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Publication numberUS3148843 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1964
Filing dateOct 9, 1959
Priority dateOct 9, 1959
Publication numberUS 3148843 A, US 3148843A, US-A-3148843, US3148843 A, US3148843A
InventorsJohn J Bradley, William H Jaques, Thomas M Turner
Original AssigneeFmc Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Breaker bar for web rewinding machine
US 3148843 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1964 T/M. TURNER ETAL BREAKER BAR FOR WEB REWINDING 'IMACHINE 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 9, 1959 INVENTORS THOMAS M. TURNER WILLIAM H. JAQUES JOHN J. BRADLEY BY M H m-HFMHI ATTO RNEY 1'. M. TURNER ETAL BREAKER BAR FOR WEB REWINDING MACHINE Filed Oct. 9, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTO RN EY Sept. 15, 1964 T. M. TURNER ETAL BREAKER BAR FOR WEB REWINDING MACHINE Filed on. 9, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 i I F] 1: I m 8% H P 1; o 6) (X) l f moui ir'lfiia WlLLIAM H. JAQUES JOHN J. BRADLEY BY Qpm /W ATTORNEY p 15, 1954 1'. M. TURNER ETAL 3,148,843

BREAKER BAR FOR was REWINDING MACHINE Filed Oct. 9, 1959 4 Sheets-Sheet.4

mvlu'rons THOMAS M. TURNER WILLIAM H. UES

JOHN J. BR EY A'I'TO RN EY United States Patent 3,148,843 BREAKER BAR FOR WEB REWINDIN MACE Thomas M. Turner and William H. Jaques, Cincinnati, and John J. Bradley, Terrace Park, Ohio, assignors, by mesne assignments, to FMC Corporation, San Jose, Calif., a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 9, 1959, Ser. No. 845,415 '1 Claim. (Cl. 24256) This invention pertains to machines for winding toilet tissue, paper toweling, or like materials into marketable size rolls. More particularly, the invention is directed to a novel web breaking mechanism for use in such a machine.

In the preparation of toilet tissue, paper toweling and like materials for market, a large, mill size parent roll of sheet. material is placed on a rewinding machine. The web is unwound from the parent roll and as it passes through the machine it is perforated transversely at regular intervals to divide it into individual sheets, slit longitudinally into marketable roll size widths, and then rewound into rolls of marketable diameter. When a roll being wound reaches marketable diameter the web must be broken or severed transversely and a new roll started.

It is an object of this invention to provide a novel mechanism for breaking the web when the roll being wound reaches marketable diameter.

Another object of the invention is to provide a web breaking mechanism which produces a sharp straight break across the full width of the web.

Another object of the invention is to provide a web breaking mechanism capable of producing a straight clean break across the web while the web is moving at high velocity.

These and other objects and advantages of the instant invention will become apparent from the following detailed description and the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a section through a rewinding machine incorporating the breaker arm assembly of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary section on the same plane as FIG. 1 and illustrates the breaker arm assembly in an alternative position.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary section taken generally on line 33 of FIG. 2 and illustrates the mounting structure of the breaker arm.

FIGS. 4-7 are fragmentary sections similar to FIG. 2 and illustrate the breaker arm assembly in various phases of its cycle of operation.

In the rewinding machine 16 illustrated in FIG. 1, cores 12 mounted on suitable rollers or mandrels 14 are introduced to the machine at station A. The mandrels 14 are gripped between suitable spindles 16 provided at spaced points along two parallel endless chains located adjacent the opposite sides of the machine, one of said chains being shown at 18. The cores are carried by the endless chains past a core cutting station B, at which station the cores 12 are cut into individual roll size lengths by cutters 20. The cores 12 next pass an adhesive applying station C where adhesive is applied to the cores 12 by a roller or rollers 22. The cores then progress to the winding station D. After the rolls are wound onto the cores 12 in the manner described hereinbelow, the finished rolls 24 are discharged from the machine at E.

The paper web W enters from a mill or parent roll (not shown) through a perforating mechanism P which perforates the paper web W along evenly spaced transverse lines. The web W then passes through a longitudinal splitting mechanism G which slits the web W longitudinally into strips of marketable width. When a roll 24a being wound on a core 12a at the winding station D reaches marketable diameter the breaker arm assembly H of the present invention is actuated to break the web W in the manner illustrated in FIG. 2, and a new roll is started on the next succeeding core 12b in a manner described hereinbelow.

The driving mechanism for rotating the rolls 24 as they are being wound comprises a plurality of endless belts 30 (FIGS. 2 and 4) each of which frictionally engages the periphery of one of the rolls 2411 being wound and rotates it at the same peripheral velocity as the linear velocity of the web W. The belts 30 are trained around suitable drums 32 and 34. The shaft 36 of the upper drum 32 is rotatably mounted in suitable bearings (not shown) carried by horizontal slide blocks one of which is shown at 38. Each slide block 38 is mounted in a suitable guide groove 4% on the side frame of the machine. The shaft 42 of the lower drum 34- is mounted in suitable bearings (not shown) carried by swinging brackets one of which is shown at 44. The swinging brackets are mounted for pivotal movement about the axis of the shaft 36 of the upper drum 32 so that the belts 30 can swing outwardly as the diameter of the rolls 24a being wound increases. Within the winding station D the chains 18 travel through chain guides 50 which hold the chains so as to retain the rolls 24 in contact with the drive belts 30 while they are being wound.

An arm 52 is fixed to the slide block 38 and rotatably carries on its outer end a cam follower roller 54 which rides on the periphery of a cam 56. The cam 56 when actuated moves the upper end of the winding drive assembly to the left as viewed in FIG. 2 to push the empty core 12 entering the winding station into contact with the web W as the latter travels over the roller 58 of the slitting assembly G to properly start the operation of winding the roll.

The breaker arm assembly comprises a shaft 64 rotatably mounted by suitable bearings one of which is shown at 62 (FIG. 3) on two stub shafts 64 and 66 fixed to the opposite side frames of the machine. Two arms 68 and 70 (FIG. 3) are fixed to the shaft 60 and project upwardly therefrom. A breaker bar 72 extends between and is fixed to the outer ends of the arms 68 and 70. The breaker bar 72 is provided with a flange portion 74 which is turned inwardly toward the path of travel of the web W and is provided with a rounded nose portion 76.

An actuating arm '78 is fixed to the shaft 60 and rotatably carries a cam follower roller it which rides on the periphery of an actuating cam 82. An arm 84- is fixed to the shaft 60 and a spring 86 fixed between the arm 84 and a pin 88 on a side frame of the machine maintains the roller 3i? in contact with the cam 82.

A brush 90 extends transversely of the machine immediately below the breaker bar 72 and is in contact with each finished roll 24 as the breaker arm is actuated and for a short period of time thereafter. The brush 90 is fixed to an angle bar 92 which in turn is fixed at its opposite ends to the upper ends of two bracket arms 94 and 96. The bracket arms 94 and 96 are fixed at their lower ends to a transverse frame member 98.

In the operation of the machine, the cores 12, having previously been mounted on mandrels 14, are introduced into the machine at station A and are successively picked up and clamped between the spindles 16 on the endless chains 18. The cores 12 pass through the cutting station E where they are severed into individual core sections each the width of the final marketable size roll and through the station C where an adhesive is applied to the cores 12. The cores 12 then approach the winding station D.

As the web approaches the winding station D, it first passes through the transverse perforating mechanism F 2.9 whence it passes through the longitudinal slitting mechanism G which divides it into a plurality of strips each of which corresponds in width to one of the core sections. After passing over the roller 58 of the slitting mechanism G, the several strips pass to the rolis 24a being rotated by the action of the roll driving belts 31). As the rolls 24!: increase in size they are slowly advanced by the chains 18 until they reach marketable diameter at about the position illustrated in FIG. 4.

As the substantially fully wound rolls 24a reach the position illustrated in FIG. 4, the cam 82 has started to move the breaker bar '72 to the right as viewed in that figure, i.e., inward toward the web W far enough for the rounded nose '76 to just contact the web W. Continued inward movement of the breaker bar 72 causes a deflection of the portion of the web W between the roller 58 and the rolls 24a in the manner illustrated in FIG. 5. This deflection increases the length of the web W between the roller 58 and the rolls 24a. Since both the roller 58 and the rolls 24a are traveling at the same peripheral velocity, and since both have considerable inertia, the portion of th web between the roller 58 and the rolls 24a is stretched slightly, thus generating a tensile force therein. As the deflection of Web W is increased, so is the tensile force increased. Since the rounded nose portion 76 of the breaker bar 72 additionally applies a frictional drag to the web W, the tensile force in the web W below the point of contact of the nose portion 76 of the breaker bar '72 will be greater than the tensile force above said point of contact.

The breaker bar 72 continues its advance until the tensile force in the portion of the web W between the nose 76 of the breaker bar 72 and the rolls 24a is sufiicient to cause the web W to sever along one of the previously formed transverse lines of perforations as illustrated in FIG. 6.

The various elements are so positioned that only one such line of perforations is located at any time in the zone of high tensile stress, namely, between the nose portion 76 of the breaker bar '72 and the periphery of the roll 24a, whereby, the web W will be severed cleanly in the one straight line of perforations, completely across the full width of the web.

While the breaker arm 72 has been moving in to break the web W in the manner described above, the cam 56 has been moving the upper end of the winding drive assembly to the left as illustrated in FIG. 6 so that the belts 30 have started the succeeding core 12b rotating, and at the time the web W breaks, the inward deflection of the web by the breaker bar, which has caused the newly developed leading end region of the web to extend between the completed rewound roll and the next succeeding empty core 12b, aids in applying the web to the core and in starting the newly formed end region to wrap around the core, as illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 6. The adhesive previously applied to the core 121) at station C causes the now loose end of the web W to adhere to the new core 12b to start the winding of a new roll 24b in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7.

It will be noted that when the web W is severed, the nearly completed roll 24a is in contact with the brush so that the latter brushes the severed end smoothly onto the roll 24a. This contact with the brush 90 is maintained after the roll 24a passes beyond the drive belts 30 and the frictional force of the contact of the brush 90 slows and stops the rapidly rotating finished roll 24a which then is subsequently discharged from the machine at station E.

While a preferred embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein, it should be noted that various changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended,

claim.

The invention having thus been described, what is claimed and desired to be protected by Letters Patent is:

In a machine for rewinding web having spaced apart lines of web-weakening perforations, said rewinding machine having means for moving a series of adhesive-covered cores successively past a web guide roller, 2. web severing and roll starting mechanism comprising a breaker bar mounted for movement in a path intersecting the path normally followed by the web being pulled from said guide roller to the roll being wound, means on the breaker bar for making frictional sliding engagement with the web, and means operable to project the bar to and through said path of movement of the web in a region spaced from the roll being wound a distance less than the spacing between said lines of perforations to impose additional tension upon the web between the breaker bar and the roll being wound while the web is being dragged over the breaker bar in sliding frictional engagement therewith and thereby pull the web apart at a transverse line of perforations in the web between the breaker bar and the roll being wound.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,681,046 Marresford Aug. 14, 1928 2,186,884 Shomaker Jan. 9, 1940 2,266,995 Schultz et al. Dec. 23, 1941 2,328,582 Ratchford et a1 Sept. 7, 1943 2,361,264 Christman Oct. 24, 1944 2,691,490 Gerard Oct. 12, 1954 2,883,121 Barlament et a1 Apr. 21, 1959 2,902,197 Potdevin et a1 Sept. 1, 1959 2,942,796 Gurney et al June 28, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1681046 *Nov 19, 1924Aug 14, 1928Franklin Marresford WilliamPaper-rolling machine
US2186884 *Jun 22, 1938Jan 9, 1940Shomaker Wesley PWeb cutting mechanism
US2266995 *Jul 26, 1940Dec 23, 1941Schultz Engineering CorpAutomatic rewinding machine
US2328582 *Oct 16, 1940Sep 7, 1943Standard Register CoStrip severing and bursting machine
US2361264 *Mar 6, 1944Oct 24, 1944Paper Converting Machine CoRewinding machine
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US2883121 *Oct 24, 1955Apr 21, 1959Hudson Sharp Machine CoEndless conveyor having web rewinder core shafts
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US2942796 *Aug 26, 1954Jun 28, 1960Monsanto ChemicalsApparatus for winding thermoplastic film into rolls
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3282524 *Jan 3, 1964Nov 1, 1966Dietz Machine Works IncAutomatic winding machine
US3498558 *Jul 24, 1968Mar 3, 1970Paper Converting Machine CoCutoff and transfer mechanism for rewinder
US3704835 *Jul 13, 1971Dec 5, 1972Harley Arthur ERoll changing system
US3791602 *Mar 13, 1972Feb 12, 1974Kimberly Clark CoRoll rewinder transfer apparatus and method
US3897912 *Feb 19, 1974Aug 5, 1975Tajima YoshiharuDevice for automatically winding material onto a core roll
US4723724 *Apr 1, 1986Feb 9, 1988Paper Converting MachineWeb winding machine and method
US4798350 *May 29, 1987Jan 17, 1989Magna-Graphics CorporationWeb rewind apparatus with cutless web transfer
US4856725 *Dec 28, 1987Aug 15, 1989Paper Converting Machine CompanyWeb winding machine and method
US4962897 *Mar 23, 1989Oct 16, 1990Paper Converting Machine CompanyWeb winding machine and method
US4964585 *Mar 16, 1990Oct 23, 1990Sted Engineering S.R.L.Slitting and rewiding machine
US5273222 *May 15, 1992Dec 28, 1993Kampf Gmbh & Co. MaschinenfabrikMultiple-station winding machine for the winding of webs of foil or the like
US5421536 *Jul 19, 1993Jun 6, 1995Paper Coverting Machine CompanySurface winder with recycled mandrels and method
US5660350 *Oct 10, 1996Aug 26, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyMethod of winding logs with different sheet counts
US5667162 *Jun 2, 1995Sep 16, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyTurret winder mandrel cupping assembly
US5690297 *Jun 2, 1995Nov 25, 1997The Procter & Gamble CompanyTurret assembly
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Classifications
U.S. Classification242/521, 242/533.6, 242/541.3, 242/532.3, 60/39.92, 242/533.5
International ClassificationB65H19/26, B65H19/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65H2408/2312, B65H19/26, B65H2301/4148, B65H2301/41894
European ClassificationB65H19/26