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Publication numberUS3150049 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 22, 1964
Filing dateSep 22, 1959
Priority dateSep 22, 1959
Also published asDE1467879B1
Publication numberUS 3150049 A, US 3150049A, US-A-3150049, US3150049 A, US3150049A
InventorsMartin F Emory
Original AssigneeMartin F Emory
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bath oil
US 3150049 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Se t. 22, 1964 M. F. EMORY 3,150,049

' BATH QIL Filed Sept. 22, 1959 PLASTIC POUCH FOLDED PAD IMPREGNATED WITH BATH OIL INVEN TOR MARTIN F. EMORY BY M Mfi-M ATTORNEYS.

United States Patent Office 3,150,049 Patented Sept. 22, 1964 3,150,049 BATH 01L Martin F. Emory, 1 Gracie Terrace, New York, NY. Filed Sept. 22, 1959, Ser. No. 841,601 16 Claims. (Cl. 167-90) This invention relates to bath oils and it has particular relation to homogeneous compositions which contain a perfume oil and are adapted to be used as bath oils.

The main object of the present invention is to provide a bath oil composition for use in bathing water, which contains pine oil or any other perfume oil of any desired fragrance in homogeneous colloidal distribution, is clear and stable on storage and, when added to water, is evenly and substantially dispersed to very fine particles capable of being taken up by wet human skin. Moreover, the product leaves a very thin, substantially uniform layer of oil on the surface of the human skin, when added to, and used in the bath. Said uniform layer of oil that is left on the skin, is acquired all over the body at one time by immersion and without massage.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a bath oil composition which contains ingredients benefical to the skin and which is absorbed and/ or absorbed from the bath Water by human skin and thereby smoothens and protects the skin and prevents a loss of moisture from the skin for a considerable period of time.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide a bath oil composition which, when added to the bathing water, leaves the human skin covered with a thin protective film of oil for long periods after the bath.

A further object of this invention is to provide bath oil preparations of the above described type distributed on a carrier therefor, said carrier consisting of fibrous material, e.g. fibrous tissues, towelettes, pads, and the like.

Further objects and the advantages of the invention will be apparent from the appended claims and the following specification which describe by way of example and without limitation some specific embodiments of, and some best ways of carrying out, the invention.

It has been found that a bath oil composition meeting all requirements, such as clearness, pleasant odor, absence of any irritating eifect, stability on storage and uniform colloidal dispersion in water to very fine particles which are quickly absorbed and/ or adsorbed by human skin, is obtained by proceeding as follows.

Pine oil, or another perfume oil having equivalent properties, and a suitable amount of lecithin are mixed under stirring with isopropyl palmitate and/or isopropyl myristate, and/or cosmetically applicable vegetable oil, and/or esters of other saturated or unsaturated monoor dicarboxylic acids having six carbon atoms or more, which are liquid and oily in character, are homogeneously miscible with the other ingredients of the composition, do not undergo polymerization and are cosmetically applicable, i.e., do not have irritating or other undesired effects, and/or mixtures of these substances, until a liquid product of uniform composition is formed which may or may not be filtered. This product is stable on storage and disperses to very fine particles of the above mentioned type, when brought in contact with excess water, e.g., poured into bathing Water. Into the liquid product consisting of pine oil, lecithin, and the ingredients described above, a neutral, stable non-irritating mineral oil product, e.g., the product known under the name liquid petrolaturn can be incorporated in order to bring it to the desired consistency and concentration.

Example 1 12.5 parts by weight of pine oil and 1.5 parts by weight of lecithin are mixed under stirring at a temperature of 60-80 C. with 50 parts by weight of isopropyl palmitate and 36 parts by weight of isopropyl myristate, to form a uniform mixture. To the latter 100 parts by weight of liquid petrolatum having at 60 F. a specific density of 0.830-0880 are added under stirring and the mixture is filtered, if necessary, in order to obtain a clear liquid.

ExampleZ A bath oil composition is prepared by mixing under stirring at a temperature of 75 C. the following ingredients:

Parts by weight Pine oil 12.5 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl palmitate 40.0 Isopropyl myristate 46.0

Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 50 Example 3 A bath oil composition is prepared in the manner described in the above Example 1, from the following ingredients:

Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 100.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 5 Parts by weight Rosemary oil 12.5 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl palmitate 50.0 Isopropyl myristate 36.0

Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 100.0

are mixed to a uniform composition in the manner described lIltlIlB above Example 1.

Example 6 Parts by weight Pine oil 12.5 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl palmitate 26.0 Isopropyl myristate 60.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 7 p Partsby weight Pine oil 12.50 Lecithin 1.75 Isopropyl palmitate 35.75 Isopropyl myristate 50.00

are used for the preparation of a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 8 Parts by Weight Pine oil. 12.5 Lecithin 1.6 Isopropyl palmitate 85.9

are mixed to a homogeneous liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1. This described in the above Example 1.

JD composition becomes semi-solid or solid on cooling, but becomes liquid upon warming, e.g., to 1825 C., or higher.

Example 9 Parts by weight Pine oil 10.0 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl myristate 88.5

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 10 Parts by weight Pine oil 10.0 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl myristate 75.0 Liquid petrolatum (same as above) 13.5

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 11 Parts by weight Pine oil 10.0 Lecithin 1.5 Isopropyl palmitate 65.0 Liquid petrolatum (same as above) 23.5

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1. The perfume oil is a compounded pine oil.

Example 13 Parts by weight Isobornyl acetate 6.0 Lecithin 2.0 Dioctyl sebacate 42.0 Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 50.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 14 Parts by weight Rosemary oil 8.0 Lecithin 1.25 Butyl stearate 41.75 Sesame oil 55.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1 Example 15 7 Parts by weight Lavender oil 12.0 Lecithin 1.5 .Sesame oil 50;0

Isopropyl myristate 36.5

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1. r

are mixed'to a liquid ba'th oil composition in the manner Example 17 Parts by weight Pine oil 8.0 Lecithin 1.75 Olive oil 20.25 Dibutyl sebacate 20.0 Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 50.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 18 Parts by weight Spike lavender oil 10.0 Lecithin 1.5 Dioctyl adipate 15.0 Isopropyl myristate 23.5 Liquid petrolatum 50.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 19 Parts by weight Rosemary oil 7.5 Lecithin 2.0 Cotton seed oil 20.0 Dibutyl phthalate 45.5 Isopropyl palmitate 25.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 20 Parts by weighit Pine oil composition 6.0 Lecithin 1.0 Diethyl sebacate 45.0 Liquid petrolatum (as used in Example 1) 48.0

are mixed to a liquid bath oil composition in the manner described in the above Example 1.

Example 21 In the above examples, instead of liquid petrolatum other petroleum oils having equivalent properties (particularly miscibility, boiling range, lack of toxicity and absence of irritating effects) can be used preferably in substantially equal amounts. The liquid petrolatum as well as said other petroleum oils should preferably have a specific density in the range of 0.830 to 0.905.

Instead of petrolatum, or in mixture with the same, or in mixture with the above mentioned other petroleum oils, alcohol can likewise be incorporated in the compositions of the invention.

While the above examples illustrate the preparation of satisfactory bath oil compositions embodying the present invention, it will be understood that this invention is not limited to the steps, conditions, proportions and other details specifically described above and can be carried out with various modifications. For example, instead of the perfume oil-s described in the above examples, other perfume oils or compounded perfume oils (perfume oil compositions), for example, eucalyptus oil and petit-grain oil can also be used. The term perfume 'oil is used-throughout the present application to include also compounded perfume oils. The proportions of the individual ingredients may also vary. For example, in preparing a bath oil composition from (a) pine oil, ([1) lecithin, (c) isopropyl palmitate and (d) isopropyl myristate the proportions of these ingredients can vary within the following limitsa 7 Percent by weight said percent by weight being based on thetotal weight of the ingredients ((1), (b), (c) and (d). However, as illustrated by the above Examples 8 and 9, e.g., equal amounts of isopropyl palmitate and isopropyl myristate can be mutually substituted for each other in the composition of the invention. Furthermore, the isopropyl palmitate and/ or the isopropyl myristate, can be, partly or entirely, substituted by one or more vegetable oils, and/or one or more of the above mentioned esters of carboxylic acids, whereby, e.g., equal amounts of the respective substances can be used in such substitutions. Thus, the compositions of the invention may also contain (e) vegetable oils and/or (1) esters of the above described carboxylic acids, each in the range of 15 to 60% by weight based on the total weight of the ingredients and (1)- Into such compositions liquid petrolatum can be incorporated in any desired proportion up to about 100% by weight based on the total weight of said ingredients (a) to (f), inclusive. The preferred proportions of the various ingredients are indicated by the above examples.

As further examples of the carboxylic acid esterswhich may be esters of saturated or unsaturated, aliphatic, carbocyclic, or heterocyclic carboxylic acids, and can be used in carrying out this invention-the following are mentioned: dimethyl phthalate, dihexyl sebacate, diglycol oleate, and n-butyl oleate. Esters of acids containing 6-17 carbon atoms in the molecule have been found to give satisfactory results. Dioctyl or dihexyl adipate can also be used.

It has been found that, in order to attain the above stated objects of the invention, the invention must be carried out in the manner described above and defined in the appended claims, whereby the effects of the invention appear to result from a synergistic or co-action of the individual ingredients.

The vegetable oils used in carrying out this invention must be stable, homogeneously miscible with the other ingredients of the composition and cosmetically applicable. This term cosmetically applicable is used in the present application to denote and include products which do not have irritating or other undesired eifects on the human organism, particularly the skin and do not have an undesirable odor.

In order to distribute the compositions embodying this invention on a fibrous carrier, an absorptive fibrous sheet material, such as paper, tissue, towelette or pad consisting of cellulosic or equivalent absorptive fibers, is folded, impregnated with a liquid composition according to the invention and the impregnated piece is then placed in a pouch of plastic material, e.g., cellophane r cellulose acetate, which is then hermetically sealed in conventional manner. The impregnated piece placed in the pouch may be of oblong rectangular shape of, e.g., 4" x 2" before folding. Upon opening the pouch, e.g., by tearing, the towelette placed therein is ready for use. The towelette is then unfolded and wet surfaces of the human skin, e.g., body and face, are rubbed with the towelette immediately after a bath or shower and before drying. The appended drawing diagrammatically illustrates a plastic pouch and an impregnated folded towelette, or pad, placed therein, parts of the pouch and towelette being broken away. The plastic material of the pouch or container must be inert to the bath oils according to the present invention.

Reference is made to my co-pending patent applications filed under Ser. No. 488,157 on February 14, 1955, for Bath Oil, and Ser. No. 668,864 filed July 1, 1957, for Bath Oil, both abandoned, of which this is a continuation-in-part.

What is claimed is:

1. A bath oil composition consisting essentially of 5 to 20% by weight of perfume oil; 0.5 to 3.0% by weight of lecithin, the balance to 100% consisting of at least one substance selected from the group consisting of cosmetically applicable vegetable oils and esters of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids having at least 6 carbon atoms in the molecule, said composition being stable on storage and, when brought in contact with excess water, is uniformly dispersed to very fine particles.

2. A bath oil composition as claimed in claim 1, in which liquid petrolatum is incorporated up to an amount equal to the total weight of the other ingredients.

3. A composition according to claim 1, said substance being isopropyl palmitate.

4. A composition according to claim 1, said substance being isopropyl myristate.

5. A bath oil composition as claimed in claim 1, consisting substantially of 5 to 20% by weight of perfume oil, 0.5 to 3.0% by weight of lecithin, 15' to 60% of isopropyl palmitate and 15 to 60% by weight .of isopropyl myristate.

6. A bath oil composition as claimed in claim 5, in which liquid petrolatum is incorporated up to an amount equal to the total weight of the other ingredients.

7. A bath oil composition as claimed in claim 5, in which the perfume oil is pine oil.

8. A bath oil composition consisting essentially of about 12.5 parts by weight of perfume oil, about 1.5 parts by weight .of lecithin, about 50.0 parts by weight of isopropyl palmitate, about 36.0 parts by weight of isopropyl myristate and about parts by weight of liquid petrolatum, said composition being a stable liquid which is uniformly dispersed when introduced into excess water.

9. A bath oil composition as claimed in claim 8, in which the perfume oil is pine oil.

10. A bath oil composition consisting essentially of 5 to 20% by weight of perfume oil; 0.5 to 3.0% by weight of lecithin, the balance to 100% consisting of at least one substance selected from the group consisting of cosmetically applicable vegetable oils and esters of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids having at least 6 carbon atoms in the molecule, said composition being stable on storage and, when brought in contact with excess water, is uniformly dispersed to very fine particles; said composition being introduced into and distributed on a carrier consisting of a piece of an absorptive fibrous sheet material, said carrier being enclosed in a hermetically sealed pouch of a plastic material.

11. A hermetically sealed pouch containing an absorptive fibrous sheet material impregnated with bath oil composition, all according to claim 9, said substance being isopropyl palmitate.

12. A hermetically sealed pouch containing an absorptive fibrous sheet impregnated with bath oil composition, all according to claim 9, said substance being isopropyl myristate.

13. The process of applying a bath oil to the skin which comprises wetting the skin by bathing, and while the skin is Wetted from the bathing, rubbing over the skin a piece of an absorptive fibrous sheet material impregnated with the bath oil, whereby to transfer bath oil to the skin, said bath oil consisting essentially of 5 to 20% by weight of perfume oil; 0.5 to 3.0% by weight of lecithin, the balance to 100% consisting of at least one substance selected from the group consisting of cosmetically applicable vegetable oils and esters of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic acids having at least 6 carbon atoms in the molecule, said bath oil being stable on storage and, when brought in contact with excess water, being uniformly dispersed to very fine particles.

14. The process of claim 13, wherein said substance is isopropyl palmitate.

15. The process of claim 13, wherein said substance is isopropyl myristate.

16. A bath oil composition consisting essentially of 5 to 20% by weight of perfume oil; 0.5 to 3% by weight of lecithin, the remainder of said composition containing a combination of both isopropyl palmitate and isopropyl myristate, said composition being stable on storage and UNITED STATES PATENTS 302,073 Wheeler July 15, 1884 1,969,900 Pickett Aug. 14, 1934 2,498,727 Verblen Feb. 28, 1950 OTHER REFERENCES Janistyn, Riechstoffe, Seifen Kosmetika, vol. II, 1950,

Spalton, Pharrn. Emulsions and Emulsifying Agents,

8 The Chemist and Druggist, London, 1950, pp. 23-26,

Streatfield, vol. 24, Soap, Perf. and 00s., August 1951,

Pears, Perfumery and Essential Oil Record, 44:3,

March 1953, pp. 84-90, 101.

Sisley, Encyclopedia of Surface Active Agents, 1952, Chemical Publishing Co. Inc., New York, N.Y., page 487. JAPha, 17:8, August 1956, p. 538 (Prac. Pharrn. Ed.). Sagarin, Cosmetics Science and, Technology, 1957, Interscience Publishers, Inc., New York, N.Y., page 843.

Drug and Cos. Ind., 81 :2, August 1957, p. 165.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3567118 *Sep 5, 1968Mar 2, 1971Nat Patent Dev CorpEntrapped essences in dry composite fiber base products giving a strong fragrance when wet in water
US3806593 *May 30, 1972Apr 23, 1974Medisan AbHygienic-cosmetic compositions
US4112167 *Jan 7, 1977Sep 5, 1978The Procter & Gamble CompanySkin cleansing product having low density wiping zone treated with a lipophilic cleansing emollient
US4332319 *Jun 25, 1980Jun 1, 1982Hurwood David LHygienic comfort product
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US4659495 *Aug 2, 1985Apr 21, 1987Figliola Vincent NBath product and method for treating bath water
US4788060 *Oct 27, 1986Nov 29, 1988Abbott LaboratoriesMultiple electrolyte douche and wipe composition
US4834076 *Apr 15, 1986May 30, 1989Millet Jean MDevice for treating the external human epithelium, process for its manufacture and process for using such a device
US4844251 *Aug 7, 1987Jul 4, 1989L'orealContainer means for separately storing at least two products to be brought into contact at the time of use
US4848572 *Jun 4, 1987Jul 18, 1989Herrera Patricio BSanitary napkin containing antiseptic towelette
US4877781 *Sep 30, 1987Oct 31, 1989Peter G. LaHayeTixocortol pivalate, ephedrine sulfate, pramoxine hydrochloride; antiinflammatory agents for hemorrhoids
US4901851 *Mar 29, 1988Feb 20, 1990Martincic GerryCleaning package
US5286538 *Aug 3, 1992Feb 15, 1994Leonard PearlsteinDisposable container for moist paper towels the same
US5350067 *Dec 29, 1992Sep 27, 1994Beltran Patricio HPackaging system
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US5458933 *Dec 17, 1993Oct 17, 1995Leonard PearlsteinCompostable packaging for containment of liquids
US5512333 *Apr 6, 1994Apr 30, 1996Icd IndustriesTreating interior surfaces of paperboard with corona discharge, coating with biodegradable polymer, coating exterior surface with polymer containing photodegradable polyolefin
US5540962 *Apr 6, 1994Jul 30, 1996Leonard PearlsteinBiodegradable
US5558873 *Mar 8, 1995Sep 24, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationSoft tissue containing glycerin and quaternary ammonium compounds
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US5885697 *Dec 12, 1997Mar 23, 1999Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Addition of wax uniformly distributerd on surface to increase the ability of the oil to remain at the surface of the tissue
US5915394 *Aug 10, 1998Jun 29, 1999Rickard; PeterFragrance towelette
US7350256 *Sep 23, 2004Apr 1, 2008The Procter & Gamble CompanyChild's aromatherapy cleaning implement
US7647667 *Feb 1, 2008Jan 19, 2010The Procter & Gamble CompanyChild's fragrant cleaning implement
WO1988006016A1 *Feb 10, 1988Aug 25, 1988Gert SoederstroemSun oil applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification424/447, 206/.5, 512/5, 206/823, 206/812, 206/525, 15/104.93, 514/785, 206/484
International ClassificationA61K8/02, A61K8/55, A61Q19/10, A45D37/00, C11D1/00, A61K8/92
Cooperative ClassificationA61K8/0208, A61K8/922, A45D2200/1036, Y10S206/812, A61Q19/10, A45D37/00, Y10S206/823, A45D2200/1018, A61K8/553
European ClassificationA45D37/00, A61K8/92C, A61K8/02C, A61Q19/10, A61K8/55C