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Publication numberUS3151345 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1964
Filing dateOct 16, 1961
Priority dateOct 16, 1961
Publication numberUS 3151345 A, US 3151345A, US-A-3151345, US3151345 A, US3151345A
InventorsHenry Massop Anthony
Original AssigneeHenry Massop Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of cleaning and finishing drapes
US 3151345 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 6, 1964 A. H. MASSOP METHOD OF CLEANING AND FINISHING DRAPES Filed Oct. 16, 1961 Ill' 2 INVENTOR:

ANTHONY H. MASSOR United States Patent ""ce 3,151,345 METHOD OF CLEAN ENG AND FINISHING DRAPES Anthony Henry Massop, 331 Rosemmy SE, Grand Rapids, Mich. Filed Oct. 16, 1961, Ser. No. 145,388 Claims. (Cl. 815(l) This invention relates to the cleaning and finishing of drapes. Conventional cleaning procedure involves a tumbling action in a drum of cleaning solution, and the usual suspension hooks on draperies present a problem. If left in place, the tumbling action produces a tendency for the hooks to engage and tear the fabric. To remove and replace the hooks involves a tremendous amount of labor, and labor is the principal cost determinant in cleaning operations.

The present invention provides a procedure which isolates and confines the hooks, but does not interfere with the cleaning action. According to the preferred procedure, the drapes are first folded at the upper end approximately in the middle so that the fold line is parallel to the length. The opposite edges are thus brought together; and in this position, the upper portion of the drape is rolled so that the fold appears at the outer part of the roll. The fold is made so that the hooks on the drapery are on the inside of the fold, and the resulting rolled portion therefore leaves none of the hooks exposed. Preferably, this rolled portion is secured by placing it in a bag of nylon mesh, with the bag having a draw string which can be tied to hold the assembly together. In this condition, the drape can be placed in a conventional dry-cleaning machine without fear that the hooks will engage the fabric. The length of the bag (and the consequent placement of the draw string) can be selected to produce a resulting crease at a point which is easily reachable by the conventional pressing equipment without the necessity of special operations. The several features of the invention will be discussed in further detail through an analysis of the accompanying drawing. In the drawmg:

FIGURE 1 presents a perspective view of a conventional drape showing the normal position of suspension hooks along the upper edge.

FIGURE 2 illustrates the manner in which the drape is folded and rolled prior to the installation of the retaining bag.

FIGURE 3 illustrates the completed installation of the permeable bag on the rolled drape.

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of a recommended form of retaining bag.

Referring to the drawing, the upper portion of a conventional drape is indicated generally at 10. The top hem area 11 is provided with a series of spaced suspension hooks 1246, and the pleats 1740 are normally positioned opposite these hooks. In preparing the drape iii for cleaning, the upper portion is folded at 21 (refer to FIGURE 2), and the resulting folded drape is rolled. The rolling is begun at the edges 22 and 23, and it will be noted that the fold 21 is made in such a manner that the hooks 24 are disposed on the inside. The roll may then be inserted in the permeable bag 25 and confined as shown in FIGURE 3 by tightening and knotting the draw string 26. A conventional connecting device may be used in place of a knot, if desired. The upper portion of the drape may be gathered in some other form than the rolling illustrated in FIGURE 2, but this has been found to be the preferable arrangement for compacting the drapery material in such a manner that it is easily secured without exposing any of the hooks. The material of which the bag 25 is made is preferably of an open- 3,151,345 Patented Get. 6, 1964 mesh nylon, and this construction provides adequate permeability and access for the cleaning solution to the drape without sacrificing the confinement necessary to eliminate the danger of exposed hooks.

The length 27 of the bag 25 should be selected with the pressing operation in mind. The length of the hem 11 determines the axial positioning of the pleat extensions 2831. If the crease in the drape caused by the presence of the draw string 26 is too near the hem 11, it becomes very diificult to apply a standard pressing machine between the pleats, and it is therefore desirable to establish a length 27 of approximately 12 to 14 inches in order to position the crease at a point far enough down from the hem so that it is easily reachable by the conventional presser end without requiring a special construction. The space between the adjacent pleats on the drape will also influence this position at which the standard pressing machine can be applied, but it has been found that a bag of the length suggested above (assuming the upper end or" the drape to be inserted for the full depth of the bag) will be adequate so that special pressing operations will not be necessary.

The particular embodiments of the present invention which have been illustrated and discussed herein are for illustrative purposes only and are not to be considered as a limitation upon the scope of the appended claims. In these claims, it is my intent to claim the entire invention disclosed herein, except as I am limited by the prior art.

I claim:

1. A method of cleaning and finishing drapes that are provided with a group of spaced suspension hooks adjacent the upper edge, said method comprising: folding said drapes parallel to the normally vertical dimension thereof with the suspension hooks on the inside of the resulting fold; rolling the upper portion of said drapes about an axis which extends substantially vertically when said drapes are suspended by said hooks from a support, said axis being substantially parallel to the said fold, with the said fold on the exterior of the resulting roll; inserting and securing exclusively the rolled upper portion in a permeable bag; cleaning said drapes; and removing the said bag.

2. A method of cleaning and finishing drapes that are provided with a group of spaced suspension hooks adjacent the upper edge, said method comprising: folding said drapes parallel to the normally vertical dimension thereof with the suspension hooks on the inside of the resulting fold; rolling the upper portion of said drapes about an axis which extends substantially vertically when said drapes are suspended by said hooks from a support, said axis being substantially parallel to the said fold, with the said fold on the exterior of the resulting roll; inserting and securing exclusively the rolled upper portion in a permeable bag; and cleaning said secured drapes.

3. A method of cleaning and finishing drapes that are provided with a group of spaced suspension hooks adjacent the upper edge, said method comprising: folding said drapes parallel to the normally vertical dimension thereof with the suspension hooks on the inside of the resulting fold; rolling the upper portion of said drapes about an axis which extends substantially vertically when said drapes are suspended by said hooks from a support, said axis being substantially parallel to the said fold; wrapping exclusively the rolled upper portion with permeable material; and cleaning said wrapped drapes.

4. A method of cleaning and finishing drapes that are provided with a group of spaced suspension hooks adjacent the upper edge, said method comprising: rolling the upper portion of said drapes about an axis which extends substantially vertically when said drapes are suspended by said hooks from a support, said axis being substantially parallel to the normally vertical dimension thereof With the said suspension hooks on the inside of the resulting roll; confining exclusively the rolled upper portion with permeable material; and cleaning said confined drapes.

5. A method of cleaning and finishing drapes that are 5 References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 685,952 Sullivan Nov. 5, 1901 1,231,165 Jay June 26, 1917 2,112,627 Kohnle Mar. 29, 1938 OTHER REFERENCES National Institute of Dry Cleaning Bulletin Service,

10 Technical No. T-79, Aug. 14, 1939, 2 pages.

Div. 43.)

- Laundry Age, Nov. 25, 1951, page 26.

(Copy in

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US685952 *Jul 24, 1901Nov 5, 1901Robert J SullivanCase for fish-hooks.
US1231165 *Sep 18, 1916Jun 26, 1917James William JayFishing-fly holder.
US2112627 *Sep 1, 1936Mar 29, 1938Monarch Marking Systems IncCoiled pin tag strip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3376718 *Nov 25, 1966Apr 9, 1968Leo M. KahnVertical washer and dryer
US3432253 *Apr 27, 1966Mar 11, 1969Coppock Alden DFabric cleaning process
US3466666 *Nov 9, 1967Sep 16, 1969Deering Milliken Res CorpTrousers and process for improving shape retention during cleaning
US3512923 *Feb 17, 1969May 19, 1970Coppock Alden DDry cleaning process
US4388739 *Feb 17, 1981Jun 21, 1983Martinon Gerard RaymondWashing bag for curtains, drapes and the like
US4960161 *Dec 26, 1989Oct 2, 1990Madlyn EasleyReady-made curtain system including swags and jabots
US5067542 *Apr 26, 1991Nov 26, 1991Intrascapes, Ltd.Ready-made swag and jabot curtain system
US5082466 *Jan 22, 1990Jan 21, 1992Fabritec International CorporationAnti-static garment bag for reducing static buildup in the drycleaning process
US5092384 *Sep 28, 1990Mar 3, 1992Intrascapes, Ltd.Curtain system and method
US5238587 *May 14, 1992Aug 24, 1993Creative Products Resource Associates, Ltd.Dry-cleaning kit for in-dryer use
US5658651 *Sep 29, 1995Aug 19, 1997Creative Products Resource, Inc.Fabric treatment and softener system for in-dryer use
US5746776 *Aug 20, 1996May 5, 1998Creative Products Resource, Inc.Dry-cleaning kit for in-dryer use
US5972041 *Jan 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Creative Products Resource, Inc.Fabric-cleaning kits using sprays, dipping solutions or sponges containing fabric-cleaning compositions
US5997586 *Jan 13, 1998Dec 7, 1999Smith; James A.Dry-cleaning bag with an interior surface containing a dry-cleaning composition
US6036727 *Sep 29, 1997Mar 14, 2000Creative Products Resource, Inc.Anhydrous dry-cleaning compositions containing polysulfonic acid, and dry-cleaning kits for delicate fabrics
US6086634 *Aug 4, 1997Jul 11, 2000Custom Cleaner, Inc.Dry-cleaning compositions containing polysulfonic acid
US6132474 *Feb 19, 1998Oct 17, 2000Custom Cleaner, Inc.Fabric-cleaning bag having absorptive inner layer
US6179880Jun 29, 1999Jan 30, 2001Custom Cleaner, Inc.Fabric treatment compositions containing polysulfonic acid and organic solvent
US6238736Jul 24, 1998May 29, 2001Custom Cleaner, Inc.Process for softening or treating a fabric article
US6254932Mar 14, 2000Jul 3, 2001Custom Cleaner, Inc.Fabric softener device for in-dryer use
US6658760 *Feb 19, 2002Dec 9, 2003Milliken & CompanyBag for home dry cleaning process
Classifications
U.S. Classification8/150, 8/159, 8/142, 160/330, 68/235.00R, 8/137
International ClassificationD06B5/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06B5/00
European ClassificationD06B5/00