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Publication numberUS3148892 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1964
Filing dateJun 17, 1963
Priority dateJun 17, 1963
Publication numberUS 3148892 A, US 3148892A, US-A-3148892, US3148892 A, US3148892A
InventorsMerriott Clyde E
Original AssigneeMerriott Clyde E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Creeper lounger
US 3148892 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

p 1964 c. E. MERRIOTT 3,148,892

CREEPER LOUNGER Filed June 17, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

W&M

P 1954 c. E. MERRIOTT CREEPER LOUNGER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 17, 1963 FIG... 3

FIG.

United States Patent Office 3,148,892 Patented Sept. 15., 1964 3,148,892 CREEPER LOUNGER Clyde E. Merriott, 6102 22nd St., Lubbock, Tex. Filed June 17, 1963, Ser. No. 288,302 6 Claims. (Cl. 28.9-32.6)

This invention relates to improvements in the field of mechanics creepers and more particularly to creepers for aircraft and large auto truck use.

The hands, arms, and shoulders are generally accepted as the mechanics Tools in Trade. Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to make work more accessible to these Tools of Trade or put same in a better position to work.

A further object of this invention is to provide a strong, comfortable creeper from which to perform duties, hence the name creeper lounger. There have been other creepers built with a hinged backrest and several different positions. This invention, however, provides also a hinged seat that tilts automatically as the backrest is raised. This insures against the natural sliding motion of the body; that is it will hold the mechanic firmly in position.

Still another object is to provide nine different settings to hold a rnechanics shoulders in positions ranging from approximately six to twenty-six inches above the floor.

Another feature is the provision of a large headrest cushion which can be adjusted for the height of the mechanics body.

Still further objects are to achieve the above with a device that is sturdy, compact, durable, simple, versatile, and reliable, yet inexpensive and easy to manufacture and operate.

The specific nature of the invention as well as other objects, uses, and advantages thereof will clearly appear from the following description and from the accompanying drawing, the different views of which are not necessarily to the same scale, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the creeper showing the backrest and seat members in the extended position.

FIG. 2 is a side view of creeper in full raised position.

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of seat-backrest assembly detached from the frame for clarity.

FIG. 4 is a perspective of the main frame embodying the seat adjustment serrations.

Frame 1 is built of one long piece of angle iron. The corners of the inside of the angle are cut to fit flush when bent to make a square corner, and are welded on the inside. The frame is rectangular in shape. The frame 1 forms a flat bottom surface. Attached to the frame are four conventional creeper casters 2, one on each corner being attached with four bolts and nuts 3.

Attached to the inside of the frame on one end along each side will be two serrated or notched angle iron metal pieces 4, hereafter called notched adjustment having eight notches which extend upward from the lower portion of the frame, each attached by one bolt and nut 3 of the aforementioned casters 2, and one bolt and nut 5 attaching the other end. These notched adjustment pieces 4 extend from approximately two to seventeen inches from one end.

Attached to the inside edge of the frame and on the opposite end from the notched adjustment are two rollers 6, one on each side, each being attached with one bolt and nut 7 in like positioned holes in frame 1, the holes being drilled so as to'position the upper side of each roller 6 level with the top of frame 1. The three holes on each side are one-half inch apart for adjustment and are positioned in line.

One hole is drilled in each side of the frame 1 for attaching seat-backrest assembly 8, FIG. 3, approximately six inches toward the center of frame 1 from the center hole for roller bolt 7 and five-eighths inch from the bottom edge of the frame.

The seat-backrest assembly 8, FIG. 3, is constructed with five plywood panels with side rails of hardwood. The seat 9 will have a piano hinge 24 attached to the rear upper edge with a light piece of metal on the bottom of the seat forming backing strip 13 with bolts and nuts 20.

Hardwood rails 11 are cut with an approximate 45 degree angle on each inside end. The other ends are cut perpendicular and the corners and upper edges are rounded so as not to leave sharp corners for the mechanic to bump against. They are attached on the top of each side of the seat 9. Wear strips 14 made of light metal are underneath the seat 9. Bolts and nuts 19 extend through each end of rails 11, seat 9, and wear strips 14.

Backrest 10 is attached to the other side of the piano hinge 24 in the same manner as the seat 9. Hardwood rails 12 for the backrest 10 are made in same manner as for seat 9 except longer. They are attached with bolts and nuts 19 which serve a dual purpose, the outer two on each side attaching metal leveling strips 15 underneath each side of the backrest 10. The center bolt 19 underneath each side of the backrest 1i) attaches adjustment rod end brackets 16-which in turn attaches adjustment rod 17 which is a steel rod shaped into a square U and has each end inserted in the brackets 16. The other two bolts 19 on each side of backrest 10 attach the backrest ltl to frame bracket 18 made of angle iron, one flat surface of the bracket having two holes to attach to the backrest It), the other flat side being perpendicular to and extending below and parallel with each side of backrest 10 and having both ends cut at an angle. There is a hole near the piano hinge 24 for attaching the seat-backrest assembly 8 to the frame 1 with bolt 21.

On the extreme top end of backrest 1% is mounted large plastic or leather covered cushioned headrest 23 which is attached with two screws passing through from underneath the backrest in either of three pairs of holes 25 in the backrest.

The bolts 21 are the only attaching points for seatbackrest assembly 8 to the frame 11). They act as pivot points. The rollers 6 are pivots for the seat 9., The metal leveling strips 15 rest on the frame .1 in full ex tended position. The piano hinge 24 is the pivot point between the seat 9 and backrest 10.

When the backrest 10 is raised, the hinge'24 tilts down, dropping the rear part of the seat 9. The seat 9 in turn riding on rollers 6 which are stationary in any of three positions, will force the seat 9 up in front. A mechanic t sitting on seat-backrest assembly 3 will not have any sliding tendencies.

The aforementioned three positions of the rollers 6 are obtained by removing the attaching bolts of said rollers and reinstalling them in another pair of matched holes in the frame 1. This adjustment will govern the degree of tilt of the seat 9 in relation to the backrest 10.

It will be. noted that the frame 1 is over of the combined length of the seat 9 and backrest 10. This is so that when the backrest is elevated as seen in FIG. 2, that the creeper as a whole will be stable. It will be understood that as a mechanic works that he will exert leverage pressure, thus he will be using the backrest 10 as a platform to exert pressure against the material he is working upon, so therefore it is necessary that he have as large a frame 1 as possible with which to work. I

It will be apparent that the embodiment shown is only exemplary and that various modifications can be made in construction, materials, and arrangement within the scope'of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A creeper lounger comprising in combination (a) a rectangular frame,

(b) said frame having a caster at each of the four corners thereof,

(c) said frame formed of angle iron,

(d) said angle iron having a leg extending horizontal and a leg extending vertically upright from the horizontal leg,

(e) abackrest,

(f) a seat,

() the seat hinged to the backrest,

(h) the backrest pivoted to the frame adjacent to where the backrest is hinged to the seat,

(1') rollers attached to the frame below the seat,

(i) wear strips attached to the underside of the seat.

(It) said wear strips of the seat riding upon said rollers,

(1) means for maintaining the backrest in an elevated,

angular relationship to the frame;

(m) so arranged and constructed that when the backrest is elevated, the hinge connection between the backrest and the seat is depressed and the rollers elevate the forward end of the seat.

2. The invention as defined in claim l with the addition (n) a plurality of holes extending through the backrest,

(0) a headrest,

(p) said headrest having bolts extending through some but not all of the holes in the backrest whereby, by moving the bolts to different holes, the position of the headrest may be adjusted.

3. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein the length of the frame is over 90% of the combined length of the seat and backrest so that when the backrest is elevated that the frame provides a stable platform therefor.

4. The invention as defined in claim 1 wherein the means for maintaining the backrest in an elevated angular position with respect to the frame includes an U-shaped rod pivoted to the backrest.

5. The invention as defined in claim 4 wherein:

(n) reinforcing rails extending along the longitudinal edges of the seat and backrest,

(0) the hinge connection between the seat and the backrest is a piano hinge on the topsides and there is a metal backing strip attached to the undersides of the seat and backrest to reinforce the structure at this (s) pivot bolts extending through the frame into the frame bracket. *6. A creeper lounger comprising in combination (a) a rectangular frame,

(b) said frame having a caster at each of the four corners thereof,

(0) said frame formed of angle iron,

(0!) said angle iron having a leg extending horizontal and a leg extending vertically upright from the horizontal leg,

(e) a backrest,

(f) a plurality of holes extending through the backrest,

(g) a headrest,

(It) said headrest having bolts extending through some, but not all of the holes in the backrest whereby by moving the bolts to different holes, the position of the headrest may be adjusted,

(i) a seat,

(j) the length of the frame being over of the combined length of the seat and backrest so that when the backrest is elevated that the frame provides a stable platform therefor,

(k) the seat and backrest constructed of panels with (l) reinforcing rails along the longitudinal edges there- (m) the seat hinged to the backrest,

(n) the hinge connection between the seat and the backrest being a piano hinge on the top thereof and (0) metal backing strips below the backrest and seat adjacent the hinge,

(p) the backrest pivoted to the frame adjacent to where the backrest is hinged to the heat,

(q) the backrest is hinged to the frame by frame brackets which are bolted to the backrest by bolts which extend through the frame bracket and the reinforcing rails,

(s) rollers attached to the frame below the seat,

(I) wear strips attached to the seat below the seat,

(14) said wear strips of the seat riding upon said rollers,

(v) means for maintainingthe backrest in an elevated,

angular relationship to the frame;

(w) said means for maintaining the backrest in an elevated angular position with respect to the frame including an U-shaped rod pivoted to the backrest,

(x) the U-shaped rod pivoted to the backrest by brackets, and

(y) bolts holding the rod brackets to the backrest extending through the reinforcing rails for reinforcing,

(2) so arranged and constructed that when the backrest is elevated, the hinge connection between the backrest and the seat is depressed and the rollers elevate the forward end of the seat.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,218,519 Bradley Mar. 6, 1917 2,208,945 Miller July 23, 1940 2,509,934 Murray May 30, 1950 2,663,029 Whitley et al. a- Dec. 22, 1953 2,710,758 Stettner June 14, 1955 3,049,376 Rosenthal Aug. 14, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1218519 *Dec 15, 1913Mar 6, 1917John H BradleyBed-frame.
US2208945 *Nov 18, 1938Jul 23, 1940Miller Bernard SCombined reclining chair and reading stand
US2509934 *May 28, 1947May 30, 1950Murray Glen DRepairman's creeper
US2663029 *Dec 13, 1951Dec 22, 1953Eunice G WhitleyHead support
US2710758 *Mar 24, 1953Jun 14, 1955Stettner Hugo WMechanic's creeper with adjustable headrest
US3049376 *Jan 16, 1961Aug 14, 1962Rosenthal HarryBaby chair bed
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4909524 *Dec 22, 1987Mar 20, 1990Stardrive Design And Development, Inc.For working under a vehicle
US5318312 *Mar 1, 1993Jun 7, 1994Jesse MontemayorPortable folding utility carrier
US6425590 *Jun 5, 2000Jul 30, 2002Whiteside Mfg. Co.Combination mechanic's creeper and chair
US6578857 *Aug 15, 2001Jun 17, 2003Whiteside Mfg. Co.Creeper with adjustable pad positions
US6702305 *Jul 15, 2001Mar 9, 2004United Auto Systems, Inc.Inclinable creeper
US7377538Feb 7, 2003May 27, 2008Myrna Lea StuartShopping buddy
US7481438 *Jul 17, 2006Jan 27, 2009Alltrade Tools, LlcMulti-position mechanic's creeper with tool tray
US20120235371 *Mar 15, 2011Sep 20, 2012Smith Craig SMultiposition mechanic's creeper
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/32.6, 297/342, 5/652
International ClassificationB25H5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25H5/00
European ClassificationB25H5/00