US2980927 *Jul 14, 1959Apr 25, 1961Sr Noble R WatersWater chair
US3027575 *Jun 26, 1957Apr 3, 1962Fortin Plastics IncWater ski
US3045264 *Sep 26, 1960Jul 24, 1962Smith Ronald FWater sleds
US3082443 *Jun 6, 1960Mar 26, 1963Tak KimuraAqua-sled
FR753711A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3543315 *Oct 9, 1967Dec 1, 1970William L HoffmanSoft board fabrication
US3952354 *Oct 23, 1974Apr 27, 1976Turner Richard WSled
US4017927 *Jan 22, 1976Apr 19, 1977Massey David HRing buoy
US5173068 *Oct 22, 1991Dec 22, 1992Dunn Daniel RBody surfing apparatus
US5558551 *Sep 15, 1995Sep 24, 1996Irby; David W.Steerable swimmer towing device
US6431932Dec 13, 2000Aug 13, 2002Arne PedersonWater board, and method of water boarding
US7128628 *Apr 12, 2005Oct 31, 2006Tzong In YehSlider having a direction locating structure
US7628664 *Apr 12, 2005Dec 8, 2009Tzong In YehSlider with foam rails
US7922550 *Oct 26, 2009Apr 12, 2011Tzong In YehSlider with foam rails
US8882553Dec 6, 2012Nov 11, 2014Terrence Michael HanrahanForearm boat
US8991835 *Dec 17, 2012Mar 31, 2015Arc Products, LlcLightweight plastic sleds for emergency transport and hauling of loads
US20110241300 *Mar 17, 2011Oct 6, 2011Thomas SchiolerTransport Device Formed From Plastic Sheet
US20140213127 *Apr 1, 2014Jul 31, 2014Fitness OnboardStand Up Paddleboard
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/65, 273/DIG.400, 273/DIG.200, 273/DIG.700, 273/DIG.800, 280/18
International ClassificationB63B35/81
Cooperative ClassificationY10S273/08, Y10S273/07, Y10S273/04, Y10S273/02, B63B35/81
European ClassificationB63B35/81