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Publication numberUS3148840 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1964
Filing dateFeb 26, 1962
Priority dateFeb 26, 1962
Publication numberUS 3148840 A, US 3148840A, US-A-3148840, US3148840 A, US3148840A
InventorsBehnke George W
Original AssigneeSimplicity Eng Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Crusher apparatus
US 3148840 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 15, 1964 w. BEHNKE CRUSHER APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 26, 1962 INVENTOR. George W. Be/mke BY a/WM ffi m ATTORNEYS G. W. BEHNKE Sept. 15, 1964 CRUSHER APPARATUS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 26, 1962 m T m m George 14 Be/znke Sept. 15, 1964 w BEHNKE 3,148,840

QRUSHER APPARATUS Filed Feb. 26, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 55/ 6 INVENTOR. j

(v 607 78 W flehnke Y f IVWKM HTTORNE Y6 United States Patent 3,148,340 CRUSIER APPARATUS George W. Belmke, Durand, Mich, assignor to Simplicity Engineering Company, Durand, Mich, a corporation of Michigan Filed Feb. 26, 1962, Ser. No. 175,727 7 Claims. ((11. 241-275) This invention relates to crushers of the impact type for crushing metal and asbestos bearing rock, ore, coal, gravel, lightweight aggregates, and other fragmentary materials in which the material to be crushed is flung outwardly, by centrifugal force, against a plurality of crushing bars for crushing it to the desired size, and more particularly to a crushing mechanism including crushing bar tips which can be readily adjusted to suecessively present a plurality of unworn face areas to the material as it is flung from the impeller of the crusher mechanism.

A further object of the invention is to design a crushing mechanism including adjustable, replaceable crusher bar tips disposed in the path of the outwardly flung material, which can be successively adjusted to present a practically unworn area or impact surface to the work when the area presently in use becomes excessively worn, and which can be easily and quickly removed and replaced when no further adjustment is possible and the entire tip is worn to the point which requires replacement.

A still further object is to provide a crusher mechanism including crushing bars having a plurality of impact tips telescopically mounted thereon and capable of being manually removed,- adjusted, and replaced to present a fresh working surface area to the work each time the work area of the tip face presently in use becomes excessively worn.

Crushing impact bars of the type herein referred to are usually relatively heavy and are made up of expensive metal, as the nature of the material to be crushed is such that said bars are subjected to Very severe abrasive wear; and I have, therefore, designed an adjustable tip, the head of which is formed of high cost manganese plate, which can be mounted on bars of relatively inexpensive metal, thus securing a substantial saving in cost, and further providing for more uniform wear, inasmuch as certain predetermined areas of the heads of the tips are disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence with relation to the impeller so but a limited area of each tip is subjected to wear, while the remaining area of the bar or tip is not affected, until adjusted to working position.

Another object is to design a crushing bar formed with a forked end section on which removable tips are telescopically mounted, said tips being progressively removable and rotatable through a predetermined degree of rotation and again replaced each time the impact area in use becomes excessively worn, so that a new impact face area is presented to the work after each adjustment.

Still a further object is to provide a baffle means associated with the crushing bars for deflecting some of the crushed material into the circular shelf or space between the crushing bars, so that it builds up and fills the shelf, to the end that the crushed material packs in the shelf and forms a wall against which some of the material is deflected or flung to provide a material against material crushing action; minimizing wear on the crushing bars, baflies, and adjacent metal surfaces, and reducing maintenance, replacement, and overall wear of the various parts.

A further object still is to provide an impeller provided with a plurality of wear pins so constructed and arranged asto form the lip and tip of the impeller buckets by means of which the material to be crushed is flung, and which pins can be adjusted end for end when worn to provide a much longer life than wear pins presently 111 use.

Still a further object is to design a high capacity crusher requiring a minimum of maintenance, which is compact in size, does not vibrate and which produces a maximum of cubical product.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, the invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description and the annexed drawings settingforth in detail, certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principal of the invention may be employed.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a part-sectional, side elevational view of my improved crusher mechanism, embodying the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view thereof taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1, with the feed hopper, etc. omitted.

FIG. 3 is a detail perspective view of one of the crushing bar tip supports.

FIG. 4 is an end elevational view thereof.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of one of the detachable crushing bar tips.

PEG. 6 is an end elevational view thereof.

FIG. 7 is an end elevational view showing the tips mounted in position on a crushing bar, the broken lines illustrating the removal of one of the tips, and the arrow the rotation thereof.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the impeller assembly.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of one of the baifle deflectors.

FIG. 10 is a part sectional view of one of the wear pins.

FIG. 11 is an end elevational View thereof.

Referring now more specifically to FiGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings wherein is shown a crusher bowl C, comprising upper and lower sections 10 and 11 respectively, the lower section 11 being of smaller diameter than the upper section; and a bottom plate member 12 is welded to the end of the lower section 11 and has an enlarged, centrally disposed discharge opening 13 through which the crushed material flows. The outer edge 14 of the plate extends beyond the cylindrical section 11 and provides a flange to facilitate anchoring the crusher in position.

The upper end of the lower section 11 projects into the upper bowl section 10 as at 15, and a flat, circular plate 16 is welded to the lower end of the section 10 and to the section 11 to form a continuous shelf or pocket P therearound. Gussets 17 are welded to the members 11 and 16 and serve to reinforce the structure described.

A circular plate 18 is welded to the upper rim of bowl section 10 and forms a top closure for the shelf or pocket P, and a circular flange 19 is Welded to the inner edge of said plate for reinforcing purposes. A cover plate 2i) overlies the inner edge of the plate 18 as shown, and a depending rim band 21 is provided on the lower face thereof with a hopper H mounted on said cover plate, a bottom plate 22 forms a part of said hopper, and bears on the cover plate 20. A centrally disposed, cylindrical feed spout 23 projects into the bowl 10, and gussets 24 are provided in the hopper H for reinforcing purposes.

The upper end of hopper H is open, and the material M, to be crushed, is fed thereinto by means of a conveyor (not shown) or in any other desired manner. A wear plate 25 is welded to the inner face of the cover 20, and

another deflector wear plate 26 is welded to the projecting 3. section of the lower bowl, and is formed with a laterally projecting flange 27 for deflecting the crushed material through the discharge opening 13.

A structural support S is provided in the lower bowl section 11 and comprises upwardly inclined, radiating bars 28 welded to the bowl and to a bearing support 2.9 in which a bearing R is mounted. Shield plates 39 are welded to the upper edges of the bars 28, with an upstanding, circular rim 31 welded to these plates, and for a purpose to be presently described.

Upwardly pitched brace bars 32 are Welded to the plate and hopper H respectively and bolts 33 secure the bars and plate 20 together as a unit, the upper ends of the brace bars being secured to an upper bearing support 34 in which a bearing R is mounted, with a sheave 35 provided on a shaft 35 and connected to a suitable source of power (not shown).

The vertically disposed shaft 36 is jourualled in the bearings R and R and a concentrically arranged, stationary sleeve 37 surrounds said shaft and is provided with an end plate 33 on the lower end thereof. A rim 38a is provided on the plate 33, the incoming material falling on the plate and overflowing onto the slinger E, and for a purpose to be presently described.

Laterally projecting flanges 39 39 are provided on the sleeve 37, and a stay 49 is secured to the one flange and to the brace 32 as shown, a similar horizontal stay 41 being secured to the opposite flange and to one of the gussets 24 provided in the hopper H, these stays serving to suspend and center the sleeve 37 around the shaft 36, and openings 3% are provided in the flanges to permit vertical adjustment of said sleeve, all as shown and described in Patent No. 2,992,783, granted July 18, 1961, Crusher Apparatus and Method of Crushing Aggregates.

The impeller assembly E is rigidly mounted on the shaft 36 in the position shown, and is driven from the sheave 35, said impeller comprising a lower slinger plate 42 having wear plate sections 43 secured to the face thereof. A wear band or rim 44 is secured to the outer edge of plate 42 and telescopically accommodates the rim 31 as shown.

A top plate 45 forms the top of the impeller assembly, see FIG. 8 of the drawings, and wear plate sections 46 are provided on the lower face thereof, vertical members L, angular in cross section being welded to the plates 42 and 45. Vertically disposed wear pins 47 and 48 are interposed between said plates 42 and 4-5, the lower end of each pin being seated in openings t? provided in the plate sections 42 and 43, while the upper end of each pin is mounted in an opening 56 provided in the top plates 45 and 46.

The member L and wear pins 47 and 48 respectively, which are interposed between the plates 42 and 45, form buckets which fling the material, by centrifugal force, as the impeller is driven, said wear pins being arranged in certain predetermined relation or pattern, with the outer pins 47 positioned to form the lip of the bucket, and the inner pins 48 form the inner tip end of said buckets, and I wish to point out that while these pins are disposed in close proximity to the edges of the member L, they are not secured thereto, and when Worn as shown in broken lines in FIG. 8 of the drawings, can be changed end for end to present an unworn surface to the work.

Lock plates or straps 51 are secured to upper face of plate 45 by means of bolts 52, said plate being formed with transversely disposed slotted passages 53 through which the bolts project, and it will be obvious that by loosening the bolts 52, these plates can be shifted transversely, to uncover the openings 56 and upper ends of the wear pins, so that they can be readily removed for repair, adjustment and/ or replacement.

A plurality of crushing bar tip supports B are mounted on raised ribs 54 provided in the shelf or pocket P and are secured in position in any approved manner, each bar being disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence with relation to the impeller (see FIG. 2 of the drawings),

the free end of each bar being bifurcated (see FIG. 3 of the drawings), to form forked projections 55-55. Pads 56-56 are welded to the opposite side walls of each projection, and each fork telescopically accommodates a crusher bar tip which slides thereover.

Each crushing tip comprises a sleeve section 57 which slides over the free end of each tip support 55, said sleeve terminating in an enlarged tip head 58 disposed in the path of travel of the material as it is flung from the impeller buckets.

Due to the angle of incidence at which the crushing bars are set, the working area against which the material is flung is approximately one quarter the area of the tip head. This area is subjected to severe wear while the remainder of the head area remains unworn, but when this working area becomes sufiiciently worn, the operator pulls the crusher tip free of its mounting 55 (see broken lines in FIG. 7), rotates it through an angle of ninety degrees as indicated by the arrows onFIG. 7, and again mounts the tip in position, thus presenting a fresh head area to the work. If there is more wear on one head of each pair, these tips can be quickly interchanged. Additional adjustments are made when found necessary until the tip heads are completely worn and require repiacement, see broken linnes in FIG. 5 of the drawings.

To maintain a material against material crushing action, it is advantageous that the section of the bowl shelf opposite the point or trajectory at which the material is flung, be at all times packed full of the crushed material M; and I, therefore, provide a plurality of baffle members 59 which are welded to the upper wall 18 of the pocket or shelf, these baffles being formed with spaced laterally projecting wings 641'; and in practice, the material flung by the impeller against the crushing tips builds up at a sharper angle of repose in the pocket or shelf than would be the case if the baifle 59 were omitted, thus covering substantially the entire inner face of the pocket and eliminating abrasive wear.

The wear pins 47 and 48 are also of special design and wear for a relatively long time, each pin comprising an abrasive resistant core a with a sleeve 12 encasing said core and providing structural strength. Sleeve b can be formed of seamless steel tubing having a hard ness in the range 30-40 Rockwell, and provides a high structural strength but relatively limited hardness and wear resistance.

The center section or core a of each pin is formed of hardened tool steel, alloy, alumina, ceramic, or other hard materiaL'this center section being quite brittle and has relatively little structural strength, but is highly abrasive resistant, and this combination produces a wear pin which will wear for a long period of time.

Vertically disposed, spaced apart bars 61 are Welded to the outer surface of the bowl C and to the gusset 17 and are provided with openings 62 to accommodate a bolt or the like (not shown), to facilitate handling of the crusher.

In practice, the material M fed to hopper H, flows through the feed spout 23 onto the plate 38, thence overflowing onto the driven slinger plate 42 where it is caught by the impeller buckets L and flung outwardly against the head areas of the tip members T; at the onset some of the flung and crushed material builds up and packs in the shelf P, and the remaining crushed material flows down through opening 13 into a bin, car or other receptacle (not shown).

From the foregoing description, it will be obvious that I have perfected a very simple, practical and relatively inexpensive crusher mechanism for crushing ores, rock and friable materialsof all kinds, which can be readily adjusted to compensatefor wear and which requires a minimum of maintenance and replacement.

What i claim is:

l. A crusher mechanism comprising; a crusher bowl formed with a continuous shelf around the inner perimeter thereof; a driven impeller member journaled in said bowl and into which the material to be crushed is fed; a plurality of impact bars mounted in said shelf in circumferentially spaced apart relation, and disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence relative to said impeller; adjustable, removable tips having an enlarged head, telescopically mounted on the exposed ends of the said impact bars, each tip being so disposed that the flung material strikes a limited face area of said head; said tip being adjustable through a predetermined angle to present an unworn face area when the impact surface presented to the work becomes worn.

2. A crusher mechanism comprising; a bowl formed with a continuous shelf around the inner perimeter thereof; a driven impeller member journaled in said bowl and into which the material to be crushed is fed; a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart impact bars mounted in said shelf, the inner exposed end of each bar being bifurcated; said bars being disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence relative to said impeller; adjustable, removable tips mounted on said bifurcated end, each tip being adjustable to predetermined position to expose a fresh face area when the area in use becomes Worn.

3. A crusher mechanism comprising; a bowl formed with a continuous shelf around the inner perimeter thereof; a driven impeller journaled in said bowl; impact bars mounted in said shelf in circumferentially spaced apart relation and disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence relative to said impeller; and adjustable, removable tips telescopically mounted on the exposed ends of the impact bars; circumferentially spaced buckets on said impeller and vertically disposed wear bars mounted in the impeller and spaced to protect the lip and inner end respectively of said buckets.

4. A combination defined in claim 3 in which the wear trally disposed impeller member journaled in said bowl; I

a material hopper in communication with said impeller for feeding material to be crushed thereto; impact bars mounted in said bowl in circumferentially spaced apart relation and disposed at a predetermined angle of incidence relative to said impeller; a tip member telescopically mounted on the inner end of each bar; said tip being adjustable through an predetermined angle to present an unworn face area of the tip whenrthe face area in use becomes worn, and a bafile member mounted in said bowl intermediate each pair of bars.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS I 1,598,702 Bell et al. Sept. 7, 1926 2,609,993 Planiol Sept. 9, 1952 2,635,817 Long Apr. 21, 1953 2,712,417 Jensen July 5, 1955 2,992,783 Wirth et al. July 18, 1961 2,992,784 Behnke et al. July 18, 1961 3,015,391 Sharples -1 Jan. 2, 1962 3,044,720 Bridgewater July 17, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1598702 *Jan 8, 1924Sep 7, 1926Int Comb Eng CorpPulverizing apparatus
US2609993 *Feb 6, 1947Sep 9, 1952Plaroc IncImpact pulverizing mill, including both cooling and vacuum means
US2635817 *Aug 21, 1950Apr 21, 1953Long Leo HImpact breaker bar mechanism
US2712417 *Apr 4, 1952Jul 5, 1955Jensen Sanning CRotary striking hammer with tip-attached wear member
US2992783 *Feb 3, 1959Jul 18, 1961Simplicity Eng CoCrusher apparatus and methods of crushing aggregates
US2992784 *Feb 24, 1959Jul 18, 1961Simplicity Eng CoBowl liners for crushers
US3015391 *Feb 24, 1960Jan 2, 1962Sharples CorpClassification process and apparatus
US3044720 *Sep 30, 1960Jul 17, 1962Bridgewater Thomas EImpact crushing apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3346203 *Jul 12, 1965Oct 10, 1967Bath Iron Works CorpImpeller for centrifugal pulverizer
US3873047 *Mar 22, 1973Mar 25, 1975Louis W JohnsonImpact crusher
US4389022 *Jun 4, 1981Jun 21, 1983Burk John HRock crusher breaker blocks and adjustment apparatus
US4390136 *Jul 17, 1981Jun 28, 1983Burk John HReplacement wear pins and replaceable impeller assembly for impact crusher
US4575014 *Jun 27, 1984Mar 11, 1986Rexnord Inc.Vertical shaft impact crusher rings
US4577806 *Nov 18, 1983Mar 25, 1986Acrowood CorporationImpeller assembly for an impact crusher
US4659026 *Jan 31, 1986Apr 21, 1987Rexnord Inc.Guard rings for vertical shaft impact crusher
US4768724 *Mar 25, 1986Sep 6, 1988Guy EhmannBreaker plate for rock crusher
US4844364 *Jun 6, 1988Jul 4, 1989Rossouw Pieter JRotary impact crusher
US4844365 *Jun 6, 1988Jul 4, 1989Rossouw Pieter JRotary impact crusher
USRE29798 *Mar 16, 1977Oct 10, 1978El-Jay, Inc.Impact crusher
EP0135287A2 *Jul 13, 1984Mar 27, 1985Acrowood CorporationImpact crusher
EP0166672A2 *Jun 20, 1985Jan 2, 1986Rexnord Inc.Vertical shaft impact crusher rings
EP0166673A2 *Jun 20, 1985Jan 2, 1986Nordberg Inc.Guard rings for vertical shaft impact crusher
EP1448305A1 *Oct 30, 2002Aug 25, 2004Crushing and Mining Equipment Pty., Ltd.An impactor anvil
Classifications
U.S. Classification241/275
International ClassificationB02C13/00, B02C13/18
Cooperative ClassificationB02C13/1842, B02C2013/1864
European ClassificationB02C13/18B4D