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Publication numberUS3151765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1964
Filing dateJan 21, 1963
Priority dateJan 21, 1963
Publication numberUS 3151765 A, US 3151765A, US-A-3151765, US3151765 A, US3151765A
InventorsGriese Jr Elmer W
Original AssigneeEkco Containers Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Re-closable hermetically sealed container
US 3151765 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1964 E. w. GRIESE, JR 3,151,765

RE-CLOSABLE HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1965 4 Sheets-Sheet l @15 A; 195 EH! H Him Oct. 6, 1964 E. w. GRIESE, JR 3,151,765

RE-CLOSABLE HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 I 23F 27F flz/eizf r 44 g ZmerW 67616, ,M

Oct. 6, 1964 E. w. GRIESE, JR 3,151,765

RE-CLOSABLE HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINER Elmer W (irz 656,!fi?

1954 E w. GRIESE, JR 3,151,765

RECLOSABLE HERMETICALLY SEALED CONTAINER Filed Jan. 21, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 United States Patent 3,151,755 RE-CLGSAEIJE HERMETHIALLY SEALED CQNIAIWER Elmer W. Griese, n, Chicago, Iii assignor to Ekco Containers, Inc, a corporation of Illinois Filed Jan. 21, 1963, Ser. No. 252,995 29 Ciairns. {CL 220-433) This appiication is a continuation-in-part of my colagrgging application Serial No. 212,931, filed July 27,

This invention relates to hermetically sealed containers such as conventional double seamed key-opening cans that are adapted for re-closure after they have been opened.

Containers of the aforesaid character are used for products that require hermetic sealing during shipment and storage and which, after breaking of the hermetic seal, must be capable of being re-closed so that portions of the contents may be removed periodically as required. Containers of the aforesaid character are customarily used in vaccum, gas and processed packaging of food products such as coffee, powdered milk and luncheon meats, and are used for other or non-food products where it is necessary initially to protect the contents from air during long periods of storage.

Re-closable hermetically sealed containers are provided customarily by the use of a tear strip for the top or closure member with the tear strip located in such a relationship that after the hermetic seal has been broken, there is a relationship of the cover and the can that enable the cover to be put back in place to protect the unused portion of the contents of the can. The tear strip is generally removed by a wire key that is usually soldered to one of the walls of the can. In most tear strip or key-opening cans that are intended to be re-closable, the necessary structure for facilitating such re-closure is provided by having a double wall near the upper edge of the side wall of the can, and the outer one of these wall portions is double seamed to the can top and includes the tear strip material. Thus, when the narrow tear strip has been removed in the opening of the package, the cover has a depending flange that will surround the upper edge of the inner wall, thus to enable the cover to be put back in place after a portion of the contents have been removed.

The use of such a tear strip construction has been considered to be objectionable because this construction, which includes a wire key, is relatively costly, and be cause opening of the can by removal of the tear strip is considered by many users to be hazardous and diificult. A related objection is found because of the sharp edges that are formed on the lower edge of the depending flange that is left in association with the cover.

In view of the foregoing it is the primary object of the present invention to provide a new and improved reclosable hermetically sealed container or can. A further and related object is to provide such an improved container that may be readily and easily opened, and which may be readily re-closed after a portion of the contents have been removed.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a re-closable hermetically sealed can in such a way as to eliminate the key-type opening device and avoid the hazards involved in the sharp torn edges of the kind that are produced in key opened tear strip cans.

Another important object of the present invention is to provide such a re-closable hermetically sealed container that may be used in association with an ordinary or single thickness can-body or Wall, and a further and related object is to provide a can top which in itself provides all of the structural means required for enabling the can to be hermetically sealed, and for enabling the 3,151,765. Patented Oct. 6, 1964 ice can to be easily opened and readily re-closed. A related object is to provide such a can top that may be put in position on an ordinary can wall through the use of ordinary can closing machinery.

Further objects that are basically economical in character are to provide such a can top which when used with a conventional single wall can body, provides a completed reclosable hermetically sealed can which is more economical than the key-opened containers heretofore employed, to provide such a can top which by reason of its novel construction provides not only for ready opening and reclosure but also provides a large unbroken or unobstructed upper surface upon which graphic material, display advertising and the like may be printed so as to enhance the merchandising effectiveness of the package or container, and to accomplish this in such a way that the upper portion of the can side wall which heretofore embodied the tear strip is made available for graphic display.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims, and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which by way of illustration, show preferred embodiments of the present invention and the principles thereof, and what is now considered to be the best mode in which to apply these principles. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principles may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a re-closable hermetically sealed container embodying the features of the invention, the cover being illustrated in its original hermetically sealed relationship;

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 and illustrating the cover in an open position;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken in vertical plan substantially along the line 3-3 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 and showing the cover of the container in an open relationship, the View being taken substantially along the line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged fragmental vertical sectional view taken substantially along the line 5-5 of FIG. 3;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of the structure shown in FIGS. 1 to 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged portion of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7A is an enlarged view similar to FIG. 7 and showing the cover made from an impervious plastic sheet and showing the adhesive sealing material applied originally to the metal cross wall of the can top;

FIG. 8 is a top and plan view of a can top embodying an alternative from of the invention;

FIG. 9 is a bottom plan view of the cover of FIG. 8 showing the pattern printing adhesive sealant material on the bottom of the cover;

FIG. 10 is an enlarged cross sectional View taken substantially along the line 10-40 of FIG. 8;

FIG. 11 is a view similar to FIG. 10 and illustrating another alternative embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 12 is a fragmental top plan view illustrating another form of tab arrangement for lifting or opening the cover;

FIG. 13 is an enlarged fragmental cross sectional view taken substantially along the line 1313 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a view similar to FIG. 13 and showing the tab structure in a raised position;

FIG. 15 is a plan view of a can top illustrating an alternative form of tab structure, the tab being shown in a raised relationship that occupies the opening of the cover;

FIG. 16 is an enlarged cross sectional view of a por- :3 tion of FIG. 15 showing the tab in its normal position that it occupies during shipment and storage;

FIG. 17 is a plan view of a can top embodying an alternative embodiment of retaining meansfor holding the cover in its re-closed position;

FIG. 18 is an enlarged cross sectional view taken substantially along the line 18-18 of FIG. 17 and showing further details of the retaining means;

FIG. 19 is a cross sectional view taken substantially along the line 19-19 of FIG. 18 and showing the retaining element that is formed on the central or pull-out section of the metal cross wall of the can top; and

, FIG. 20 is a fragmental top plan View of a can top showing the retaining means of FIGS. 17 to 19 as applied to can top structures such as those shown in FIGS. 8 to 11.

For purposes of disclosure the invention is herein illustrated as embodied in a re-closable hermetically sealed container in the form of a can 26 having the usual impervious side wall 21 and impervious bottom wall 22 double seamed together in an air-tight relationship, and on the upper edge of the conventional side wall 21, a can top 25 is conventionally seamed to the side wall to define the usual double seam or chine 26 of a sanitary can or packer, the top 25 having a multi-layer cross wall 125 extended between and connected to the lower inner portions of the chine 26, as will be described. The cross wall 125 includes an impervious cover 27 that, in its original relationship, forms a fixed part of the top 25 and is in hermetically sealed relationship to the lower portion of the chine 26, as will be described, and this cover 27 may be readily and easily lifted by means of a tab 28 at one edge thereof so as to pivot about a pivotal axislocated near the opposite edge of the cover 27 to break the hermetic seal and thereby open the container 20, as illustrated'in FIG. 2 of the drawings. Then, after the desired portion of the contents of the container 20 have been removed, the cover 27 may be pivoted back to its closing position wherein it is releasably held'by latching or retaining means as will be described.

The can top 25 of this invention is manufactured independently of the main can body, as is customary, and is put in place and sealed to the side wall 21 of the can body by conventional can closing machinery so that vacuum, gas or other standard systems of packing may be employed in the usual way. Thus the can top 25 is made from the usual can stock which may be tin plated sheet steel, or may be aluminum or other suitable material, and in many of its physical characteristics is identical with the usual can top. Thus, the sheet metal stock of the can top 25 is formed with a cross wall 39 which has certain elements of specialized form which will be described, but this cross wall 30 has an upstanding cylindrical flange 31, and an outwardly extending flange 32 and a narrow downwardly extending flange 33 that are shown in dotted outline in FIG. 3 in their original relation before seaming of the top 25 to a can body. On the lower face of the flange 32 a layer of resilient sealing material 34 is provided in accordance with common prac tice. The elements 32, 33 and 34 are adapted to be bent downwardly from the dotted line position shown in FIG. 3 and formed into a conventional double seam, and in this operation by conventional equipment, the chine 26 is formed.

The cross wall 30 is, under the present invention, formed with a central cut-out or pull-out section 130 and this is done by forming a series of slits 35,36, 37 and 38 in an end to end relationship, FIG. 6, with supporting webs 39 between the slits 36 and 37 and between the slits 37 and 38. Thus, the slit 35 is relatively long and is formed as a circle concentric with and spaced a short distance inwardly from the upstanding portion 31 of the chine 26, and at its opposite ends the slit 35 meets the slits 36 and 38 respectively. The slits 36 and 38 are aligned and the slit 37 is located between the slits 36 and 38, as will be evident in FIG. 6. The slits 36, 37 and 38, in effect, define a pivot line upon which the pivotal movement of the cover 27 is substantially centered as will be described, this pivot line being drawn along a chord with respect to the central axis of the cover 27. The spacing of the pivotal axis from the adjacent portion of the Wall 31 may of course be varied. The Wall 30 has thus been divided into the central cut-out or pull-out section and a bordering shelf or ledge portion, most of which is relatively narrow and is identified in FIGS. 2, 3, 4 and 5 as a ledge portion 230, and the portion of the wall 30 between the pivot line and the ad- 'jacent portion of the wall 31 is defined as a ledge 330, FIGS. 3, 4 and 7, which serves to anchor the cover 27 for pivotal opening and closing movement.

The cover 27 is put in place on and is adhesively attached and sealed to opposed portions of the cross Wall 30 in a particular manner and relationship, as will be described. Thus, with the structure thus far described, it will be apparent that the slits 35 to 37 would normally allow passage of air through the wall 30, but under the present invention the cover 27 is so constructed as to provide a moisture and air barrier, and the adhesive attachment of the cover 27 to the bordering ledges 236 and 330 and the pull-out portion 130 of the cross wall 30 provides a complete hermetic barrier against moisture and air across the top 25.

In accomplishing the foregoing, the desired impervious characteristic of the cover 27 may be attained through theuse of different materials or combinations thereof, and the adhesive required to seal and secure the cover 27 in place may be applied to and carried by either the cover 27 or the opposed portions of the cross wall 30. Moreover, the adhesive may be applied either as continuous coating or in a pattern, as will become apparent, and where the adhesive is pattern printed, the pattern should be such that the adhesive will extend transversely across the slits such as the slits 35 to 37 so as to form the desired hermetic seal and contribute to the strength of the cover structure.

Thus in the specific form of the invention illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 7 the cover 27 is made from a cardboardmetal foil laminate and on the foil side of the laminate material an adhesive coating is provided whereby the cover material may be hermetically sealed and adhered to the center and ledge portions of the cross wall 30. As will be evident in FIGS. 5 and 7, the cover stock is provided in this instance by a relatively dense and still cardboard layer 40 that is adhered by means of an adhesive layer 41 to a metal foil layer 43, and on the lower side of the foil layer, an adhesive layer 44 is applied as a coating. This adhesive 44 is preferably of the hot melt type that is activated by heat and pressure.

The cardboard-foil laminate stock that is employed in this embodiment of the invention is cut to an outside shape and diameter such that it Will fitinto the space over the cross wall 30, and the preferred arrangement is such that the edges of the cover will fit snugly against the side wall 31. The cover 27 of course has the tab 28 formed 'at one edge thereof, and preferably this tab 28 is bent back so as to lie flat against the upper surface of the cover, in which position it maybe held by suitable adhesive such as a glue spot 286.

The cover 27 has a fold line 227 formed therein by the usual scoring process so asto facilitate pivotal movement of the cover 27 to and from its open position of FIG. 2. Also, it is noted that the metal webs 39 in the cross wall 30 are formed merely by leaving a space between the ends of the adjacent slits. This spacing determines the strength of such webs 3?, and it has been found that with ordinary can stock two webs 39 of ab out inch width will serve to hold the pull-out portion 130 in position during assembly of the top 25, and yet may be readily broken when the cover 27 is first lifted to its open position.

When the seal of the container is broken by lifting of the tab 28, the hermetic seal is first broken be tween the cover 27 and the ledge 23% directly beneath the tab 28, and the adhesive bond is then progressively broken about the edge of the cover until the cover 27 is released up to the fold line 227. During this release of the cover 27, the pull-out section 13% moves with the cover 27 and is bent upwardly about the axis defined by the webs 139, and the cover 27 is thus opened while allowing an anchoring portion 327, FIG. 3, of the cover to remain in its adhesively secured relationship vith respect to the ledge 33%). Thus the way in which the seal is broken serves to assure that the cover 27 will be left in a pivotal relationship on and with respect to the container 26.

As above pointed out, the cover 27 may be returned to its closed relationship, and means are provided for releasably retaining the cover in its closed position. Thus, in the embodiment shown in FIGS. 1 to 6 of the drawings, the vertical wall 31 is bent inwardly at selected points to provide inwardly projecting retaining lugs 431. These lugs 431 in the present instance are provided at four locations as will be evident in FIG. 6 of the drawings, and these locations are spaced considerably from the pivotal axis of the fold line 227.

It will be noted that the two lugs 431 that are closest to the tab 28 face generally toward the pivotal axis of the cover 27, and this relationship causes the lugs to be particularly efiective. This result arises from the fact that after the cover 27 has been opened and is being re-closed, there is an inherent tendency of the cover to be moved for a slight distance in the direction of the tab 28. It is not clear just why this tendency is created, and it may possibly be due to the action of the fold line structure 227, or to the irregularities of the metal edges that are formed when the webs 39 are broken, or it may be due to a combination of these factors. Nevertheless this tendency has been noted, and the location of the lugs 431 facing toward the fold line enables the inherent forward displacement of the cover structure to assure a better holding action with respect to the cover upon re-closure thereof.

Hence, when the cover 27 is returned to its closed position, the projecting border portions of the cover stock move into position above the ledge 23% and the edges of the cover 27 move down past and beneath the several retaining lugs 431, the cardboard material of the cover 27 being suficiently resilient to allow this action to take place for a substantial number of times without impairing the retaining relationship that is established between the cover 27 and the several retaining lugs 431. The top 25, being made from conventional can stock material assures rigidity in the cut-out or pull-out portion 13-3, and since the section 136 and the cover 27 are adhesively secured together up to the edges of the portion 136, the strength and rigidity of the portion 139 contributes to the strength of the cover 27 so that many opening and closing operations may be performed with respect to the cover.

It has been pointed out that the cover 27 is imperforate, and in the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 to 7, this imperforate characteristic has been provided by a lower metal fold layer 42 that forms a part of a cardboard-foil laminate. Such an imperforate characteristic may, however, be provided by other materials, and in FIG. 7A of the drawings an alternative embodiment of the invention is shown wherein the cover stock is provided by an imperforate sheet of plastic material that is identified as a cover 271 and which has a fold line 227? in position to be located over the webs 39 and the associated slit lines of the cross wall 359 of the can top. In this embodiment of the invention the adhesive 44 is illustrated as being initially applied to the metal cross wall 30 of the can top, and the adhesive is extended across the slit lines so as to be located on the ledges such as the segmentally shaped ledge 33d and on the pull-out portion 13% of the cross wall 36. In all other respects the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 7A is the same as in the embodiment hereinbefore described, it being noted of course that in the final assembly of the can top, the impervious plastic cover 227? is pressed downwardly upon the adhesive layer 4 so as to adhere to the cross wall in the sealed relationship hereinbefore described.

in FIGS. 8, 9 and 10 of the drawings another alternative embodiment of the invention is illustrated, and this embodiment differs from the previously described embodiments primarily in the use of pattern printing of the adhesive, the provision of a larger tab and a different form or shape of the top opening in the cross wall of the can top. Thus in FIGS. 8 to 10, a can top is provided having the same general flange formation about its edges and having a cross wall 3% that has a pull-out portion 13% provided therein. The pull-out portion in the present instance is generally sirnilar in form in that it is defined by slits 36, 37 and 33 with intermediate webs 39, as described in detail hereinbefore, and further portions of the pull-out portion 13-19 are defined by a pair of arcuate slit lines that extend respectively from the slit lines 36 and 38, and at their opposite ends meet with the ends of a straight slit line 1353 that is parallel to the slit line 37 so as to be disposed in the location of a chord. The .cross wall 30 has a cover 3.27 secured in position thereon so that throughout most of its periphery it snugly engages the vertical inner wall 131 of the can top 125, but in this instance where the slit line 1355 is provided, a portion of the cover structure 127 that covers part of the area between the slit line 1358 and the adjacent portions of the wall 131 is utilized in providing a relatively large tab 128.

As will be evident particularly in FIG. 10 of the drawings, this tab 328 is arranged to overlie a sloping segmental portion 1313 that extends downwardly from a short wall section 131W, there being an inside shoulder 131A as shown in FIG. 10 which may be engaged by the back-up portion of the can seaming machinery.

The cover 127 may be made of a double layer impervious stock which is not shown in detail in FIG. 10, but which may be of the character illustrated for example in FIG. 3 of the drawings. This cover stock has a fold line 327F formed therein so as to overlie the slits 36 to 38, and another fold line 3271" is provided substantially outwardly of the slit 1355 so as to define the adjacent edge of the tab 128.

The cover 127 is in this instance secured to the cross wall 349 through the use of adhesive 144 that is printed in a particular pattern as indicated in FIG. 9 of the drawings. in FIG. 9, the lower face of the cover 127 is shown, and the location of the several slit lines 36, 37, 38, 135 and 1355 has been indicated in order that the nature and extent of the printed adhesive pattern may be better understood and described. Thus, it will be evident that the portion of the cover that is to be disposed over the segmental mounting ledge 23!) is entirely covered with adhesive 144 and that this adhesive extends across the location of the slit lines 36 to 38 so that the bonding of the cover to the portions of the cross walls will be continuous transversely across the several slit lines. The same manner of distribution of adhesive is followed with respect to the portions of the cover that are to engage the ledge portions of the wall 39 adjacent the other slit lines and the arrangement is such that the adhesive bridges the location of the slit lines in every instance, and a continuous band of adhesive is provided entirely about the outer edge of the pull-out portion 13% and about the several ledges. Hence when the cover 127 is put in place and the adhesive is activated, the cover is secured in place across the cross wall 36 so as to provide an adhesive seal that is hermetic in character. The tab 128 is not secured adhesively to the sloping portion 1315 so that the outer edge of this portion may be readily engaged by the users finger, or a suitable tool such as a knife, to lift the tab to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 10 where the tab may be firmly grasped to open the cover 127. The opening action is the same as hereinbefore described, and when the cover is to be re-closed, it is engaged and held in its closed position by the action of lugs 431 that are constructed and located as described hereinbefore with respect to the other embodiment of the invention. It should be noted that near the remote ends of the slit lines 36 and 38 the cover 127 is notched at 127N so as to avoid dragging of the edges of the cover against the chine when the cover is opened. These notches do not extend to the fold lines 135, and thus the hermetic seal is attained as in the other forms of the invention.

In FIG. 11 of the drawings a further embodiment of the invention is illustrated which in almost all respects is like the embodiment shown in FIGS. 8 to 10. The difference here lies in the fact that the wall 3% lies in a common plane throughout its entire area so that a relatively wide flat ledge 231 is provided against which the tab 128 may bear. The cover 127 in this instance is secured to the cross wall as hereinbefore described, the tab 128 being free with respect to the ledge 231 so that it may be lifted to an upwardly extending position when the cover 127 is to be initially opened. In almost all respects the embodiment of FIG. 11 is like that described in FIG. 8 of the drawings.

In FIGS. 12 to 14 of the drawings, another alternative embodiment of the invention is illustrated, and this embodiment of the invention involves the use of pattern printed adhesive and the provision of a dilferent form of tab for opening the can. Thus in the embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 12 to 14, a cover 227 is shown in position on a can top 225, the cover 227 being an impervious multiple layer member that is secured by pattern printed adhesive 144 on a cross wall 38 that has a pullout portion 130 that has a form substantially like that shown in FIG. 8 of the drawings. In this instance, the cover 227 has a tab structure 228 that is provided by a separable portion 26% of the cover 227, and a plastic tape 261 that is connected to the section 260 and which extends downwardly about the edge and underneath the edge of the cover 227, this portion 261B being adhered to the bottom surface of the cover so that the tape 261 may be utilized to lift the cover from its initial sealed rela tionship to the cross wall 30 of the top. The removable section 269 of the cover is formed inwardly of the adhesive band that straddles the slit line 1358, as will be evident in FIG. 12, and the portion 264 is defined by a relatively wide slot 263 cut entirely through the cover 227. This slot 263 forms the inner end of the member 260, and the sides of the portion 260 are defined by tear lines 264 and the other end is defined by a transverse slit 265 that is parallel to the slit 263. The user may project his finger or a suitable knife or the like into the slot 263 to tear the member 269 from the cover 227, and this enables the user to lift the tape 261 to the upwardly extending relation shown in FIG. 14. The user may then pull the tape 261 upwardly so as to cause opening of the cover 227 in the general manner hereinbefore described. It may be pointed out that it is possible to cut the slot 263 entirely through the cover 227 because this slot is located inwardly from the seal that is provided by the adhesive 144.

In FIGS. 15 and 16 of the drawings another embodiment of the invention is illustrated wherein a different tab structure is provided. Thus a can top 325 is provided which has the basic structural form of the can top shown in FIG. 3 of the drawings, the only dilference in the metallic structure of the can top being in the location of two of the retaining lugs 421 as will be pointed out in detail hereinafter.

The can top 325 has an impervious cover of relatively stiff material, this cover being identified as cover 327. The cover 327 is hermetically sealed in position on the cross wall 30 of the can top by pattern printed adhesive 344 as indicated in FIG. 16. The cover 327, however, is provided with a different form of tab 328 that is reversely bent at a fold line 3273 so that it initially lies fiat against the top surface of the cover 327. The tab 328 has a special form in that it is defined by ar cuate edges 328A and a straight edge 3283. The arrangement is such that when the tab 328 is folded down against the top surface of the cover 327, the edges 328A overlie corresponding portions of the outer edge of the cover 327 with the edges 328A snugly engaged with the opposed inner surfaces of the inner chine wall 331. The location of the edge 328B in this instance is indicated by a dot-dash line in FIG. 15 of the drawings, and the reference character 328B is applied to this line. With the tab 328 in its horizontal position, it is engaged and held in position by retaining lugs 431A, these lugs being of the same form as those hereinbefore described, but being displaced upwardly a slight distance so as to compensate for the double thickness of material that must be located beneath the lugs 431A. With this arrangement the user may engage the edge 328B to lift the tab 328 to the dotted line position shown in FIG. 16 of the drawings, and the tab 328 may then be pulled upwardly to open the can in the same manner as hereinbefore described. Upon re-closure of the can the lugs 431 engage the cover 327 near what may be termed the center line of the cover, and the tab-edge of the cover may be retained in place by pushing the same downwardly beneath the lugs 431A and then folding the tab 328 downwardly so that it snaps into position beneath the lugs 431A.

In FIGS. 17, 18 and 19 another alternative embodi ment of the invention is disclosed which utilizes a different form of retaining means for holding the cover in position after re-closure. This embodiment of the invention avoids the use of lugs 431 and 431A and makes use of the displacement of the cover structure to provide a frictional engagement between the edge of the pull-out section and the opposed ledge of the cross wall. Thus as shown in FIGS. 17 to 19, a can top 425 is provided that in most respects is identical with the can top of FIG. 3 and a cover 427 that is impervious in character is secured in place on the cross wall 30 by pattern printed adhesive 444 as indicated in FIG. 18. The cover 427 has a tab 428 that is like the tab shown in FIG. 6 and it will be noted that the inner chine wall 31 is formed without lugs such as lugs 431. The retaining means for holding the cover in position after reclosure are provided in a location adjacent to the tab 428 so that the resilient displacement of the cover structure away from its pivot line and in the direction of the tab will produce a frictional engagement of the opposed edges of the ledge 230 and the pull-out section 130. In the present instance this frictional engagement is made more effective by forming a depressed or downwardly formed lug portion 475 at the edge of the pull-out section that is adjacent the tab 428. This provides a vertical extension of the edge of the pull-out section so that as the cover 427 is re-closed, this vertically extended section of the edge of the pull-out section 130 must slide downwardly along and in frictional contact with the opposed edge of the ledge 230. This produces a frictional retention of the cover 427 in its re-close relation. 7

In FIG. 20 of the drawings an additional embodiment of the invention is provided wherein a frictional retaining means is provided in a can top of the structure shown in FIG. 11 of the drawings. Thus the cover in this instance has a tab 128, and the adjacent edge of the pull-out section is defined by a long straight slit adjacent to the tab 127. In this instance the frictional engagement is provided by a pair of downwardly extending friction lugs 475A which have the same form and act in the same manner as hereinbefore described 9 with respect to the lugs 475 of the embodiment shown in FIGS. 17 to 19.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description that the pull-out portion 130 of the cross wall, by reason of its location and manner of association with the cover and bordering ledges, contributes to the structural strength and ruggedness of the cover and the can while the can remains in its hermetically sealed condition, and contributes also to the attainment of satisfactory functioning of the cover during initially opening thereof and during the subsequent opening and reclosing of the cover. More specifically, it will be observed that the adhesive attachment of the cover to the pull-out section and to the bordering ledges produces a unitary cross wall structure in which the strength or rigidity of the section 13%) acts through the particular adhesive bond and the relationship of the section 130 and the ledges 239 and 33% to cooperate with the cover 27 in resisting inward or outward distention that tends to be induced by vacuum or pressure packing and this same cooperative action serves to distribute and resist blows or loads that may be applied in various ways to the can and the can top. Furthermore, the pull-out section 130 serves during opening of the can to prevent bending or other distortion of the cover 27, and after such opening, the section 13! protects and prevents warping of the cover so that the cover is maintained in the desired flat condition for convenience and effectiveness in reclosure.

It will also be evident that the present invention provides a new and improved re-closable hermetically sealed container or can, and it will be apparent that the improved can that is thus provided may be easily opened, and may be readily re-closed.

It will also be apparent that the can of the present invention eliminates the use of the key-opened tear strip that is conventionally used so as to thereby avoid sharp and dangerous torn metal edges, and that in addition to the convenience and safety thus attained, the can of this invention is also more economical than the tear-strip cans heretofore used.

Over and above the advantages thus set forth, the can of this invention provides a large unbroken area on the cover thereof that is of particular value for printed or graphic material, display advertising and the like. Further space for graphic material is also provided about the upper portion of the side wall in the area usually occupied by the tear strip structure.

Thus while preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated herein, it is to be understood that changes and variations may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a re-closable hermetically sealed package, a can body having an impervious side wall and an impervious top and bottom formed from sheet metal can stock and hermatically seamed together, an impervious top being seamed to and extended across the top of said side wall by a hermetically sealed joint providing a chine with an inner Wall, and said top having a cross wall extended between the lower edges of said inner wall of the chine, said cross wall having a plurality of slits formed therein in successive end to end relation and spaced from said chine to define a continous sealing and supporting ledge formed from said cross wall and rigid with the inner wall of said chine, and said slits further defining a pull-out member supported in position in the plane of said ledge by unbroken webs of material of said cross wall, and an impervious relatively stifi cover fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine and having said lower face thereof secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said ledge in a hermetically sealed relation continuously throughout the entire area of said ledge, and a tab formed on one edge of said cover for breaking the seal of the package and lifting the cover and said pull-out section to an open position.

2. A package according to claim 1 wherein at least two of said slits are rectilinear and are in aligned relation to define a pivot line for the cover.

3. A package according to claim 1 wherein the inner wail of the chine has projecting retaining members at spaced points to releasably hold the cover in closed position.

4. In a re-closabie hermetically sealed package, a can body having a side wall and a top and bottom formed from sheet metal can stock, said side wall and bottom being imperforate and being hermetically sealed together, said top being secured across the top of said side wall by a hermetically seamed joint providing a chine with an inner Wall, and said top having a cross wall extended between the lower edges of said inner wall of the chine, said cross wall having a plurality of aligned slits'including a pair of end slits formed there n spaced from said chine new one side of the top and having their ends spaced to provide intermediate webs in the cross Wall, and said cross wall having another continuous slit formed therein spaced from and generally parallel to said chine and connected at its opposite ends to said end slits, said slits defining a pull-out member supported in position by said webs, and an imperforate cover fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine and having the lower face thereof adhesively secured to said pull-out section and to said cross wall by a continuous band of adhesive across and on both sides of said slits to thereby complete the seal of the package and impart strength to the top assembly, and a tab connected to the edge of said cover remote from said aligned slits for breaking the seal of a package and lifting said pull-out section through a pivoting movement about an axis parallel to said migned slits.

5. in a re-closable hermetically sealed package, can body having a side wail and a top and bottom formed from sheet metal can stock, said side wall and bottom being irnperforate and being hermetically sealed together, said top being secured across the top of said side wall by a hermetically seamed joint providing a chine with an inner Wall, and said top having a cross wall extended between the lower edges of said inner wall of the chine, said cross wall having a plurality of slits formed therein in successive end to end relation and spaced from said chine to define a continuous sealing and supporting ledge formed from said cross wall and rigid with the inner wall of said chine, and said slits further defining a pull-out member having at least one straight edge and supported in position in the plane of said ledge by unbroken webs of material located between adjacent ends of the slits defining said straight edge, and a cover that is relatively stiff and impervious and which is fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine and having its lower face adhesively secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said ledge in a hermetically sealed relation continuously throughout the entire area of said ledge, and a tab connected to the edge of said cover remote from said straight edge for breaking the seal of the package and lifting and pivoting said cover and said pull-out section to an open position.

6. A package according to claim 5 wherein means are provided for releasably holding the cover in its closed position upon re-closure of the package.

7. A package according to claim 5 wherein the cover is formed from a cardboard-metal foil laminate.

8. A package according to claim 5 in which the cover is formed from an imperforate and impervious plastic sheet.

9. In a re-closable hermetically sealed package, a can body having a side wall and a top and bottom formed from sheet metal can stock, said side wall and bottom being imperforate and being hermetically sealed together, said top being secured across the top of said side wall by a hermetically seamed joint providing a cit'ne with an inner wall, and said top having a cross wall extended between the lower edges of said inner wall of the chine, saidcross wall having a plurality of slits formed therein in successive end to end relation and spaced from said chine to define a continumous sealing and supporting ledge formed from said cross wall and rigid with the inner wall of said chine, and said slits further defining a pull-out member having at least one straight edge and supported in position in the plane of said ledge by unbroken webs of material located between adjacent ends of the slits defining said straight edge, and an upper relatively stiff imperforate and impervious member providing a cover fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine and having the lower face thereof adhesively secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said ledge in a hermetically sealed relation continuously throughout the entire periphery of said ledge, said cover having a weakened fold line formed therein over and aligned with said straight edge, and a tab formed on the edge of said cover remote from said straight edge for breaking the seal of the package and lifting and pivoting said cover and said pull-out section to an open position.

10. A package according to claim 9 wherein at least two symmetrically located lugs are provided on said chine and facing generally toward said fold line to engage the edge of the cover to releasably hold the same in closed position.

11. In a top for application to a can body to form a re-closable hermetically sealed package, said top being formed from sheet metal can stock to provide a cross wall with attaching structures about the periphery thereof including an upstanding continuous chine wall and an outwardly projecting flange on said chine wall for seaming the top into position on a can body, said cross wall having a plurality of slits formed therein in successive end to end relation and spaced from said chine wall to define a continuous sealing and supporting ledge formed from said cross wall and rigid with said chine wall, and said slits further defining a pull-out member supported in position in the plane of said ledge by unbroken Webs of the cross Wall material between the spaced ends of certain of said slits, and a relatively stiif cover that is impervious at least in a continuous area that overlies all of said slits and extends substantially beyond said slits on both sides thereof, said cover being fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine wall and being adhesively secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said ledge in a hermetically sealed relation continuously and throughout the entire periphery of said ledge, and a tab formed on one edge of said cover for breaking the seal and lifting the cover and said pull-out section to an open position.

12. A can'top according to claim 11 wherein at least two of side slits are rectilinear and are in aligned relation to define a pivot line for the cover.

13. A can top according to claim 11 wherein means are formed from the metal of the can top for holding the cover in closed position.

14. In a top for application to a can body to form a re-closable hermetically sealed package, said top being formed from sheet metal can stock to provide a cross wall with attaching structures about the periphery thereof including an upstanding continuous chine wall and an outwardly projecting flange on said chine wall for seaming the top into position on a can body, said cross wall having a plurality of slits formed therein in successive end to end relation and spaced from said chine wall to define a continuous inwardly projecting sealing and supporting ledge formed from said cross wall and rigid with said chine wall, and said slits further defining a pull-out member formed from the metal of the cross wall and supported in position in the plane of said ledge by unbroken Webs of cross wall material between spaced ends of certain of said slits, and a cover comprising a relatively stiif impervious member fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine wall and having its lower surface adhesively secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said ledge in a hermetically sealed relation continuously throughout the entire periphery of said ledge, and means connected to one edge of said cover for breaking the seal and lifting the cover and said pull-out section to an open position.

15. In a can top for application to a sanitary can to form a re-closable hermetically sealed package, said top being formed from sheet metal can stock to provide a cross wall with attaching structures about the periphery thereof including an upstanding continuous chine wall and an outwardly projecting flange on said chine wall for seaming the top into position on a can body, said cross wall having a plurality of aligned slits including a pair of end slits formed therein spaced from said chine wall near one side of the top and having their adjacent ends spaced to provide intermediate webs in the cross wall, and said cross wall having another continuous slit formed therein spaced from said chine wall and connected at its opposite ends to said end slits, said slits defining a pull-out member supported in position in the plane of said cross wall by said webs, and a cover that is relatively stiif and which is impervious to moisture and gas, said cover being fitted snugly into the space bordered by said chine wall and having the bottom surface thereof adhesively secured to said pull-out section and adhesively secured to said cross wall outwardly of said slits with a continuous area of sealing extended entirely about the periphery of the pullout section, and atab connected to the edge of said cover remote from said aligned slits for breaking the seal between the cover and the bordering edges of the cross wall and lifting said pull-out section through a pivoting movement about an axis parallel to said aligned slits.

16. A can top according to claim 15 wherein one of the opposed edges of the ledge and said pull-out section is formed with a downwardly struck lug for frictional engagement with the other of the opposed edges to hold said cover in a re-closed position.

17. A can top as defined in claim 16 wherein said tab is segmental in form and, when folded into overlying relation with respect to said cover, has its 'arcuate edge engaging said chine, and wherein retaining lugs are formed on the chine to engage said tab near the ends thereof to hold the cover in a closed position with the tab in said overlying relation.

18. A can top according to claim 16 wherein said cover is formed at least in part from an impervious plastic material.

19. A can top according to claim 16 wherein said cover is made from laminated stock including a lower metal foil sheet.

20. A can top according to claim 16 wherein said cover is made from a cardboard-metal foil laminate.

- References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,069,380 Moore Feb. 2, 1937 7 2,801,039 Arneson July 30, 1957 I 2,870,935 Houghtelling Jan. 27, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2069380 *Jun 7, 1935Feb 2, 1937Humoco CorpContainer
US2801039 *May 11, 1955Jul 30, 1957Fed Paper Board Co IncDisposable container
US2870935 *Jan 27, 1955Jan 27, 1959Suzanne Kaaren BlackmerContainer seal
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3245576 *Feb 12, 1964Apr 12, 1966Ekco Containers IncRe-closable hermetically sealed container
US3251515 *Jun 10, 1964May 17, 1966Continental Can CoContainer closure
US3314569 *Jan 27, 1965Apr 18, 1967Mayer & Co Inc OContainer closure
US3380622 *Dec 15, 1966Apr 30, 1968Procter & GambleMethod and material for hermetically sealing containers
US4564249 *Jan 6, 1984Jan 14, 1986Logsdon Duane DMiniature washing machine box
US7891519 *Jun 1, 2006Feb 22, 2011Daiwa Can CompanyEasy open can lid
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/269
Cooperative ClassificationB65D17/163
European ClassificationB65D17/16B1