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Publication numberUS3151338 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1964
Filing dateApr 19, 1963
Priority dateApr 19, 1963
Publication numberUS 3151338 A, US 3151338A, US-A-3151338, US3151338 A, US3151338A
InventorsNunnery Carroll J
Original AssigneeNunnery Carroll J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for flushing toilets
US 3151338 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

6, 1964 c. J. NUNNERY 3,151,338

- APPARATUS FOR FLUSHING TOILETS Filed April 19, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 l0 9i N 0 |1H r Ill] 9 Pg log INVENTOR.

United States Patent 3,151,338 APPARATUS FOR FLUSHIN G TOILETS Carroll J. Nunnery, 2803 Sandwood St., Lakewood, Calif. Filed Apr. 19, 1963, Ser. No. 274,201 16 Claims. (Cl. 4-41) This invention relates to a flush tank apparatus for toilets, and in particular to a device wherein pressure is utilized over and above that which obtains in the case of a purely gravity-feed type of flush tank.

In the use of gravity systems, flushing operations, in order to approach reasonable efficiency, require unduly large storage tanks, which is not only cumbersome and expensive, but wasteful of water. Furthermore, the flushing action is of somewhat dubious efiiciency, leading to a need for frequent cleaning of the bowl, and an unsatisfactory condition at all times, in respect to unsightliness and odors.

It is therefore a principal object of the invention to provide a flushing device with improved flushing action for a toilet bowl, and also to remove odors by propelling odor-causing gases into the sewer. Another object is to achieve the aforesaid object in a flushing device for a toilet bowl which is also saving of water.

Yet another object, related to the foregoing is to provide a flushing device in which line pressure is utilized, for flushing, in addition to pressure due to gravity alone, in connection with a storage tank of minimum size, for rinsing and refilling. More particularly, it is an object to provide a flushing device in which line pressure is brought into play through a suitable valve, in a system having controls governing action of the gravity, tank pressure, for cooperative action of the two pressure systems. A still further object is to ensure refilling of the bowl, in all cases, subsequent to flushing and rinsing.

These and other objects, which will be apparent, are

attained by the present invention, a preferred form of which is described in the following specification, as illustrated in the drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a toilet bowl, with an associated flush tank and piping, constructed accordin g to the invention,

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view, enlarged, through the flush tank, taken on the plane of the line 22 of FIG- URE 1,

' FIGURE 3 is a sectional view through the time delay valve, taken on the plane of the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2,

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view through the toilet bowl, taken on the plane of the line 44 of FIGURE 1,

FIGURE 5 is a transverse, sectional view through the flush tank, taken on the plane of the line 5-5 of FIG- URE 2, w

FIGURE 6 is a view of the flush tank of FIGURE 2, showing the filler valve float lowered, and the filler valve open,

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view through the pressure injection pipe, taken on the line 7-7 of FIGURE 4,

FIGURE 8 is-a sectional View taken on the line 88 of FIGURE 7.

Referring to the drawings by characters of reference there is shown a toilet bowl 10, of generally conventional construction, having, at its rear, a commodious pipe 12, for flushing purposes, the upper end of which is secured to the underside of, and forms the outlet pipe for a waterstorage tank 14, which may have additionalsupport by attachment to a wall surface. It Will be noted, by'comparison with bowl 10, that the tank 14 is considerably smaller than the tankconventionally associated with an all-gravity system, and this is an important feature of the invention, as set forth in more detail hereinafter. As usual, the tank is provided with, a readily removable cover 16.

3,151,338 Patented Oct. 6, 1964 Inwardly of the tank, the filler pipe, float, and filler valve are conventional, with the ring-form, hollow float 18 arranged in surrounding relation to the upstanding filler pipe 20, with a system of links controlling the valve action, including a pair of links 22, 24, the former anchored on an arm 26 on a sleeve 28, mounted on pipe 20, and the link 24 pivoted to one end of a rocker arm 30, medially pivoted on an arm 32 on sleeve 28, and pivoted at its other end to an arm 34, rising from float 18. Arm 22 carries a valve rod 36, with a frusto-conical head 38, and it will be obvious from casual inspection that valve head 38 descends upon its seat 49, within the pipe 20, upon rise of the float 18, and lifts from its seat upon descent of the float. Control of the movement of this float, and consequent valve action, is one of the features of the present invention, as will be seen.

The flushing device according to the present invention comprises a main delivery line for the flush water which is indicated by the numeral 42, in FIGURES 1 and 2, and as seen in those figures, the line divides into two branches 44, 46, of which the former leads to the filler pipe 20 in the tank 14, and is thus conventional, taken alone, and the line 46 leads, generally, to the bowl 111. The features of novelty in the invention will be found to reside in the line 46, which communicates line pressure to bowl 10, and mechanism associated with pipe 12, both within the pipe and within the tank 14. Thus, the top opening of flush pipe 12, Within tank 14, is normally closed off by a frustoconical plug 48, which corresponds to the usual ball valve, in its main function, but differs therefrom in several respects. Alternatively, plug 48 may have a flat bottom. Instead of being lifted from its seat by action of an external hand lever, the plug 48 is raised by line pressure in the branch 46, as communicated through the upper end of a T pipe 50, within pipe 12, the short leg 52 of which communicates with a lateral nipple 54 on pipe 12, communicating with branch 46 through a delay valve 56, secured by a pair of unions, or doubly threaded coupling sleeves 58. For this lifting action, the plug 48 has an elongate, upper head 60, with a blind bore 62 leading through the plug head 48, and accommodating the upper end of pipe 50 in a loose sliding fit.

The tubular head 66 has an internal, annular rib 59 seating an O-ring 61, and pipe 50 has an external, annular rib 63 adapted to be contacted by the 0-ring during rise of the head, to cam it into initial closing relation between rib 59 and pipe 50, full closure of the O-ring seal being thereafter accomplished by the line pressure, so that no water under line pressure runs subsequently into pipe 12. Alternatively, the .O-ring could be carried on a collar on pipe 50. From the structure thus far described, it will be seen that pressure in line 42 will be communicated through branch 46 and the upper end of pipe 50, to lift plug 48 from its seat. In this movement, the shank 60 of the plug has extra guidance in a surrounding sleeve 64, in which shank 60 is slidably mount- 20 by a set screw 70. A compression coil spring, 71, sur-- rounding head 60, acts against sleeve 64, to bias plug 48 to seating position. As shown in FIGURE 5, the shank 60 is square in cross section, and sleeve 64 is correspondingly square, but these may be round, or of other shape. Near its upper end, shank 60 carries a rod 72, adapted to contact the underside of float 18, to hold inlet valve 38 against its opening, in'consequence of the rise of shank 60 in response to the line pressure. This, besides concentrating the entire line pressure on flushing, has the additional effect of saving water, by preventing its entry into the tank during the flushing and rinsing operawater from the tank, respectively.

The flushing and rinsing are carried out through pipes 59 and 32, respectively. Thus, as seen in FIGURES 4, 7 and 8, the lower end of pipe 50 passes through the usual flush passage '74 in the rear of the porcelain bowl 10, leading to the bottom region thereof, below the residual water level 76, the lower end of the pipe passing through a plug 78 of plastic or rubbery material, which has the effect of constricting the passage 74. Preferably, the bottom end of pipe 59 will be flattened, as at 80, into a fishtail form to provide an exit slit which will widen the range of action of the pressurized fluid, while at the same time providing a jet action. The seal 78 is also provided with a short length of through pipe 82, for slowly draining that portion of water from the tank which runs into passage 74. This draining is not completed until after flushing and rinsing have ceased, and therefore refilling of the bowl is guaranteed.

After passage 74 has been filled with water from the tank, passing through pipe 12, it passes into the usual, annular passage 81, in the toilet bowl rim, and out through inner openings 83 in the bowl to run down the sides thereof, and provide the rising action.

From the foregoing it will be clear that upon opening of the valve 56, the action will consist in a pressurized stream downward through pipe 50, which thoroughly scavenges the bottom of the bowl while forcing the contents out through the bowl trap exit. At the same time, the line pressure through the upper part of pipe 50 lifts plug 48 from its seat, allowing whatever water is in the small tank 14 to flow through pipe 12, to fill passage 74, and also run down the inside of the bowl, to provide the rinsing action. While this drainage of the tank is proceeding no fresh water gets into the tank, because the rise of plug 48- under the line pressure holds the valve 38 closed. In the embodiment shown, valve 56 is a timedelay valve, and after a suitable interval it closes, releasing the upward pressure on shank 60, permitting plug 43 to seat, with float 18 falling, and valve 38 opening,

and fresh water thus permitted to flow into tank 14 until cut off by rise of float 18. The time valve is a mere refinement, since a simple valve, timed by the user, may be equally well employed. The particular valve chosen for illustrative purposes, shown in some detail in FIG- URE 3, is of the dashpot type, the main housing of the valve 56 having a pair of diametrically opposite, laterally extending nipples 84, receiving the coupling sleeves 58. Slidable in a central bore 86 of the valve housing is a plunger comprising a pair of collars 88, 90, separated by an annular channel 92. On one end, the plunger has an axial shank 94, slidable in a central bore in a screw cap 96 on the valve housing, and having an end-mounted push button 98, and at its other end carries a similar shank 1%, adapted to slide in a cup-form compartment 102. on the end of the valve housing. A compression coil spring 164, surrounding shank 1G0 biases the plunger normally to a position wherein the collar 83 is in covering relation to the passages in nipples 84, and the push button is in extended position. Movement of the plunger to this closed position of the valve is impeded by a very smali bore tee in the cap 96, which gives the dashpot effect, the timing being determined by the size of the bore. For the quick opening movement of the valve, pressure relief in advanced the plunger is provided in a relatively large opening 198- in the cup 1li2,.and pressure relief behind the plunger is provided in a ball check valve 110 in cap 96.

In recapitulation, the cycle of operations is summarized as follows: Assuming the storag'etank full, and

valves 38 and 4% closed, opening of valve 56 results in passage of water 'throughbranchA. Almost immediately, the line pressure in tube causes head-6t) to rise and interrupt fall of float 18, so that there is no passage of water-into the storage tank. At the same time, the 0-.

ring cuts off line pressure water from passing into pipe 12. From the moment of. opening of the valve, flushing of contaminated water into the line.

action takes place in the bottom of the bowl through tube 50, and water from the storage tank is draining through pipe 12 into passage 74, where it builds up, due to the restricted outlet 82, and through passage 81 and openings 83, to provide the rinsing action, which in a normal case, may persist for about 7 seconds. About two seconds later, the flushing tube will be still operating, but the rinsing action may be complete, and the line pressure may be shut off at the valve. Thereupon, the flushing ceases, the head 60 drops, with valve 48 sealing off the tank. This also frees the float 18, permitting it todrop, raising valve 38, so that line water runs into the tank until cut off by rise of the float. While the tank is refilling, the water in passage 74 is slowly draining into the bottom of the bowl, and this phase may be completed in about three minutes.

While a system of extensive structure and manifold functions has been illustrated in the drawings, and described above, it should be understood that the invention, in its broadest aspect, contemplates a relatively simple, sub-structure of the system, which embraces the pressure line 46, the valve 56, the transverse arm 50 of the T pipe system, and the tubular head 60 with its internal seal. This constitutes a flush system under line pressure and acting beneath the surface of the residual bowl water, and with the head 60 acting as an anti-siphon device, which upon release from pressure permits introduction of air into the system to defeat any tendency toward suck-back On this basic frame work the several other functions are built, as interdependent, such as the plug 48, which seals oil? the tank, the provision of a second feed line branch 44, and the interaction of head 60 with a float valve to delay flow of water into the tank. These ancillary modes of action are related to the rinsing function, and to the ensuring of residual water-in the bowl.

From the foregoing description of structure and operation, it will be apparent that the objects enumerated'htereinabove are attained in ample measure.

While a certain, preferred embodiment has been shown and described, various modifications will be apparent, in the light'of this disclosure, and the invention should not, therefore, be deemed as limited, except insofar as shall appear from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A flush device for toilet bowls comprising a fluid conduit adapted for connection to a fluid system under pressure, a hand valve in said conduit, a pair of branch fluid lines leading from an end of said conduit, one of said lines for connection to a toilet bowl and the other of said lines for connection to a storage tank, said one line mountable so that its terminal end is under the surface of the residual water in a toilet bowl, and a closure cap mounted in surrounding relation to the end of the other of said lines and axially slidable with respect thereto.

2. A flush device for toilet bowls comprising a fluid conduit adapted for connection to a fluid system under pressure, a hand valve in said conduit, a pair of branch fluid lines leading from an end of said conduit, one of said lines for connection to a toilet bowl and the other of said lines for connection to astorage tank, said one line mountable so that its terminal end is under the surface of the residual water in a toilet bowl, a closure cap mounted in surrounding relation to the end of the other of said lines and axially slidable with respect thereto, and annular sealing means between the inside of said cap and the outside of said other of said lines, operable in an outward position of slide of said cap.

3. A flush device for toilet bowls comprising a fluid conduit adapted for connection to a fluid system under pressure, a hand valve in said conduit, a pair of branch fluid lines leading from an end, of said conduit, oneof said lines for connection to a toilet bowl and theother of said lines for connection -to a storage tank, said one'line of the residual water in a toilet bowl, a closure cap mounted in surrounding relation to the end of the other of said lines and axially slidable with respect thereto, an external rib on said other of said lines, and an internal rib on said cap, and a ring-form sealing means between said ribs.

4. A device as in claim 1, said conduit having a branch apart from said valve, and adapted for connection to a reservoir tank.

5. A flush device for toilet bowls comprising a fluid conduit adapted for connection to a fluid system under pressure, a hand valve in said conduit, a pair of branch fluid lines leading from an end of said conduit, one of said lines for connection to a toilet bowl and the other of said lines for connection to a storage tank, said one line mountable so that its terminal end is under the surface of the residual water in a toilet bowl, a closure cap mounted in surrounding relation to the end of the other of said lines and axially slidable with respect thereto, annular rib means between the inside of said cap and the outside of said other of said lines, and a ring-form seal coacting with said rib means.

6. A flush device for toilet bowls comprising a pipe adapted for attachment to a toilet bowl at one end and to a water tank at its other end, and having a lateral opening, a conduit having a hand valve and secured in communicating relation to said opening, a pair of branch lines communicating with said opening and leading in opposite directions within said pipe, one of said lines mountable so that its terminal end is beneath the residual water in the bottom of a toilet bowl, a closure cap slidably mounted on the end of the other of said lines and a fluidsealing means between the inside of said cap and the outside of said other of said lines operable at an outer position of slide of said cap in response to fluid pressure in said lines.

7. A device as in claim 6, the end of said one of said lines being flattened into fish-tail form.

8. A device as in claim 6, said pipe being attached to a toilet bowl, said one of said lines located in a wall passage in said bowl, and a partition sealing off said passage at a position short of the end of said one of said lines, said partition having a restricted orifice.

9. In a device as in claim 6, a water tank attached to said pipe, said cap being located within said tank, and having a plug arranged to close the end of said pipe, in the absence of pressure in said branch lines.

10. In a device as in claim 9, spring means normally urging said plug to pipe-closing position.

11. In a device as in claim 6, a water tank attached to said pipe, a branch conduit upstream from said valve and leading into said tank, a float valve in said tank controlling flow from said branch conduit, and detent means responsive to outer movement of said cap to prevent opening of said float valve.

12. A device as in claim 6, said pipe being attached to a toilet bowl, said one of said lines located in a wall passage in said bowl, and having a flattened discharge end, and a partition sealing off said passage at a position short of the said end of said one of said lines, said partition having a restricted orifice.

13. A device as in claim 6, said pipe being attached to a toilet bowl, said one of said lines located in a wall passage in said bowl, and a partition sealing off said passage at a position short of the end of said one of said lines, said partition having a restricted orifice, and a water tank attached to said pipe, said cap being located within said tank, and having a plug arranged to close the end of said pipe, in the absence of pressure in said branch lines.

14. In a device as in claim 13, spring means normally urging said plug to pipe-closing position.

15. A device as in claim 6, said pipe being attached to a toilet bowl, said one of said lines having a flattened end and located in a Wall passage in said bowl, a partition sealing off said passage at a position short of the flattened end of said one of said lines, said partition having a restricted orifice, a water tank attached to said pipe, said cap being located within said tank, and having a plug arranged to close the end of said pipe, in the absence of pressure in said branch lines, a branch conduit upstream from said valve and leading into said tank, and float means responsive to outward movement of said cap to prevent flow through said'branch conduit into said tank.

16. A device as in claim 15, said means comprising a valve-controlling float, positioned to be arrested by said cap in its outward movement.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 715,453 Adee Dec. 9, 1902 1,119,812 Deignan et al. Dec. 8, 1914 1,142,092 Haas June 8, 1915 1,205,078 Barron Nov. 14, 1916 2,341,116 Owens Feb. 8, 1944 2,448,231 Molloy Aug. 31, 1948 2,527,909 Bowers Oct. 31, 1950 2,740,129 Braswell Apr. 3, 1956 2,744,262 Boyd May 8, 1956 2,867,820 Gray Jan. 13, 1959 3,088,122 Pore May 7, 1963

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US715453 *Jun 5, 1902Dec 9, 1902Fred AdeeFlushing device for water-closets.
US1119812 *Sep 8, 1913Dec 8, 1914John A DeignanWater-closet.
US1142092 *Oct 30, 1913Jun 8, 1915Philip HaasWater-closet valve.
US1205078 *Jun 2, 1916Nov 14, 1916Andrew F BarronCloset-bowl.
US2341116 *Jun 3, 1943Feb 8, 1944Owens John HHydraulic flush valve mechanism
US2448231 *Aug 21, 1946Aug 31, 1948Molloy James FToilet flushing assembly
US2527909 *Sep 4, 1948Oct 31, 1950Leslie M BowersUnitary valve assembly for flush tanks
US2740129 *Jan 25, 1954Apr 3, 1956Jr James Walter BraswellValve mechanism for flush tanks
US2744262 *May 27, 1953May 8, 1956Boyd Ritter MargarettaValve operating mechanism
US2867820 *Jul 8, 1957Jan 13, 1959Alessandra GraySubmerged flushing device
US3088122 *Jul 22, 1960May 7, 1963Pore Glen LFlushing tank actuator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4901377 *Oct 31, 1988Feb 20, 1990Weir Richard LToilet bowl automatic flow shut off and water saver device
EP1676966A1 *Dec 28, 2004Jul 5, 2006Flushtech CorporationWater-separating apparatus for toilet tank
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/380, 4/407
International ClassificationE03D5/02, E03D3/10, E03D1/24, E03D3/00, E03D1/28, E03D5/00, E03D11/06, E03D1/00, E03D11/02
Cooperative ClassificationE03D1/00, E03D5/024, E03D1/286, E03D3/10, E03D2201/30, E03D5/00, E03D11/06, E03D3/00
European ClassificationE03D5/02C, E03D11/06, E03D3/10, E03D1/00, E03D1/28D, E03D5/00, E03D3/00