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Publication numberUS3151650 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1964
Filing dateMar 1, 1963
Priority dateMar 1, 1963
Publication numberUS 3151650 A, US 3151650A, US-A-3151650, US3151650 A, US3151650A
InventorsBeck Howard G
Original AssigneeGen Tire & Rubber Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic closure for multicompartment receptacle
US 3151650 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. G. BECK Oct. 6, 1964 3,151,650 PNEUMATIC CLOSURE FOR MULTICOMPARTMENT RECEPTACLE 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 1, 1963 IIIH lllv INVENTOR Howard G. B eck ATTORNEYS H. G. BECK Oct. 6, 1964 PNEUMATIC CLOSURE FOR MULTICOMPARTMENT RECEPTACLE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 1, 1963 I "l llllllllllllllll la INVENTOR Howard G. Beck ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,151,659 PNEUMA'IIQ crosnnn For: MULTIcoMPAnr- MENT ancarractn Howard G. Beclr, Medina, Ghio, assignor to The General Tire & Rubber Company, Ahon, Qhio, a corporation of Ghio Filed Mar. 1, 1963, Ser. No. 262,932 11 Claims. (Cl. 150- 1) This invention relates to pneumatic closure devices and more particularly to a pneumatic closure for sealing the access end of a multicompartment concrete receptacle for transporting the ingredients of a concrete mix to the location where the charge is to be mixed and poured.

It is desirable in multicompartment concrete mix receptacles of the type having a waterproof inner compartment for receiving dry cement and a waterproof outer compartment for receiving water and aggregate such as that shown in US. patent application S.N. 153,024, that the access end of each compartment have a means for providing an air tight seal. This is essential in order to prevent evaporation of water in the compartment containing the water and aggregate, and to prevent moisture from contacting the dry cement in the cement compart ment.

Heretofore closure devices on multicompartment concrete mix receptacles have been of the sleeve type wherein a flexible fabric sleeve is attached to the opening of each compartment to provide a guide channel for charging the compartments with mix. After the compartments were charged, the sleeves were folded flat against the access end of the receptacle.

This arrangement is awkward during the charging of the compartments and does not provide a satisfactory air tight seal. The present invention utilizes a pneumatic arrangement for closing the access to each compartment and provides a greatly improved sealing of the receptacle which is considerably more effective than any other arrangement previously known.

The closure of the present invention utilizes two annular pneumatic bags arranged one within the other, which are mounted to expand radially outward when inflated. The inner annular pneumatic bag which seals the inner compartment is mounted to the outer wall of a centrally mounted compressed air receiving container and when inflated expands outwardly therefrom to close the access to the inner compartment. The outer annular pneumatic bag is mounted on a rigid circular ring and when inflated expands outwardly therefrom to seal the access to the outer compartment. Thus, when sufficient air pressure is introduced into the bags, the walls of the bags will engage the surfaces defining the access or throat to each compartment with sufficient force to provide an air tight seal.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a closure for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle which may be used to provide an air tight seal for the compartments of the receptacle once the receptacle has received its charge and which may be easily opened to permit the contents of the receptacle to be dumped.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a closure for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle which is of simple, low cost construction and which may be easily opened and closed Without requiring special mechanical equipment in a minimum amount of time.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a pneumatic closure for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle which may be installed in the access to the receptacle and which may be easily inflated to seal the compartments once the receptacle is charged, and deflated when it is desired to dump the charge for mim'ng.

I we

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a pneumatic closure for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle of the type having an annular outer compartment and a circulm inner compartment located within said outer compartment, which is arranged to seal the compartments independently of one another topre vent evaporation of water in the compartment containing water and aggregate and to prevent the entry of moisture into the compartment containing the dry cement.

The multicompartment concrete mix receptacle of the type for which the closure of the present invention is designed generally has an outer tubular wall which is composed of rubber reinforced with a plurality of plies of tire fabric and which has inwardly extending ends terminating in inextensible beads to which end closures may be connected. The receptacle is divided into inner and outer compartments by an inner tubular wall of rubber which is sealed from the outer wall by connection at its opposite ends to such end closures.

Reference should be had to the accompanying drawings forming part of this specification in which:

FIGURE 1 is a front elevation with parts broken away, of a multicompartment receptacle having a pneumatic closure embodying the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal central section on an enlarged some of a pneumatic closure embodying the present invention, showing the pneumatic bags in their inflated condition;

FIGURE 3 is a top elevation of a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle having a closure embodying the present invention and showing a fork lift of a lift truck engaging the closure for hoisting the receptacle;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary longitudinal central section showing a pin extending from a fork on a fork lift truck engaging a portion of the closure for hoisting the receptacle;

FIGURE 5 is a longitudinal central section of a pneumatic closure embodying the present invention, showing the pneumatic bags in their collapsed or deflated condition;

FIGURE 6 is a longitudinal central section of a pneumatic closure embodying the present invention, showing a modified arrangement for inflating the pneumatic bags;

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary longitudinal section of the modified form of the invention shown in FIGURE 6 showing a pressure release valve located in the outer rim of the closure of the type used in the modification;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary side elevation of the modification shown in FIGURE 6 showing the pressure release valve;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary section taken along the line 99 of FIGURE 8 showing the valve in its closed position;

FIGURE 10 is a fragmentary central section of the modification shown in FIGURE 6 showing the arrangement for clamping the flexible pneumatic bag material to the compressed air receiving container;

FIGURE 11 is a fragmentary central section of the modification shown in FIGURE 6 showing the air passage through the bottom of the compressed air container;

FIGURE 12 is a fragmentary central section of the modification shown in FIGURE 6 showing the arrangement for clamping the flexible pneumatic bag material to the inner ring of the frame.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, there is shown a multicompartment receptacle of the general type for which the pneumatic closure of the present invention is designed. The receptacle generally comprises an outer flexible tubular wall 1 formed of fabric reinforced rubber, the wall 1 having an elongated body portion 2 of substantially cylindrical form and end portions 3 and 4 extending radially inwardly from the body portion. The end portions 3 and 4 terminate in beads (not shown) which define central openings at the ends of the receptacle, the beads being reinforced with inextensible bead rings such as those used in beads of pneumatic tires.

The receptacle has an inner flexible tubular wall 5 of elastic rubber coated fabric material that extends axially of the receptacle to divide the same into an inner compartment 6 and an outer compartment 7 that surrounds the compartment 6. The inner wall 5 has a cylindrical body portion with an inturned end portion 8 having a flexible wire bead (not shown) throughout its circumference. Normally water and aggregate in a measured quantity to provide a desired concrete mix are poured into the outer compartment 7, and dry cement, also of a measured quantity to provide a desired concrete mix, is poured into the inner compartment 6.

When it is desired to empty the compartments for mixing the dry cement, water and aggregate, the receptacle may be carried by an eye 9 at the bottom of the receptacle and supported in an inverted position while the ingredients are dumped into a concrete mixer.

Located at the access end of the receptacle is a closure A embodying the present invention, as best shown in FIGURE 2. The closure comprises a frame assembly broadly indicated by the numeral 10 for mounting the pneumatic members. The frame member 16 includes an outer annular ring 11 to which the outer wall 1 of the receptacle is attached. Located in the ring are two circular openings 12 and 13 diametrically positioned, for receiving circular pins 14 extending inwardly from the prongs 15 of a fork lift (FIGURE 3).

This arrangement is best shown in FIGURE 3 where the prongs 15 of a fork lift are positioned adjacent the circular openings 12 and 13 of the frame. When in this position, the pins 14 may be inserted into the openings as best shown in FIGURE 4. In this position, the prongs of the fork lift may be used to lift and support the receptacie while it is being filled and to transfer the charged receptacle to a truck or other transportation vehicle.

The frame ring 11 has an inwardly flanged portion 16 which defines a circular opening forming a throat 17 (FIGURE 5) for the outer compartment 7. Located in the flanged portion 16 are circular openings 18 for receiving bolts 1? which engage a spider member 20. The spider member 21 includes an outer ring 21 which engages the flange of the frame ring 11 and which serves to clamp the end portion 3 of the outer tubular wall to the frame ring, a series of downwardly and inwardly extending radiating bars or rods 22, and an inner ring 23 supported by the bars or rods 22. The inner ring 23 forms an inner wall for the throat 17 of the outer compartment 7 as shown in FIGURE 2, and the outer wall of a throat 24 of the inner compartment 6. The wall of the inner compartment 6 is attached to the outer portion of the inner spider ring 23 by circular bands 25 which press a portion of the rubber material into annular grooves 26 in the ring 23. Extending inwardly from the spider ring 23 is a mounting bar 27 which intersects the center line of the closure. Mounted on the bar 27 is a com pressed air container broadly indicated by numeral 28 and preferably formed of metal. A bolt 29 which extends through a circular opening 30 in the bar 27 is used to mount the container 28 in position.

The container 28 is in the form of a longitudinally extending cylinder and provides an inner wall for the throat 24 of the inner compartment 6. At the upper end of the container 28 are two valves 31 and 32. The valve 31 is an inflation valve of the conventional type which upon depression by an inflation nozzle permits compressed air from a suitable compressor hose to enter the cylinder 28, and when released seals the chamber to prevent the escape of compressed air contained therein. The valve 32 is a one shot type release valve for deflating the closure. When depressed, this valve provides an opening for the escape of compressed air and will continue to provide an opening even when released until the closure is entirely deflated.

Mounted on the outer wall of the container 28 is a flexible annular inner pneumatic bag 33 preferably of a rubber coated fabric material. The bag may be formed by doubling back one end portion of a continuous rubber sleeve and clamping the two end portions together against the wall of the container 28 using a rigid clamping ring 34 as shown in FIGURE 2. This forms an air tight pneumatic bag which when inflated expands to completely close the inner throat 24. A threaded flanged boss 35 having a circular opening 36 therethrough is threaded in a circular opening 37 in the wall of the compressed air container 28 and extends into the pneumatic bag 33 to provide a conduit for directing compressed air from the container 28 into the inner pneumatic bag 33.

Attached to the spider ring 23 is aflexible annular outer pneumatic bag 38 preferably of a rubber coated fabric material. The bag may be formed by doubling back one portion of a continuous sleeve and clamping the two ends together in an annular groove 39 formed in the outer surface of the spider ring 23 by a clamping ring 40. Integrally mounted in the inner wall of the pneumatic bag 33 is a rigid metal ring or band 41. The band is positioned between layers of the rubber coated fabric material as shown in FIGURES 2 and 5 and forms a rigid framework for positioning the outer pneumatic bag 38.

The bag 33 is arranged to expand outwardly when inflated to engage the outer ring 11 of the frame which forms the outer wall of the throat 17 of the outer compartment 7. Thus, when the bag is fully inflated it seals the outer compartment 7 and the water and aggregate contained therein.

Attached to the inner wall of the pneumatic bag 38 and extending therethrough is a flexible air conduit 42, one end of which is connected to the compressed air container 28. The conduit 42 provides a passage for compressed. air from the container 28 to the outer pneumatic bag 38 to provide for inflation or deflation of the outer pneumatic bag 38.

The pneumatic bags 33 and 38 are best shown in deflated condition in FIGURE 5. As there shown, they provide both an access into the outer compartment 7 through the outer throat 17 for introducing water and aggregate, and an access into the inner compartment 6 through the inner throat 24 for introducing dry cement mix.

FIGURES 6 through 12 show a modified closure arrangement embodying the present invention which includes several structural changes, and in which like parts are indicated by like numerals.

The closure B of this modification includes a frame 50 similar to the frame of the closure shown in FIGURES 1 through 5. The spider member 51 includes an inner spider ring 52 which forms an inner throat 53 for entry into the inner compartment 6. The walls of the inner compartment 6 are mounted on the inner spider ring 52 in annular grooves 26 into which the material is pressed by circular clamping rings 25. In assembled arrangement, the inner spider ring 52 has a narrowed neck portion 54 near the upper part of the inner throat 53 as shown in FIGURE 6. Extending diametrically across the bottom of the inner spider ring 52 is a mounting bar or rod 55 for mounting a compressed air container 56 positioned substantially concentric to said inner and outer spider rings21 and 52.

The compressed air container 56 includes an inflation valve 57 at the top for introducing compressed air therein. At the bottom of the compressed air container 55 is a downwardly extending neck 58 having a circular opening 59 therethrough, which extends through a circular opening 60 in the mounting bar 55. This arrangement is best shown in FIGURE 11. The container 56 is held in its mounted position by a snap ring 61 which fits in an annular groove 62 in the neck 58. Attached to the lower portion of the neck 58 which protrudes below the mounting bar 55, is a flexible rubber hose 63 which fits snugly around the protruding portion of the neck 57 The hose 63 is held tightly in position by an adjustable hose clamp 64 of conventional type. The neck 5% and hose 63 form part of an air conduit arrangement, hereinafter described in greater detail, for releasing compressed air in the closure.

Mounted on the side wall of the container 56 is an annular pneumatic bag 65 of a flexible rubber fabric material. The bag is preferably formed from a continuous rubber sleeve having circular wire beads 66 and 67 imbedded therein at each end. In assembled relation the beads fit tightly against the outer wall of the compressed air container as shown in FIGURE 6 forming an air tight seal.

The bead 66 is held in position as best shown in FIG- URE 10, by a circular ring 63 which prevents the bead from moving off of the compressed air container 56. The ring 68 is in turn held on the container 56 by a snap ring 69 which fits in an annular groove 70 in the wall of the container 56. The walls of the container 56 have circular openings 71 therethrough for introducing compressed air from the container into the inner pneumatic bag 65. When inflated the inner bag 65 expands outwardly so that the outer walls of the bag engage the narrow neck portion 54 of the inner spider ring 52 thus sealing the inner throat 53. In deflated condition as shown in dot-dash lines in FIGURE 6 the bag 65 is collapsed to permit access through the inner throat 53 into the inner compartment 6.

Attached to the outer wall of the inner spider ring 52 is an annular outer pneumatic bag 72 of a flexible rubber coated fabric material. The bag is preferably formed from a continuous rubber sleeve having circular wire beads 73 and 74 irnbedded in each end.

In assembled relation, the beads 73 and 74 fit tightly against the outer wall of the inner spider ring 52, forming an air tight seal. The bead 73 fits in an annular groove 75 in the narrow neck portion 54 of the inner spider ring 52. The bead 74 fits in an annular groove 76 in the inner spider ring 52 as best shown in FIGURE 12, and is retained in position by a circular retaining ring 77. The retaining ring 77 is bolted to the inner spider ring 52 by machine screws 78 which engage threaded openings in the ring 52. A wire bead 79 is mounted in the retaining ring 77 to provide a rigid circular form for the retaining ring and to firmly retain the head 74 in the groove 76.

When inflated the outer pneumatic bag expands outwardly and engages the outer spider ring 21, thus providing an air tight seal for the outer throat 17 as shown in FIGURE 6. When deflated, the walls of the bag 72 collapse to the position shown in dot-dash lines in FIG- URE 6 and provide an access through the outer throat 17 into the outer compartment 7.

Located in the outer frame ring 88 is a pressure relief valve 80 shown in detail in FIGURES 7, 8 and 9. The internal portion of the valve is connected to a steel tube 81 extending from the frame ring 88 through an opening 82 in the inner spider ring 52 into the inner throat 24 as shown in FIGURE 6. The tube 81 is welded in the opening 82 to provide a seal between the inner spider ring 52 and the tube 81. The flexible hose 63 connects the steel tube with the neck portion 60 of the compressed air receiving container thus providing an air passage from the valve 80 to the container 56. A hose clamp 83 of conventional type fastens the hose tightly to the tube 81.

A joint 84 in the tube 81 provides an air passage into the outer pneumatic bag 72 as shown in FIGURE 6. A short length of flexible hose 85 is connected at the joint 84 and extends to a bent length of tube 86. The tube 86 is welded in a circular opening 87 in the inner frame ring 52 thus providing an air passage from the compressed air container 56 into the outer pneumatic bag 72 for inflating the bag 72 simultaneously with the inner pneumatic bag 65.

In assembled relation, the valve is recessed below the top of the frame ring 88 and within a protected chamber 89 formed therein to prevent accidental activation of the valve release pin 96. The valve 80 is of the one shot type and once opened will hold the valve in the open position until manually repositioned.

FIGURE 7 shows the valve 89 in its closed position wherein a rubber grommet 91 sealingly engages an inturned circular flange 92 on the base 93 of the valve. To release the valve, a socket wrench of the proper size is placed on the hexagonal valve pin and rotated until the grommet 91 disengages from the inturned flange 92. The valve spring which is depressed in the valve closed position then pushes the pin 9% and the grommet 91 upward to the position shown in FIGURE 9 and releases the compressed air in the pneumatic bags.

This arrangement affords a more convenient method for deflating the pneumatic bags and emptying the ingredients for mixing. When the bag is turned upside down the release valve may be operated without having to reach under the closure to the compressed air container 56 as would be necessary in the embodiment shown in FIGURES 2 and 5.

It will be unde stood that the above description is by way of illustration rather than limitation and that variations and modifications of the specific device herein shown and described may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A pneumatic closure device for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle with an inner compartment and an outer compartment, comprising a frame assembly forming an outer throat for entry into said outer compartment and an inner throat within said outer throat for entry to said inner compartment, said frame assembly having a rigid compressed air receiving container located within said inner throat; an inflatable outer pneumatic bag of rubber coated material mounted within said outer throat and arranged to expand within said outer throat when inflated to seal said outer compartment; an inflatable inner pneumatic bag mounted on said container within said inner throat and arranged to expand within said inner throat when inflated to seal said inner compartment; means cooperating with said compressed air receiving container for inflating said bags.

2. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said inflating means comprises an air conduit communicating from said air container with said inner pneumatic bag, an air conduit communicating from said compressed air container with said outer pneumatic bag and valve means located in said compressed air container for introducing com pressed air into said container and said inner and outer pneumatic bags.

3. A device as defined in claim 1 wherein said control means comprises a valve means mounted in said frame external to said outer throat and communicating with said inner pneumatic bag, a first air conduit extending from said valve to said container, a second air conduit communicating from said first air conduit with said outer pneumatic bag.

4. A pneumatic closure device for a multicompartment concrete mix receptacle with an inner compartment and an outer compartment, comprising a frame assembly having a continuous rigid outer wall forming an outer throat for entry into said outer compartment and a continuous rigid inner wall forming an inner throat for entry into said inner compartment, said frame assembly having a post mounted within said inner throat; an annular inflatable inner pneumatic bag mounted on said post within said inner throat and arranged to exp-and within said inner throat when inflated to seal said inner compartment and to collapse when deflated to provide entry into said inner compartment; an annular inflatable outer pneumatic bag mounted within said outer throat and arranged to expand within said outer throat when inflated to seal said outer compartment and to collapse when deflated to provide entry into said outer compartment and means for inflating said bags.

5. A device as defined in claim 4 wherein said inflating means comprises a compressed air receiving container mounted within said inner throat, an air conduit communicating from said air container with said inner pneumatic bag, an air conduit communicating from said compresse air container with said outer pneumatic bag and valve means located in said compressed air container for introducing compressed air into said container and said inner and outer pneumatic bags.

6. A device as defined in claim 4 wherein said inflating means comprises a valve means mounted in said frame external to said outer throat, a compressed air receiving container, mounted within said inner throat and communicating with said inner pneumatic bag, a first air conduit extending from said valve to said container and a second air conduit communicating from said first air conduit with said outer pneumatic bag.

7. In combination, a multicompartrnent concrete mix receptacle formed of flexi le rubber coated fabric material and having an inner compartment and an outer compartment, and a pneumatic closure for said receptacle comprising a frame assembly forming an outer throat for entry into said outer compartment and an inner throat within said outer throat for entry to said inner compartment, said frame assembly having a rigid compressed air receiving container located within said inner throat; an inflatable outer pneumatic bag of rubber coated material mounted within said outer throat and arranged to expand within said outer throat when inflated to seal said outer compartment; an inflatable inner pneumatic bag mounted Within said inner throat and arranged to expand within said inner throat when inflated to seal said inner compartment; means cooperating with said compressed air receiving container for inflating said bags.

8. A combination as defined in claim 7 wherein said inflating means comprises an air conduit communicating from said air container with said inner pneumatic bag, an air conduit communicating from said compressed air container with said outer pneumatic bag and valve means located in said compressed air container for introducing compressed air into said containers and said inner and outer pneumatic bags,

9. A combination as defined in claim 7 wherein said inflating means comprises a valve means mounted in said frame external to said outer throat, a compressed air receiving container mounted within said inner throat and communicating with said inner pneumatic bag, a first air conduit extending from said valve to said container and a second air conduit communicating from said first. air conduit With said outer pneumatic bag.

10. A pneumatic closure of the type herein described comprising a frame forming an outer throat and an inner throat Within said outer throat, an inflatable Pneumatic bag mounted within said outer throat and arranged to seal said outer throat when-inflated, an inflatable pneumatic bag mounted within said inner throat and arranged to seal said inner throat when inflated, a compressed air container mounted on said frame, an air conduit communicating from said compressed air container with said inner pneumatic bag, an air conduit communicating from said compressed air container with said outer pneumatic bag and valve means located in said compressed air container for introducing compressed air into said inner and outer pneumatic bags.

11. A pneumatic closure comprising a frame forming an outer throat and an inner throat within said outer throat, an inflatable pneumatic bag mounted within said outer throat and arranged to seal said outer throat when inflated, an inflatable pneumatic bag, mounted within said inner throat and arranged to seal said inner throat when inflated, a valve mounted in said frame external to said outer throat, a compressed air container mounted within said inner throat and communicating with said inner pneumatic bag, a first airconduit extending from said valve to said container and a second air conduit communicating from said first air conduit with said outer pneumatic bag.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,683,336 Cummings Sept. 4, 1928 2,697,534 Topley Dec. 21, 1954 3,028,898 Gooding Apr. 10, 1962 OTHER REFERENCES

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1683336 *Oct 22, 1927Sep 4, 1928Patrick Cummings ThomasPlumbing device
US2697534 *Sep 11, 1950Dec 21, 1954John R Evans & CompanyClosure for tanning drums
US3028898 *Dec 8, 1959Apr 10, 1962Western Velo & Cement SpecialtBulk sacks
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3285308 *Feb 6, 1964Nov 15, 1966Gen Tire & Rubber CoPneumatic closure
US3315699 *Oct 9, 1963Apr 25, 1967Gen Tire & Rubber CoAir valve
US3331526 *Jul 20, 1964Jul 18, 1967Levenson Leonard LionelUltrahigh vacuum seal
US3949901 *Feb 6, 1975Apr 13, 1976National Marineplastic, Ltd.Shipping bag
US7207717 *Nov 7, 2005Apr 24, 2007Mark SteelePackage having a fluid actuated closure
US7883268 *Apr 20, 2007Feb 8, 2011Mark SteelePackage having a fluid actuated closure
US7972063 *Feb 20, 2007Jul 5, 2011Quarter Moon Properties, LLCInflatable beverage insulator
US8613547May 7, 2008Dec 24, 2013Mark SteelePackages having bubble-shaped closures
US20120006702 *Jun 15, 2011Jan 12, 2012Mark SteeleMulti-Compartment Flexible Package
CN101107175BNov 7, 2005Nov 2, 2011马克斯蒂尔Package having a fluid actuated closure
WO2006052800A2 *Nov 7, 2005May 18, 2006Mark SteelePackage having a fluid actuated closure
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/568, 383/42, 383/3, 220/239
International ClassificationB65D88/16, F16J13/00, F16K7/10, B65D88/00, F16K7/00, B28C7/00
Cooperative ClassificationF16J13/00, B65D88/1643, B28C7/0076, F16K7/10
European ClassificationF16J13/00, B28C7/00B1D, F16K7/10, B65D88/16F6