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Publication numberUS3148963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 15, 1964
Filing dateFeb 20, 1961
Priority dateFeb 20, 1961
Publication numberUS 3148963 A, US 3148963A, US-A-3148963, US3148963 A, US3148963A
InventorsDe Nuke Anthony
Original AssigneeDe Nuke Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making a buffing wheel
US 3148963 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 15, 1964 A. DE NUKE METHOD OF MAKING A BUFFING wnsm.

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 20. 1961 Se t. 15, 1964 A. DE NUKE METHOD OF MAKING A BUFFING WHEEL 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 20, 1961 Sept. 15, 1964 A. DE NUKE METHOD OF MAKING A BUFF'ING WHEEL 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 20. 1961 United States Patent 3,148,963 METHOD OF MAKING A BUFFING WHEEL Anthony De Nuke, RR. 3, Bothwell, Ontario, Canada Filed Feb. 20, 1961, Ser. No. 90,435 6 Claims. (Cl. 51-293) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in bufling wheels.

At present there are several types of buffs manufactured, and known. One type is a helically wound strip of material doubled up widthwise and wound around a hub. Another type uses a plurality of pre-pleated material wound around a hub and extending radially outward. Another discloses a strip of fabric cut in pieces on the bias and mounted on an axle.

The present invention relates to an improvement in the manufacture of buffs.

The main object is to provide a method of making butts that is durable, inexpensive to manufacture, and simple in construction.

Another object is to provide a butt that is actually a combination butt in that is there is one buff inside the other.

Another object is to provide a buff that is formed to contin a bufiing compound between the overlapping folds of the buff.

Due to the way the cloth for the bufl is cut and wound a buffing compound, for example, tripoli, in liquid form may be brushed on the pleated strips of cloth forming the butt. The pleats of cloth and the rounds of stitching used in making the buff act as pockets and hold the buffing compound till each round of stitching is wore through when the buff is in use. As each round of thread is wore through more bufling compound is forced out by centrifugal action. Upon testing it was discovered that enough bufling compound can be inserted to last the life of the bufr. If tripoli is used as the bufiing compound the buffs should be used up in a reasonable length of time, or should be stored in a cool and dry room.

The butfs can be made with all new cotton or entirely from used and discarded buffs. Due to their construction and flexibility they are excellent for butting odd shaped, grooved, ribbed and concaved castings and aluminum moldings and similar pieces. On most jobs today they will outwear the buifs at present on the market. The cost of material and the labor used in their manufacture is relatively very low.

Huge quantities of used bufls are purchased at scrap prices. From these the cotton, outside ring and steel centers are recovered for reuse in making the buffs of the present invention. Due to the diffeerence in price between the buff made of new cotton and the rebuilt bufi most of the customers prefer the rebuilt buflt.

The cost of machinery and tools to manufacture the bufr's is very low as the buffs are made on flat steel rings or forms, gauge. The for-ms are used over and over for an unlimited number of times. The machines, jigs and fixtures, other than sewing machine and cloth cutter, can be made right in the shop where the buffs are manufactured, with very little material and cost, taking into consideration that all sizes and types, from 3 inches to 22 inches, of butts are to be made.

The invention consists in the novel arrangements, combinations and construction of parts hereinafter described and shown in the drawings;

FIGURE 1 is a plan view of one form of the buff partly disassembled.

FIGURE 2 is a view of part of the strips being wound to form the buff in FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of another form of the buff disassembed partly.

3,148,963 Patented Sept. 15., 1964 ice FIGURE 4 is a view of part of the cloth being wound to form the buflE in FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is a plan view of another form of the buff partly disassembled.

FIGURE 6 is a plan view of another form of the butt partly disassembled.

Referring to the drawings, particularly to FIGURES 1 and 2, it will be seen that the buff comprises a center ring 1 shown in dotted lines in FIGURE 1 and for-med of suitable material, preferably steel. Overlapping strips 2 extend outwardly on the bias and are passed around the center ring 1 to whatever diameter the buff is desired to be made. The buff may be made with as many layers of the over-lapping material as desired. The strips 2 are sewn together helically as shown in FIGURE 1.

The method of manufacturing the buff shown in FIG- URES 1 and 2 is by using a flat circular form of the diameter of the buff desired, placing spacer hooks between the outer flat form and the center ring 1, winding a long strip of tape that has been impregnated with buffing compound, for example tripoli, around both the ring 1 and the fiat form in a biased overlapping manner as shown in FIGURE 1 to the desired thickness. The strips are then stitched together as shown at 3, the strips of tape cut around the outer edge 4 and the fiat form removed for further use.

The above type of buif is excellent for all around buffing, will not rip or snag, wraps around and over rough castings and is excellent for automatic or pushup type of butting machines. It will hold more bufiing compound than any other type of buff.

Referring to FIGURES 3 and 4 there is shown another type of construction of the buff. The inner layers are formed of sheets of cloth 5 passed around the center ring 1 to whatever thickness of buff is desired. Overlapping strips of cloth 6 extend outwardly on the bias over the inner layers 5. The inner layers 5 and the outer strips of cloth 6 are impregnated with buffing compound before being placed in position. The layers 5 and 6 are sewn together helically from the center ring 1 to the necessary distance from the outer edge.

The bufi shown in FIGURES 3 and 4 is manufactured similar to that shown in FIGURES l and 2, by using a I flat circular form, spacing hooks between the fiat form and the center ring 1, winding the bufiing compound im pregnated cloth 5 around the ring and form to the necessary thickness, winding the bufling compound impregnated strips of tape 6 on the bias over the cloth 5, sewing helically the cloth and the tape from the center ring 1 to the inner circumference of the fiat form, cutting the cloth 5 and the tape 6 at the outer edge, and withdrawing the flat form.

The type of buif shown in FIGURES 3 and 4 is used for hard all around buffing on steel, aluminum, brass, copper or chrome. The cloth threads on this buff run in so many different directions that extra Wear is obtained. The rounds of stitching 7 and the size of thread used determines the stifiness of this type of buff.

Referring to FIGURE 5 there is shown another type of bufi which is structurally the reverse to that shown in FIGURE 3, in that the inner strips of cloth 8 extend outwardly on the bias to the diameter of buff desired, and the outer layers 9 are formed of sheets of cloth extending outwardly over the inner strips of cloth 8.

This form of butt in FIGURE 5 is used for soft and medium polishing and can be sewn to the outer edge to stiffen the buff.

Referring to FIGURE 6 there is shown another type of butt in which the inner layers are formed of strips of cloth 10 extending outwardly on the bias to the desired diameter of the buff and flat sheets of cloth 11 covering 3 the strips of cloth 10. If it is helically sewn together with the stitching A inch apart it makes an extra hard buff. It can be used for hard and fast cutting.

In the construction of the modifications of the buff above described the buffing compound, for example, tripo- 1i, is added to the cloth, and then when the cloth is sewn to the flat form and the inner ring, and due to the construction of the buff is self feeding due to the centrifugal force produced.

While the invention has been shown and described with particular reference to specific embodiments, it is understood it is not to be limited thereto but is to be construed broadly and limited only by the scope of the claims.

The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

l. A method of making a bufiing wheel comprising the steps of successively winding a plurality of layers of fabric around an inner ring and spaced outer circular form concentric to said ring to form a laminated fabric disk with some of the layers disposed with the threads on a bias to the threads of the other layers, sewing the layers of fabric together by a helical row of stitching between the ring and outer form, cutting the layers of fabric along the outer edge and removing the outer form.

2. A method of making a bufiing wheel as described in claim 1 including the step of impregnating the layers of fabric with a buffing compound.

3. A method of making a bufiing wheel comprising the steps of Winding a fabric around an inner ring and spaced concentric outer circular form to form a plurality of fabric layers, winding a strip of fabric around said ring and form obliquely to the radius of the ring with the edges of the strip in lapped relation, sewing the layers and strip of fabric together by a row of stitching between the ring and form, cutting the layers of fabric and strips of fabric around the outer edge of the form and then removing the form.

4. A method of making a bufiing wheel as described in claim 3 wherein the layers of fabric are formed with pleats to form spaced laps.

5. A method of making a buffing wheel comprising the steps of Winding a strip of fabric around an inner ring and spaced concentric circular form with the edges of the strip overlapped, winding a fabric around the inner ring and circular form to form layers of fabric in superimposed relation to the wound strip of fabric, sewing the fabric strip and layers of fabric together, cutting the strip and layers of material along the outer edge of said form and then removing the form.

6. A method as described in claim 5 wherein the layers of fabric are pleated to form spaced overlaps.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1511245 *Apr 21, 1921Oct 14, 1924Triska Joseph JSelf-feeding buffing wheel
US2738626 *Apr 2, 1954Mar 20, 1956Albert Lyon GeorgeSurface-treating assembly and method of making same
US2803097 *Mar 2, 1955Aug 20, 1957American Buff CompanyCombination sisal and cotton buff
US2943426 *Nov 25, 1957Jul 5, 1960Schlegel Mfg CoBuffing wheel
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3336621 *Feb 21, 1966Aug 22, 1967George Jeske BernardBuff wheel
US4536195 *Oct 1, 1984Aug 20, 1985Kabushiki Kaisha Komatsu SeisakushoElectroconductive pattern bonded with abrasive grains, immersion in electrolytic bath, stacking and hot pressure molding
US5643068 *May 26, 1995Jul 1, 1997Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyAbrading wheel having individual sheet members
Classifications
U.S. Classification51/293, 451/533, 51/297
International ClassificationB24D13/04, B24D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationB24D13/045
European ClassificationB24D13/04B