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Publication numberUS3148799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1964
Filing dateAug 20, 1962
Priority dateAug 20, 1962
Publication numberUS 3148799 A, US 3148799A, US-A-3148799, US3148799 A, US3148799A
InventorsMeroney Albert H
Original AssigneeMeroney Albert H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Disposable adjustable receptacle liner for wet refuse
US 3148799 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 15, 1964 A. H. MERONEY DISPOSABLE ADJUSTABLE RECEPTACLE LINER FOR WET REFUSE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 20, 1962 m W 4% WWW M0 Sept. 15, 1964 A. H. MERONEY DISPOSABLE ADJUSTABLE RECEPTACLE LINER FOR WET REFUSE Filed Aug. 20, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR ALBERT H. MERONEY United States Patent 3,1485% DISPOSABILE ADJUSTABLE RECEPTACLE LINER FGR WET REFUSE Albert H. Mereney, 5623 S. Washington St., Hinsdale, Ill. Filed Aug. 20, 1962, Ser. No. 217,925 Claims. (EH. 220-53) The present invention relates to certain new and useful improvements in containers. More particularly, it relates to an improved container liner which embodies novel features.

Cleaning and deodorizing receptacles for temporary storage of wet materials which are subject to intense bacterial action, such as kitchen garbage, soiled diapers, laboratory refuse, etc., are a continuous, unpleasant repetition for the housewife, the hospital attendant, and the laboratory technician. Numerous permanent receptacle designs disclosed by earlier inventors have provided temporary refuse and wet-material storage receptacles which are relativeiy easier to clean and can be used repeatedly. Nonetheless, these reusable waste receptacles require time-consuming cleaning, which often is a laborious, un pleasant chore, and despite frequent cleaning such receptacles often give rise to unpleasant, offensive bacterial odors. Still other earlier inventors have disclosed temporary wet-refuse receptacle designs which provide a disposable liner. Such a disposable liner that is water resistant will save the permanent receptacle interior from contact with the wet bacteria-carrying refuse material and, accordingly, provide a sanitary, odor-free, temporary storage of wet waste materials. A means for supporting the liner within the permanent receptacle is provided, most often by cooperative interlocking of structures pro.- vided on the upper interior surfaces of the permanent receptacle and the upper portion of the replaceable liner. One disadvantage heretofore of these replaceable liner receptacles is the lack of availability of the liners in the market place and stores, and their considerable cost. Yet another problem with these earlier refuse receptacle liners is the fact that they must be prepared in a variety of sizes to fit the different-sized receptacles, which further increases the costs and the problems of distribution to the users.

It is often observed, particularly in family kitchens, that paper shopping bags or plain plastic bags are utilized as wet-refuse receptacle liners. The paper shopping bags are normally not moisture-resistant, which results in tearing of the bags and spilling of the refuse. The plastic or polymer bags are moisture-proof but lack any stiffness or shape. Consequently, without being supported by folding over the top of the receptacle rim, or fastened upon and held in an upright position by other means, the plastic bags used as receptacle liners collapse and spill the contents.

There remains a need for a moisture-proof, replaceable receptacle liner adaptable to a wide number of receptacle sizes and designs. There is further need for a receptacle liner requiring no special means on the receptacle for attachment of the liner thereto, the liner being provided un'th means for insuring that it will remain in an upright position.

One object, therefore, of my invention is to provide an improved replaceable receptacle liner for temporary storage of moisture-bearing materials.

Another object of my invention is to provide a waste receptacle liner adaptable to a wide range of receptacle sizes.

Another object of my invention is to provide a disposable waste receptacle liner having means for attachment to receptacles having a range of sizes and shapes without requiring special fittings or fasteners.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a wet-proof disposable, inexpensive receptacle liner equipped with means for keeping it in an upright position to avoid spilling the contents.

These and other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following specification and claims, and the accompanying illustrations wherein:

FIGURE 1 illustrates a preferred embodiment of my invention shown in a typical application.

FIGURE 2 illustrates another view of the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIGURE 1, adapted for use with a covered container.

FIGURE 3 is a partially cut-away view of the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIGURES 1 and 2.

FIGURE 4 illustrates another preferred embodiment of my invention.

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary view of my invention showing a preferred means of fastening my novel replaceable liner to a receptacle.

FIGURE 6 is a fragmentary view of my invention showing a second preferred means of fastening my novel replaceable liner to a receptacle.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary view of a variation on the embodiments of my invention shown in FIGURES 1, 2, 3 and 4.

FIGURE 8 is another fragmentary view of the variation on my invention illustrated in FIGURE 7.

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary view of the variation of the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIGURES 1, 2, and 3.

Referring now to the drawings, FIGURE '1 illustrates a preferred embodiment of my invention shown adapted for use in a conventional waste container or receptacle 19 having sides 12, an open upper end or aperture 14 and a rim or lipid. A moisture-proof liner 18, which is essentialy a sack or bag, being an elongated sleeve or envelope closed at one end and open at the other end, is positioned within the receptacle 10 with the closed end lowermost and the upper open end or bag aperture 14 positioned within and substantially symmetrical with the receptacle rim 16. The moisture-proof liner may conveniently be made of polyethylene, Mylar, or polystyrene sheets having a thickness between one-half mil to two mils. The composition of the liner material and its thickness may be varied depending upon the intended application. For instance, a liner intended for a laboratory waste receptacle which might be exposed to corrosive substances or material dangerous to persons coming into contact with it would properly be made of two or three mil thick Mylar; on the other hand, a waste receptacle liner intended for use in a household kitchen might conveniently be made from one and one-half to two mil thick polyethylene.

FIGURE 2 shows the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIGURE 1 and more fully in FIGURE 3, adapted for use in a pedal-operated cover waste receptacle, which is often found in laboratories, medical clinics, and in some homes. A receptacle 2% having side walls 22 and an upper open aperture 24, about the periphery of which is a rim 26, is provided with a hinged lid or cover 28. The cover 28 is actuated by mechanical means, not shown in the drawings, which are connected to a foot pedal 30. The receptacle may also be provided with a removable inner metal container, which is not shown in the drawings. My invention, as will appear from the description and drawings, is well adapted for use With an open, coverless receptacle, or with receptacles having covers, and even those mechanically actuated.

The liner 18, which may be seen best in FIGURE 3, is an elongated envelope or bag 32 closed at a first or the bottom end 34 and open at the second or upper end 36.

The liner may be made from one piece of material by folding and sealing along the side and bottom, as illustrated in FIGURE 3. Polyethylene, Mylar and other polymer sheets are also supplied from the producers in the form of continuous tubes of various diameters. Such tubes are useful for making the novel liner sleeves of my invention, which may be conveniently formed by sealing one end of a section of thin-walled polymer tubing.

The open end 36 of the liner sleeve 32 is provided with two panels or tabs 38 and 49. The panels, made of stiffened paper or plastic, are attached by adhesive or heat sealing to the liner sleeve 32. The panels attached to the interior surface of the sleeve extend above the liner sleeve aperture 36, and are evenly spaced from one another about the periphery of the aperture 36. Each panel 38 and 40 extends approximately one-quarter of the circumference of the sleeve aperture. A plurality of narrower panels or tabs may be substituted for the two rather wide tabs 38 and 40 shown in the illustrations. The panels 38 and 40 are folded outwardly over the edge of the liner aperture 36. This construction is most readily understood by reference to the illustrations. The panels 38 and 40, folded as indicated above, are conveniently placed over the rim 16 in FIGURE 1 or 26 in FIGURE 2 of a receptacle and support the liner sleeve 32 in an upright position within the interior of the receptacle.

In the embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG- URES 1 through 3, the panels 38 and iii are shown as being held in proper spaced relationship to one another by stiffened paper or plastic spacer strips 42 and 44 at tached by adhesive to the interior of the liner sleeve just below the aperture 36 in those portions of the perimeter of the aperture between the panels 38 and 40. Pleated folds 46 and 48 have been made at right angles to the aperture edge and serve to adjust the effective diameter of the aperture 36.

The stiffened panels 38 and 4% and the pleated spacer strips 42 and 44 altogether, when cemented to the interior surface of the liner sleeve 32, form a. collar about the aperture 36 which supports the liner sleeve and adjusts the effective diameter of the sleeve to accommodate receptacles of varying shape and size.

FIGURE 3 illustrates one method of closing any liner bag when it contains refuse or moisture-laden materials. A drawstring 50 is threaded through retaining loops 52 and 54 attached to the exterior of the liner sleeve 32 a spaced distance below the collar about the sleeve aperture 36.

Another preferred embodiment of my invention is illustrated in FIGURE 4 wherein a liner sleeve 60 is prepared from a section of plastic tubing. The lower end 62 of the liner sleeve 6t is sealed, the upper or second end 64 is open and cut at right angles to the tube section to form an aperture, indicated at 66. Panels 68 and 70 are attached to the interior surface of the liner sleeve 60 in spaced relationship and positioned so that approximately one-half of each of the panels extends beyond the edge of the aperture 66.

The embodiment of my invention illustrated in FIG- URES 4, and 6 is adapted to adjust the effective diameter of the linersleeve 60 by the fact that the material from which the sleeve is formed is relatively flexible and pliable. The panels 63 and 7% may be mounted to the rim of the receptacle, such as shown in the embodiments illustrated in FIGURES 1 through 3. FIGURE 5 illustrates the conventional mounting wherein a fragment of a receptacle 72 is shown with a rim 74. The panel '70 with a portion of the liner sleeve 60 cemented thereto is placed over the rim 74. In order to make the liner more secure when inserted in a receptacle and material or refuse of substantial weight is accumulated in the liner, a pressure-sensitive adhesive strip 76 is provided. The adhesive strip is protected by a readily removable covering film '78. By removing the protective film 73 from 4 the pressure-sensitive adhesive strip 76 and attaching the adhesive strip 76 to the exterior of the receptacle by application of pressure on the panels 68 and 7t), a much increased strength may be imparted to the panels 68 and 7%) which hold the liner sleeve 60 about the rim of the receptacle. By such an arrangement as shown on FIG- URE 5, a substantial weight of refuse or moisture-laden objects may be dropped with considerable force into the liner within a receptacle without risk of pulling the supporting panels 68 and off the rim of the receptacle.

FIGURE 6 illustrates an alternative method of mounting the disposable liner within a receptacle. A portion of liner sleeve 86 is shown attached as described above to a panel 88 which is folded over the edge of the liner sleeve aperture 99. A pressure-sensitive adhesive strip 92 is attached to the exterior surface of the panel 88. I have found that applying the pressure-sensitive adhesive strip $2 on the panel to the interior surface of a receptacle, such as shown in FIGURE 6 at 94, with the support panel or tab in an unfolded configuration, will adequately support the liner within the interior of the receptacle with little or no risk that the liner will be pulled down to the lowermost portion of the receptacle by the weight of the contents placed within the liner.

FIGURES 7 and 8 illustrate an alternative means for sealing liners after they have been used and contain refuse or other moisture-laden materials which must be temporarily transported or which must be discarded. A liner sleeve 109 is attached to a panel 102 to which a pressure-sensitive adhesive strip 1G4 has been applied. The sealed configuration is shown best in FIGURE 8 where two panels 102a and 10% are shown juxtaposed and the pressure-sensitive adhesive strip 104a joins the two panels, closing the aperture to the liner sleeve 100. Sealing of my liner after it has been used may be conveniently and securely accomplished by means of the pressure-sensitive adhesive strip adapted to the interior surface of the collar by the aperture of the liner.

The foregoing specification and drawings are merely illustrative of preferred embodiments of my invention, the scope of which is described in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A replaceable liner for receptacles comprising an elongated, water-resistant sleeve having a single aperture at a first end and being closed at the second end, an annular, expansible collar secured to the sleeve about the aperture, and separate support means secured to the aperture, whereby the liner may be adjusted by the expansible collar to the size of a receptacle, and may be supported within the receptacle by attachment of the support means to the receptacle.

2. A replaceable liner for receptacles comprising an elongated, water-resistant sleeve having a single aperture at a first end, a stiff, annular collar, the collar being secured to the sleeve about the aperture, folding support means attached to and extending from the collar, and a plurality of expandable pleated folds in the collar in spacedrelationship to the support means, whereby the diameter of the collar and attached sleeve aperture may be adjusted to the dimensions of a receptacle; and the sleeve portion of the liner may be supported within the interior of the receptacle by the collar and the support means.

3. A replaceable liner for receptacles comprising an elongated, relatively flexible sack having a single aperture at a first end thereof, a relatively stiff, annular collar, the'collar being secured to the sack about the aperture, the aperture opening through the collar, foldable tabs attached to and extending from the collar, and a plurality of pleated folds in the collar in spaced relationship with the tabs whereby the diameter of the collar and aperture of the sack may be adjusted to various size receptacles by action of the pleated folds in the collar, and the liner may be suspended from the opening in a re ceptacle by means of the foldable tabs.

4. A removable liner for receptacles wherein the receptacles have an interior surface, a lip, and an exterior surface, comprising a moisture-resistant, relatively flexible sleeve, the sleeve being closed at a first and lowermost end, and open to form an aperture at the second and uppermost end, a plurality of support panels, the panels being attached to the sleeve in spaced relationship with one another and being attached to extend beyond the sleeve, and means associated with the panels adapted for temporarily afiixing the liner in an upright position in 10 the interior of the receptacle by interaction With the lip and exterior surfaces of the receptacle.

5. The liner of claim 4 wherein the means associated References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Miller Nov. Werdin May Rosenthal Dec. Faltin Nov. Benton Feb.

With the panels for supporting the liner is a pressure-sensitive adhesive.

Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/495.11, 383/120, 206/524.5, D34/9, 220/908.1
International ClassificationB65F1/04, B65F1/16, B65F1/06, B65F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65F1/0006, B65F1/06, B65F1/163
European ClassificationB65F1/06, B65F1/16D1, B65F1/00A