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Publication numberUS3151963 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 6, 1964
Filing dateMay 25, 1961
Priority dateMay 25, 1961
Publication numberUS 3151963 A, US 3151963A, US-A-3151963, US3151963 A, US3151963A
InventorsJohn K Cochran
Original AssigneePittsburgh Plate Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for winding glass strands
US 3151963 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN 3,151,963

' APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 a Sheets-Sheet 1 Pg. 1 P15. 2

INVENTOR. Jail/V K. COG/l8! Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN 3,151,953

APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 v 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig. 3

INVENTOR.

' 47 I8 200 231 /64 Jar/v x. woven/v Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN 3,151,963

APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR. JO/l/V 4e. CDC/5664A! ATTOlQ/VE'Y 1954 J. K. COCHRAN 3, 51,

APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. JO/l/V K. CDC/{KM ATTORNEY Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN APPARATUS FOR WINDING cuss STRANDS 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 25, 1961 INVENTOR. JO/l/V K COCA/RAN frag/w Q m m Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR, JO/M/ K cue/r24 4? 7' ORA/EV Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed May 25. 1961 INVENTOR.

JOHN A. Coo/RAN l I J 4 TORNEY Oct. 6, 1964 J. K. COCHRAN 3,151,963

APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS Filed May 25. 1961 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR. Jaw/v K. COCA RAN ATTOPIVE'Y strand is unwound from the tube.

United States Patent 3,151,!!63 APPARATUS FOR WINDING GLASS STRANDS John K. Cochran, Pine Township, Wexford, Pa., assignor to Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed May 25, 1961, Ser. No. 112,632 8 Claims. (Cl. 65-11) The present invention relates to an apparatus for winding strand, and it has particular relation to an apparatus for forming glass fiber strand and winding it on a cylindrical tube.

In one process for forming glass fibers, a plurality of individual fibers are drawn continuously from cones of glass suspended from tips defining orifices in an electrically heated, platinum alloy feeder known as a bushing. The fibers are passed through a gathering guide to group them together in the form of a strand and the strand is wound around a rotating, cylindrical forming tube which is mounted on a rotating cylinder known as a collet. The rotation of the forming tube supplies the drawing force to attenuate and form the individual fibers.

There is no twist in the strand as it is thus formed. A size is applied to the individual fibers prior to the winding of the strand on the forming tube in order to bond them together and maintain the integrity of the strand. An open wind, rather than a parallel wind, is desired in the winding of the strand on the tube. If a parallel wind is used, the individual fibers of one turn of strand tend to bind to the individual fibers of an adjacent turn of strand. These bound fibers from different turns of strand cling to each other and break when the In this event, successive turns of the strand become entangled, and it soon becomes impossible to unwind the strand and remove it from the tube. If an open wind is employed, the turns of strand cross each other at an angle and do not tend to bind to each other. An open wind is therefore preferred.

An open wind is provided to the strand by means of a traverse which is located closely adjacent the forming tube. The traverse may move the strand back and forth through a twoor three-inch throw as it is wound on the forming tube. A much smaller throw, i.e., A to /2 inch, may be employed when a filling wind is desired. The length of the throw can be varied by varying the length of the cams in the traverse.

The process as above described is practiced as a single level and a double level process. In the double level process, the bushing and fiber gathering guide are on one level and the traverse and forming tube are on a floor level below them, and the traverse and fiber gathering guide are quite far apart, for example, about 80 inches apart. In the single level process, the bushing, fiber gathering guide, traverse and winder are all within reach of one operator on one level, and the distance between the traverse and fiber gathering guide is much less than in the double level process, for example, about 35 inches.

It is preferred, particularly in the single level process, to maintain the guide and traverse stationary with respect to each other and reciprocate the forming tube in order to distribute the strand along the length of the forming tube. This is because it is desired that the angle which the strand describes in its passage from the guide to the traverse be kept as small as possible. The reason for this is that as the angle increases, the tension and friction on the strand increases as it passes over the guide. The greater the tension and friction on the strand, the greater the tendency for an individual fiber in the strand to break and thereby break out the whole strand and discontinue the fiber forming operation. If the form- 3,151,963 Patented Oct. 6, 1964 ing tube is axially reciprocated in order to distribute the strand along the length of the forming tube, this permits the angle which the strand makes on its passage from the guide to the traverse to be kept at a minimum and be no more than necessary to permit the throw imparted to the strand by the traverse.

A desideratum of the glass fiber forming art has been to produce larger forming packages on larger forming tubes. This has been desired so that the amount of strand in a forming package is some even multiple of the amount of strand which is unwound from the forming tube, twisted and rewound on a twister tube. This enables the glass fiber yarn producer to supply splice-free yarn to the weavers. It is desired to produce these larger forming packages by means of apparatus which does not take up any more space than winding equipment now being employed, thereby eliminating the necessity to enlarge present production facilities or reduce the number of fiber forming stations within existing production facilities.

In accordance with this invention, apparatus is provided whereby this may be accomplished. This apparatus comprises a cylindrical winding or forming tube, means for rotating the tube, means for continuously reciprocating the tube axially during the winding, a traverse located adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse and means for reciprocating the traverse continuously during the winding in a line parallel to the axis of the tube, the means for reciprocating the tube and the means for reciprocating the traverse being adjusted so that the tube and traverse are reciprocating continuously in opposite directions. The tube reciprocating means and traverse reciprocating means may be independently operated; however, in a preferred embodiment of the invention the traverse reciprocating means is actuated by and is directly responsive to the tube reciprocating means. In a further embodiment of the invention, the fiber gathering guide may be reciprocated with the traverse, preferably in unison therewith.

For a more detailed description of the winding apparatus and its mode of operation in the winding and forming of a glass fiber strand, reference may be made to the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic elevation of a fiber forming apparatus;

FIG. 2 is a side view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an elevation of the winder which forms part of the apparatus illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the winder shown in FIG. 3;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged partial elevation of a portion of the winder shown in FIG. 3 illustrating means for reciprocating the traverse which forms part of the winder;

FIG. 6 is a side view of the traverse reciprocating means shown in FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is a top view of the traverse reciprocating means shown in FIG. 5;

FIGS. 8 and 9 are modified forms of cams which are useful and operable in the traverse reciprocating means shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7;

FIG. 10 is a schematic drawing of the electrical system of the winder;

FIG. 11 is a schematic drawing of the pneumatic system of the winder;

FIG. 12 is an elevation of the means for controlling and varying the axial movement of the forming tube;

FIG. 13 is a plan view of the control means shown in FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a side view of the control means shown in FIG. 12;

FIG. 15 is a diagrammatic elevation, partly in section, of a forming package produced by use of the winding apparatus;

FIGS. 16 and 17 are diagrammatic views of a means for controlling the bushing temperature during the run in response to the control means shown in FIGS. 12, 13 and 14;

FIG. 18 is a diagrammatic view of means for controlling the speed of the collet in response to the control means shown in FIGS. 12, 13 and 14;

FIG. 19 is a view similar to FIG. 2 showing another embodiment of the invention wherein the fiber gathering guide and size applicator are reciprocated in unison with the traverse;

FIG. 20 is an elevation similar to FIG. illustrating a modification of the traverse reciprocating means shown in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7; and

FIG. 21 is a plan view of the modification shown in FIG. 20.

In FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawing, there is shown a glass melting container or forehearth thereof containing a supply of molten glass 16 and having an electrically heated feeder or bushing 18 attached to the bottom of the container. The bushing 18 is trough-like in shape and is provided with a series of orifices 20, which orifices are defined by tips 22 suspended from the bottom portion of the bushing. The bushing is composed of an alloy containing about 90 percent platinum and 10 percent rhodium and is heated by passing through it electric current from a suitable source. The current is received by the bushing from the source by means of terminals or lugs 24 attached to opposite ends of the bushing along the vertical end walls of the bushing.

The molten glass 16 within the bushing is maintained at a temperature suitable for fiberizing by means of heat transferred by conduction from the bushing to the glass contained therein. The molten glass flows through the tips 22 and forms in small cones 25 suspended from the tips. The tips are aligned in four or more rows having a great many tips in each row so that the total number of tips may be about 200 to 400 or more. A smaller or greater number of rows and/or tips may be present in the bushing.

Glass filaments or fibers 26 are pulled from the cones 25 at a very high rate of speed, for example, 5,000 to 20,000 feet per minute, usually about 10,000 to 15,000 feet per minute and wound on a rapidly rotating forming tube 28 mounted on a rotating collet 29. The collet may be approximately 6 to 8 inches in outside diameter and may rotate at approximately 6,000 to 8,000 r.p.m., depending upon the size of the fiber to be produced and other operating conditions such as temperature of the glass in the cones 25. The glass fibers 26 are grouped into a a strand 30 as they pass over a fiber gathering guide 32 prior to being wound on the forming tube 28.

Usually an aqueous size containing a liquid binder and a lubricant, such as a combination of starch and a vegetable oil, is applied to the individual fibers 26 of the strand 30 as they pass over a size applicator 33 which is mounted just above the guide 32. The size transfer surface in the applicator 33 may be in the form of a rotating roller 34 or moving belt having a film of the size applied to it. The fibers 26 pass over the roller or belt at some tangential point for momentary contact with the sizing solution to transfer the solution from the applicator to the fibers. An example of a suitable size applicator is shown in US. Patent No. 2,873,718.

As the strand 30 is wound on the tube, it is given a traversing motion by means of cam 35. The cam 35 is in the form of a cylindrical spindle having a sinusoidal, peripheral groove 38 around its surface. The walls 40 of the groove 38 are sloped inwardly at an angle of about to 90 degrees to the axis of the spindle so as to reciprocate the strand 30 in the axial direction of the cam and collet very rapidly as the cam is rotated rapidly. The amplitude of the traversing movement may vary depending upon the axial distance covered by the high and low points of the sinusoidal groove 38 on the periphery of the cam. The amplitude may be very slight, for example, to /2 inch or it may be much greater, for example, 3 to 5 inches. The frequency of the traversing movement is controlled by the speed at which the cam is rotated and the number of reverses in the direction of the groove 38 as it travels around the periphery of the cam 35. All of these variables can be controlled within the skill of the art. The cam 35 may have a diameter at the bottom of the groove of about 2 inches and a diameter at the top of the groove of about 2 /2 inches and may have about 2 to 8 reversals in the groove. The cam 35 may rotate at about 1,000 to 25,000 rpm. with a cam of the above dimensions with 2 reversals in the groove being preferably rotated at about 18,000 rpm. when the amplitude of the traverse is about /2 inch and about 3,000 rpm. when the amplitude of the traverse is about 3 inches.

The strand is distributed along the length of the forming tube by the relative motion of the forming tube 28 with respect to the cam 35 as created by slowly reciprocating the forming tube and cam continuously in opposite directions during the fiber forming run. With each axial movement of the forming tube with respect to the cam 35, a separate layer is wound on the forming tube so that the forming tube has a plurality of layers of strand wound in superposed relation on the forming tube 28. Each succeeding layer may be substantially the same length as the preceding layer or may be of shorter length than the preceding layer. In the latter case, the end of each succeeding layer terminates short of the end of each preceding layer. Both of such methods of producing a forming package are described hereinafter in greater detail.

The winder, including the cam 35, forming tube 28 and means for providing the reciprocatory movement between the two, is generally indicated at 45 in FIGS. 1 and 2. The winder 45 is shown in greater detail in FIGS. 3 and 4. It is composed of a base 47 and a sheet metal framing enclosure 49 mounted on the base. A carriage 50 is mounted on the base on a pair of lubricated slides 52 which are mounted on supports 53 rigidly fastened to the base. Accordion-like sleeves 55 are attached to the supports 53 and carriage 50 so as to protect the lubricated slides 52 from any dirt or other foreign substances.

The supports 53 act as mechanical stops for the reciprocating straight line motion of the carriage 50 on the slides 52. The carriage 50 is reciprocated by means of a piston rod 57 which is rigidly attached to the carriage 50 at 58 and whose pistons 60 and 61 are mounted respectively in an oil cylinder 63 and air cylinder 64 mounted in tandem. The oil cylinder serves as a dashpot for smoothing out the movement of the pistons 60 and 61 caused by alternating air pressures on opposite sides of piston 61 in the air cylinder 64. Air is supplied to opposite ends of the cylinder 64 by line 65 and 66 which are connected to a four-way, two-position, bleeder actuated, balanced air valve 68. The details of the valve 68 and its method of controlling the air flow to the cylinder 64 are discussed in further detail in conjunction with the description of the operation of the winder 45. The oil in the cylinder 63 passes from one side of the piston 60 to the other side by means of line 67 connected to each end of the cylinder 63.

The drive for the collet 29 is motor 70 which is adjustably mounted on the carriage 50. The collet 29 is mounted on a spindle 72 which is supported in a cylindrical bearing for rotation but limited to movement in an axial direction in an upright portion 75 of the carriage 50. Spindle 72 is rotated by means of a belt 78 which is connected to and driven by the motor 70. The motor 70 is equipped so direct current can be applied to the motor windings to reduce its speed.

The structure of the cam 35 has been discussed above with respect to FIGS. 1 and 2 and its mounting and drive are now discussed in detail with respect to its showing in general in FIGS. 3 and 4 and in detail in FIGS. 5 to 7. A vertical stationary plate 84 is rigidly attached to an upright support 85 mounted on base 47. The plate 84 serves as a fixed support for vertical reciprocating plate 87 which serves as a movable support for the cam 35 and its motor drive 88. The motor 88 is supported on a platform 89 that is mounted on two horizontal rods 90 extending horizontally from and rigidly fastened to the bottom portion of plate 87. The cam 35 extends through two hollow cylindrical bearings 91 in projections 92 extending downwardly from and forming a part of the platform 89. A pair of collars 96 mounted on the cam 35 prevent avial movement of the cam 35 in the bearings 91. The alignment of the cam 35 is such that the axis of the cam is parallel to the axis of the collet spindle 72. The cam 35 is slightly above and to one side of the collet 29 so that it applies a traversing movement to the strand just before, i.e., 3% inches in distance, the strand is deposited on the forming tube. The cam 35 is driven by means of a belt 98 which is connected to and driven by the motor 88.

The cam reciprocates in an axial direction in addition to the rotating movement supplied to the cam 35 by the motor 88. The cam 35 reciprocates in an axial direction which is opposite to the axial reciprocation of the forming tube 28. The driving force for the axial reciprocation of the cam is supplied by the axial reciprocation of the forming tube 28 as provided by the movement of the carriage 50. It is to be understood, of course, that the axial reciprocation of the cam can be independently provided by independent driving means (not shown); however, the method and apparatus for axially reciprocating the cam in response to the movement of the carriage 50 as hereinafter described is preferred since it is a simple and efficient method for accomplishing the axial reciprocating movement of the cam 35.

The apparatus for and the manner of axially reciprocating the cam 35 is now described. A cam 100 in the form of an inclined plane is rigidly but adjustably fastened at about its midpoint upon a bolt 71 that extends through an upright flange 73 of an angle iron 74. The angle iron 74 is adjustable horizontally upon the upper portion 75 of the carriage 50. Slots 76 are formed in the angle iron 74 to receive bolts 77 threaded into the top of the carriage 50 and thereby to provide proper adjustment of the angle iron and the cam carried thereby. This adjustment permits control of the positioning of the end-points of the forming package on the forming tube. An additional bolt 79 disposed in a slot 80 formed in the upright flange 73 is threaded into the cam 100 and provides for adjustment of the cam 100 in various positions about the horizontal bolt 71 in order to vary the slope of the cam and the amount of the extension of the length of the forming package.

As shown in the drawing, the highest point of the inclined plane is toward the front of the winder, i.e., the end where the cam 35 is located. The guiding surface of the inclined plane is aligned with the travel of the carriage 50 so as to provide a continually changing surface to a roller 104 as the carriage 50 moves back and forth. The roller 104 is mounted at the end of a generally horizontal arm 105 of a bell crank lever 106 which is pivotally mounted at 107 to the upright support 85. A generally horizontal connecting rod 108 is pivotally mounted at its one end to the upper end of a generally vertical arm 110 of the bell crank lever 106. The rod 108 is pivotally connected at its other end to the movable support plate 87. It can be seen that as the carriage 50 moves in and out, the roller 104 moves up and down the inclined plane cam 100, and this in turn causes the rod 108 through the bell crank lever 106 to move horizontally out and in the direction of its length, thereby transmitting a reciprocating motion to the plate 87 which is directly opposite to the reciprocating motion of the carriage 50.

The movement of the plate 87 in response to the action of the bell crank lever 106 is accomplished in the following manner. A pair of rollers 112 are mounted for rotation on the back of plate 87 in horizontal alignment with each other so as to ride in a horizontal slot 113 provided in plate 84. The plate 87 is guided on the plate 84 at the top of plate 87 by means of a pair of rollers 115 which are mounted for rotation about vertical axes to a horizontal plate 118 which extends from upright support 85 and is bolted to the top of plate 84. The plate 87 is held away from plate 84 by means of a pair of rollers 120 which are fastened to the bottom of plate 87 for rotation about vertical axes in contact with the exposed face of plate 84 along its bottom edge. The diameter of the rollers 120 is sufficiently larger than the thickness of the plate 87 so that the plate 87 is held a short distance, i.e., ,5 of an inch, away from plate 84.

The plate 87 (and the motor 88 and cam 35 supported by it) are urged inwardly or held to the rear of the winder by means of a horizontal spring which is connected at one end to a support 127 in the form of an eye which is rigidly connected to the plate 87 and is connected at the other end to an upright extension 129 having an opening in it to permit attachment of the end of the spring. The extension 129 is rigidly connected to the upright, movable support 87. As the carriage 50 moves in (towards the rear of the winder), the inclined plane moves the roller 102 up, and through the bell crank lever 106 the connecting rod 108 urges the plate 87 forward (towards the front of the winder) against the retaining action of the spring 125. As the carriage 50 moves out (towards the front of the winder), the spring 125 pulls the plate 87 back to the rear of the winder and the roller 104 moves down the inclined plane. Thus, it can be seen that the reciprocating action of the cam 35 is directly opposite to the reciprocating action of the forming tube 28 and is directly responsive to the reciprocating movement of the forming tube.

As shown in FIG. 2, the cam 35 is mounted so that when the cam is at the midpoint of its travel its groove 38 is in a vertical plane with the guide 32 and the center of the bushing 18, said plane being perpendicular to the axes of the cam 35 and the forming tube 28. The guide 32 is located approximately under the center of the bushing 18, but, as shown in FIG. 1, the axis of the cam groove 38 is offset in the aforementioned vertical plane approximately 10 to 15 degrees from a vertical line drawn through the center of the bushing and the guide 32. This angle is just slightly larger than the angle formed by the outside or end fibers 26 with the vertical line.

The forming tube 28 is mounted below the guide 32. The strand 30 passes over the cam 35 under slight tension as it moves between the guide 32 and the forming tube 28. As shown in FIG. 1, the cam 35 intercepts an imaginary line drawn from the guide 32 to the point on the periphery of the forming tube 28 where the strand first contacts the tube. This positioning of the cam 35 is required so that the cam 35 is able to engage the strand positively and move it back and forth as it is wound upon the forming tube. When the cam 35 is at its midpoint of reciprocating travel, the groove 38 is in line with the midpoint of the forming tube 28 at the midpoint of its reciprocating travel; i.e., the groove 38 and the midpoint of the forming tube are in the same vertical plane when the cam 35 and forming tube 28 are at the midpoint of their reciprocating movement.

The advantage of the reciprocating actions of the cam 35 and the forming tube 28 as above described can best he explained by means of an example. Assume that the Winder is designed and has been built to provide a carriage movement (and forming tube movement) of a maximum of 7 inches, and the throw of the traverse is about /1 inch. This would mean that the maximum length of forming package on the forming tube would be 7 inches. Assume next that a forming package 11 inches long with a strand lay requiring the A inch traverse throw is desired. Theoretically, it would be necessary to increase the maximum length of the carriage reciprocation, and this would require a rebuilding of the winder. In accordance with the present invention, however, the same winder with a longer collet can be employed with the addition of the inclined plane cam 100 so as to provide a reciprocating movement of the cam 35 through a 4-inch stroke, i.e., 2 inches to either side of its central position. Since this reciprocating movement of the cam is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the forming tube as described above, a forming package of 11 /2 inches rather than 7 /2 inches can be produced.

The above conditions of manufacture are exemplary only and it can be understood that the apparatus of the invention can be modified to produce forming packages of various lengths. The addition of the means which provides a reciprocating motion to the cam 35, which motion is oppoiste to the reciprocating motion of the forming tube, provides a versatility to the winder which is not present in any of the winders now employed in the glass fiber art.

Modifications of the inclined plane cam to provide slightly modified operation of the winder are illustrated in FIGS. 8 and 9. Cam 101 is similar to cam 100 except that the forward guide surface 101a which is contacted by the roller 104 during the movement of the collet 29 through the distance a between the innermost reciprocating point and the startup position is horizontal so that the roller 104 has no vertical movement but merely rides on surface 101a without rotating the bell crank lever 106 and moving the cam 35 axially during this portion of the collet's travel. The remaining portion 101i) of the guiding surface of cam 101, which is contacted by roller 104 during the reciprocating movement of the collet 29, has the same slope as cam 100 and provides the same axial reciprocating motion to the cam 35 during the fiber forming run as described above with respect to cam 100.

Cam 102 shown in FIG. 9 is similar to cam 101, however, the slope of the cam surface varies through the distance b representing the reciprocating area of the collet 29 during the fiber forming run. The slope of the cam 102 is greater at each end than it is in the middle of this distance so that axial speed of cam 35 is faster while depositing strand at the ends of the forming package than in the center. This prevents the buildup of ridges at the end of the forming package. Other modi fications of the surface of the cams 100, 101 and 102 can be made to achieve differently shaped forming packages.

The operation of the winder 45 during the glass fiber forming process can best be described in conjunction with the description of the schematic drawing of the electrical system in FIG. 10 and the schematic drawing of the pneumatic system in FIG. 11. In starting the fiber forming process, the operator pulls the strand 30 across the guide 32 and wraps it around the end of the collet 29 which extends beyond the forming tube 28. The collet 29 is at its innermost position at the start of the run. While doing this the operator has his foot on a foot switch 130 having normally closed contacts FS-1 and FS3 and normally open contact FS-2 located in a 120 volt alternating current circuit generally designated 132 in FIG. 10.

Contacts FS-1 and FS-Z are in a circuit in series with a normally closed push-button switch PB1, the primary winding P of a transformer 134, normally closed contact 2M-1 and a coil 1CR of a relay having normally open contacts 1CR1, lCR-2, ICR-3, 1CR-4 and lCR-S. The winding P and contact 2M-1 are in parallel with each other. A normally closed contact 3TR1 is in another circuit in parallel with contact FS1 and in series with push-button PB-l, contact FS2, normally closed contact 4TR-1, normaly open contact ICR-l, primary winding P, contact 2M-1 and coil ICR. The contacts 4TR-1 and 1CR-1 are in series with each other and in 8 parallel with contact FS2. The various contacts PB-l, FS1, FS-2, 3TR-l, lCR-l, 2M-1 and 4TR-1 together with primary winding P form in combination with coil ICR a plurality of circuits through which coil ICR can be energized or deenergized.

Depression of the foot switch by the operator as he starts the winding process opens contacts FS-1 and FS-3 and closes contact FS-Z. Current is then able to flow through the circuit containing contacts PB-l, FS-2, 3TR1, 2M-1 and coil lCR to energize the coil 1CR and close the normally open contacts lCR-l and 1CR-2. When contact ICR-l is closed a holding circuit is completed having in series contacts PB-l, 4TR-1, 1CR1, 3TR1, 2M-1 and coil 1CR to maintain coil 1CR energized upon release of the foot switch 130.

Release of the foot switch 130 closes contacts FS-1 and FS-3. Contact FS-3 is located in another circuit in series with normally open, now closed, contact lCR-2, normally closed contact BC-l and coil 1M of a starter for the collet motor 70. This energizes coil 1M of the starter and starts the collet 70. Coil 1M has normally closed contacts 1M2 and 1M-4 and normally open contacts lM-l and 1M-3. When coil 1M is energized, interlock contact 1M-3 is closed in another circuit to energize a collet oscillating timer lTR and a collet motor braking timer 2TR in parallel with each other and in series with contact 1M-3. The timer lTR, of the on delay type, is set, e.g., for about 4 to 6 seconds to permit the collet motor 70 to attain sufficient speed to rotate the collet at about 7,650 rpm. When 1TR times out, its normally open contact lTR-l closes. The contact lTR-l is in series with normally open contact 1CR-3, now closed, and with a solenoid SV-l of a normally closed, spring biased, solenoid valve 135, timer 3TR of the on delay type and solenoid SV-2 of a normally open solenoid valve 136 in line 67 connected to the oil cylinder 63. The solenoids SV-l and SV-2 and coil 3TR are in parallel with each other. The solenoid valve controls the oscillation of the collet. The timer 3TR, through its normally open contact 3TR-2 of the on delay type, initiates the rotation of the cam 35. The solenoid valve 136 allows slow reciprocation of the collet when it is closed and permits a rapid return of the collet to the home or starting position at the end of the run when it is open.

Energizing of the solenoid SV-l by closing contact lTR-l opens the solenoid valve 135. This opens a portion of the pneumatic system for controlling the oscillation of the collet 29 and permits the collet to move outward from its home position. Also, when contact lTR-l closes, the timer 3TR is energized. The timer 3TR times out and closes the normally open contact 3TR-2 which is in series in another circuit with the coil 2M of the starter for the cam motor 88. The closing of contact 3TR-2 (after a delay of about 1 to 3 seconds) starts the rotation of the cam 35. With this arrangement the cam 35 does not begin to rotate until after the collet comes up to speed and has moved outwardly from the innermost or home position in response to the energization of the solenoid SV-l.

At the same time that the cam motor 88 is started, a synchronous motor timer 4TR is energized. The timer 4TR is in parallel with coil 2M and in series with contact 3TR-2. The timer 4TR is set for the length of the run, for example 10 minutes. At the end of the run timer 4TR times out to close its normally open contact 4TR-2 so that a light L in series with contact 4TR2 in another circuit is lit to indicate to the operator that the run is complete.

Normally closed contact 4TR-1 in series with the lCR holding circuit described above times open at the end of the run and since contact FS-Z is open, the coil 1C R is deenergized. When coil lCR is deenergized, its contact lCR-2 is opened, but this does not deenergize collet motor starter 1M and stop the collet motor because the holding circuit containing limit switch LS-2 and normally open, now closed, contact 1M1 continues to energize the starter 1M.

When coil 1CR is deenergized, its contact 1CR-3 is opened, solenoid SV-l closes and solenoid SV-2 opens to cause the carriage 50 to return rapidly to its innermost position. The solenoid SC-2 opens line 67 to permit oil in cylinder 63 to move rapidly from one side of piston 60 to the other and permit rapid return of the carriage to its home position. When timer 3TR is deenergized, its contacts 3TR-2 are opened and cam motor 88 is stopped. Contacts 3TR-1, which opened after a delay of about 3 seconds when timer 3TR was initially energized is closed when timer 3TR is deenergized and this permits coil 1CR to be energized when the foot switch 130 is depressed.

When the carriage returns to the innermost position, limit switch LS-2 is opened and the holding circuit for the starter 1M is broken. This deenergizes starter 1M which disconnects collet motor 70 from its power lines and closes contacts 1M-2. With the closing of contacts 1M-2, the collet motor brake contactor BC is energized. This applies direct current to the motor windings which dynamically brakes the motor to bring it quickly to a stop. The deenergizing of starter 1M also opens contact 1M-3 which in turn deenergizes timers 1TR and 2TR.

When 2TR was initially energized contact 2TR-1 in series with normally closed contact 1M-2 and brake contact BC was instantaneously closed; however, since 1M-2 was open the brake contactor was not energized. When 2TR is deenergized as just described above, its contacts 2TR-1 will remain closed for approximately six seconds to allow sufiicient time for the collet motor to be stopped. Thereafter it will open and the brake contactor is deenergized to remove the direct current from the motor.

If for some reason it is desired to stop the winder before the normal length of time set for a run, the operator can depress the foot switch 130 to open contact FS1. Since contact 3TR-1 is also open, the coil ICR is deenergized, the winder returns to its innermost position and starter 1M is deenergized. The winder may be restarted as described by release of the foot switch if the foot switch is held depressed until the winder returns to its home position and starter 1M is deenergized.

The winder is automatically stopped it the strand breaks. When the strand 30 is passing over the spring loaded guide 32, the tension of the strand moves the guide against a normally open limit switch LS-1 to close a circuit containing the limit switch LS-l and the secondary winding S of the transformer. When limit switch LS-l is closed thereby short circuiting the secondary winding S of the transformer a small impedance is reflected to the primary winding P of the transformer. In this situation, there is only a small voltage drop, i.e., 20 volts, across the primary winding and there is suflicient voltage left in the circuit in which the primary winding P is located to maintain coil ICR energized. When the strand breaks, the pressure on the guide 32 is released and limit switch LS-l is opened. The secondary winding of the transformer is opened and this reflects a very high impedance to the primary winding P of the transformer. This produces a high voltage drop across the primary winding P and there is insuflicient voltage left in the circuit in which the primary winding P is located to maintain the coil 1CR energized. The coil lCR becomes deenergized because of this and because contact 2M-1 is open while the cam motor 86 is running. The normally closed contact 2M-1 permits bypassing of the transformer circuit during the start-up of the winder. The transformer is used with limit switch LS-l so that switch LS-l is in a low voltage circuit and the operator will not be subjected to a high voltage line in case he touches the circuit in which the limit switch is located.

The pneumatic system is shown schematically in FIG.

11. Air valve 68 as previously mentioned controls the air supplied to each side of the piston 61 mounted in air cylinder 64. The air valve 68 is of the balanced type, for example, as shown in US. Patent No. 2,607,197. The air valve 68 is composed of a casing 146 providing a chamber 142 to which air under high pressure is constantly supplied through an inlet port 143 connected by pipe 144 to an air pressure source. A spool or plunger 145 is mounted within the chamber 142 for movement lengthwise of the chamber. The spool 145 is provided with pistons 147 and 148 at each end which in combination with the walls of the chamber 142 act to separate the chamber into three sections, a central section 149 into which the air under pressure is continuously provided, and sections 150 and 151 at the ends of the chamber. The central section of the chamber is connected to the end sections 150 and 151 by small ports 152 and 153 in the pistons 147 and 148 to provide for eventual equalization of the pressure in the three sections of the chamber. This permits the spool 145 to be in a balanced position within the chamber 142. The spool is moved lengthwise in the chamber by exhausting the air from either end sections 150 or 151 to temporarily unbalance the air pressure within the sections of the chamber and cause the spool to move toward the end of the valve from which the air has been exhausted.

One wall of the central portion of the chamber 142 provides a seat 154 for a slide valve 155 connected with the spool and normally urged by spring 156 against the seat. The inlet port 143 is located beyond the range of movement of the slide valve 155 so that air under pressure is constantly supplied to the chamber 142. The casing 140 has three passages opening into it through the wall forming the valve seat 154. Two of the passages 157 and 158 are connected respectively by lines 65 and 66 to opposite ends of the air cylinder 64. The third passage 160 is connected by a suitable line 161 to the atmosphere through muffier 162 and serves as an exhaust. In one position of the slide valve 155, the passage 157 communicates with the central section 149 of the chamber and it causes air under pressure to be directed toward one side of the piston 61 in air cylinder 64. In this position the passage 158 is connected through valve 155 and passge 160 to the atmosphere and thus serves as an exhaust for the air from the other side of the piston 61 in air cylinder 64. In the other position of the slide valve 155, the passage 158 communicates with the central section 149 of the chamber 142 and the passage 157 communicates with the atmosphere through valve 155 and passage 160.

The sliding of valve 155 is accomplished by alternately bleeding air from the end sections 150 and 151. This is accomplished by means of poppet valves 163 and 164 which are connected to end sections 150 and 151 respectively through air lines 165 and 166 connected to passages in the end walls of the casing 140.

The poppet valves 163 and 164 are mounted on the base 47 of the winder 45 in a line parallel to the travel of the carriage 50 and the collet 29. An automatically adjustable poppet valve engaging means 170 is rigidly attached to the side of the carriage 50 and as the carriage moves back and forth, the engaging means 170 alternately contacts the poppet valves to open them and cause the end sections 150 and 151 of the chamber 142 of valve 68 to be exhausted alternately to the atmosphere. The oil cylinder 63 connected to the air cylinder 64 causes the movement of the carriage to be smooth rather than abrupt. The cylinder 63 contains oil and this oil bleeds through an opening 171 in the piston 60 mounted on the piston rod 57 which extends through the oil cylinder to the air cylinder, and on which piston 61 is also mounted.

The extent of movement of carriage 50 is determined by the engagement of the means 170 alternately with the poppet valves 163 and 164. The engaging means 170 shown in greater detail in FIGS. 12, 13 and 14, is

composed of racks 173 and 174 which engage poppet valves 163 and 164 respectively. The elfective lengths of the racks 173 and 174 are determined by' pinion 177. When the pinion rotates counter-clockwise as viewed in FIG. 12, the rack 174 is caused to move to the left and thereby increase its eifective length as a cam for engaging poppet valve 163 and rack 174 is caused to move to the right and thereby increase its effective length as a cam for engaging poppet valve 164. The racks 173 and 174 move respectively in channels 180 and 181 in support 183 which is rigidly attached to the side of the carriage 50.

The pinion 177 is mounted on an axle 185 which is mounted for rotation in hearings in the support 183. The pinion 177 is driven by means of a ratchet 190 which is also mounted on axle 185 and the ratchet 190 is in turn given rotational movement by means of pawl 192. The pawl 192 is caused to move by movement of the carriage 50. As the carriage moves to the left as shown in FIG. 12, roller 195 comes into contact with stationary cam 200 mounted on the base 47. The roller 195 is mounted for free rotation on the end of link 202 which is pivotally mounted at 203 on support 183. The link 202 is normally held in an upright position by means of spring 205 attached at one end to fixed pin 206 extending from support 183 and at the other end to the end of the link 202 opposite from the roller.

Engagement of the roller 195 with the cam 200 causes the link 202 to rotate. This in turn causes link 210 to move. Link 210 is connected at one end to a pin 212 mounted on link 202 between the pivotal mounting of the link and the end of the link containing the roller 195 and mounted at the other end to the central portion of a link 213. Link 213 is mounted for free rotation at one end on a bearing integral with the axle 185 and carrying on its other end pawl 192 which is spring biased thereon to hold the pawl in engagement with the teeth of the ratchet 190. Another pawl 215 is pivotally mounted on pin 216 extending from support 183 and is spring loaded so that the engaging end of the pawl is held in position against the teeth of the ratchet 190. The pawl 215 serves to hold the ratchet in its new position each time the pawl 192 returns to its original position when the carriage moves to the right and the roller 195 becomes disengaged with the cam 200. Thus, for each movement of the carriage to the left and return the ratchet is moved one notch and the racks 173 and 174 are moved outwardly a short distance, for example, ,4 to /4 inch.

The operation of the winder with respect to the oscillation of the carriage 50 and collet 29 is now described. The solenoid valve 135 controls the operation of air valve 68 to control whether or not the carriage 50 returns to and remains in its innermost starting position or whether it oscillates between positions spaced outwardly from the innermost starting position. When the solenoid valve 135 is closed, the line 166 connecting passage 168 to poppet valve 164 is closed and no air can escape from end section 151 whether the poppet valve 164 is open or not. If the carriage 50 is in its innermost position and the solenoid valve 135 is closed, the carriage will stay in that position. When the carriage is in the innermost position, the rack 174 holds the poppet valve 164 open; however, the carriage 50 cannot move forward until the solenoid valve 135 is open so as to connect the end section 151 with the poppet valve 164 through line 166. The various valves and pistons in the pneumatic system are shown in FIG. 6 in their position at start-up with the piston 61 in the cylinder 64 being in the first or innermost position indicated adjacent the cylinder 64.

As established in the above description of the electrical diagram in FIG. 10, the collet starts to rotate and the stand initially formed is wound at the end of the collet for a time interval until the collet gets up to the desired winding speed. After this interval, the normally open contact 1TR-1 closes to energize solenoid SV-l of the solenoid valve 135. The solenoid valve opens and exhaust line 166 is now open to poppet valve 164. The balanced condition of air valve 68 is upset and the spool and slide valve 155 move to reverse the flow of air through lines 65 and 66 to the cylinder 64 and cause the piston 61 and carriage 50 to move forward.

As the carriage 50 approaches its outermost position, the rack 173 engages poppet valve 163 to exhaust air through line 165 from end section of chamber 142 and unbalance the valve 68. The spool 145 and slide valve are moved to their alternate positions and the flow of air in lines 65 and 66 to the cylinder 64 is again reversed to stop the carriage at the outermost position and reverse its movement. A similar procedure is followed when the rack 174 engages poppet valve 164 on the return motion of the carriage and the carriage is stopped and reversed at a third position intermediate the first (innermost) and second (outermost) positions.

The balancing and unbalancing of the air valve 68 causes the carriage 50 and collet 29 to move automatically slowly back and forth through distances as determined by the engagement of the racks 173 and 174 with the poppet valves 163 and 164 respectively. Since the racks are extended with each movement of the carriage back and forth on the base, they strike the poppet valves 163 and 164 sooner with each pass than in the preceding pass. This results in each succeeding layer of strand wound on the forming package terminating slightly inwardly in an axial direction from the end of the preceding layer. The buildup of the layers 220 of strand is shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 15 is an elevation partly in section showing diagrammatically how a strand, such as a 400 filament, 150 strand, is built up in superposed layers 220 on the forming tube 28. Each layer 220 is deposited in the form of a filling wind with the strand being laid down with a very slight traverse from cam 35 and with the layer being first formed at one end of the tube and progressing slowly to the other end by virtue of the relatively slow axial movement, i.e., about 50 to 150 inches per minute, of the collet with respect to the cam 35. The strand is wound around the forming tube in small helixes so that generally each turn of the strand is parallel to the preceding turn with the exception that the strand describes a very flat sine wave, i.e., I to 10 degrees at the point of crossover, as imposed by the low amplitude, high frequency action of cam 35. The axial movement of the collet is slow enough with respect to the rotation of the collet that the strand is deposited upon itself in each layer to a thickness of about 4 to 8 strand diameters.

The movement of the collet causes the leading edge of the layer A to be built up at an angle a to the surface of the forming tube, i.e., about 10 to 20 degrees as measured in a plane parallel to and containing the axis of the collet. At the end of a layer this angle a is steeper as the collet pauses prior to starting on the return trip. As the strand transfers from one layer (A) to the next (B), it passes several times around the tube in first the end of layer A and then in the beginning of the next layer B. As the collet starts back in the opposite direction, the leading edge of the next layer (B) is sloped in the opposite direction at the same angle 5 to the surface of the forming tube as the preceding layer. Each layer at the end where the last strand is laid down as contrasted to the end where the new layer begins terminates short of the end of the preceding layer.

It is desired that the diameter of the fibers in the strand formed in each of the succeeding layers 220 in the forming package be the same. It can be seen that in forming package 222 each succeeding layer increases the diameter of the package and thus increases the attenuating speed'of the fibers if the rpm. of the collet is maintained constant. This increase in diameter in the forming package can 13 be compensated for by increasing the temperature of the bushing during the fiber forming run and/or reducing the rpm. of the collet. Both of these methods will be discussed.

In FIGS. 16 and 17 a means for increasing the bushing temperature stepwise with the formation of each layer is shown. This means is described in conjunction with FIG. 12. Mounted on the base 47 are two limit switches 233 and 234. These limit switches are mounted in line with the poppet valves 163 and 164 with limit switch 233 being mounted on the base just inboard of poppet valve 163 so that rack 173 strikes the limit switch 233 shortly before it strikes the poppet valve 163 and with limit switch 234 being mounted on the base just inboard of poppet valve 164 so that rack 174 strikes the limit switch 234 just before it strikes the poppet valve 164. The limit switches 233 and 234 are located in suitable circuits for either changing the bushing temperature or the rpm. of the collet motor.

FIGS. 16 and 17 show circuits for increasing the bushing temperature with the completion of each longitudinal movement of the carriage so that each succeeding layer on the forming package will be wound at the same effective attenuating speed so as to produce the same diameter fiber. An electrical power circuit containing suitable controls for supplying energy to the bushing 18 is shown in FIG. 16. The power circuit includes a saturable core reactor 236 in series with a power transformer 238 for the bushing 18. The bushing terminals 24 connect the bushing 18 in series with the secondary winding 240 of the transformer 238. The primary winding 242 of the transformer 238 is connected in series with the saturable core reactor 236 and the series circuit is connected through contacts 243 of a line circuit breaker to a suitable power line source, L L such for example as a 440 volt, 60 cycle line.

The current regulating controls for the power circuit may be provided by a conventional temperature measuring and regulating unit 245 which is arranged to operate in conjunction with a thermocouple 246 which is in thermal contact with the bushing 18. The unit 245 measures the temperature of the bushing 18 by means of the thermocouple 246 and indicates the temperature signal at a meter 247 provided with means for presetting the temperature desired. As the temperature signal fed to the unit 245 varies from a preset value, the unit functions to supply a corrected signal to the power circuit by way of the saturable reactor to establish the heating current How to the bushing for the temperature desired.

The unit 245 receives in addition to the signal from the thermocouple 246 an auxiliary signal from a variable resistance unit 248 which in effect causes a false signal to be supplied to the temperature regulating unit 245. The increase in temperature of the bushing is accomplished by supplying a false temperature signal to the temperature regulating unit 245 from the variable resistance unit 248 along with the actual temperature signal supplied by the thermocouple 246. The variable resistance unit 248 is connected to the regulating unit 245 in series with the thermocouple 246 and is so arranged that an increase in the signal from the unit 248 causes a decrease in the total signal so as to indicate falsely to the temperature regulating unit 245 that the temperature of the bushing 18 is falling. The temperature regulator unit 245 then sends an increased current signal to the saturable core reactor which reduces the inductive reactance of the reactor and permits more current to be supplied to the transformer 238 and consequently more current to the bushing 18.

The variable resistance unit 248 is shown in FIG. 17 in more detail in combination with the temperature regulating unit 245, thermocouple 246 and bushing 18. Electrical energy for the false signal generated by the resistance unit 248 is supplied over suitable power lines of an alternating current source L L This energy is supplied to a rectifier 250 which provides a constant direct current reference voltage for the false signal circuit. The direct current portion of the variable resistance unit circuit contains rheostats 252, 254 and 256 from the positive side of the rectifier. Rheostat 252 is used to control the current supplied to potentiometer connected rheostat 254 and rheostat 256 is used to control the rate of temperature change. The rheostat 254 is mechanically changed by a spring biased ratchet 260 which is driven by pawl 262 in stepwise fashion so as to derive a variable voltage which can be used to pass current through a resistance 263 which is in series with the thermocouple 246 and temperature regulating unit 245.

The pawl 262 is spring loaded so as to be normally out of contact with ratchet 260. The pawl 262 is actuated by coil 264 to move against the teeth of ratchet 260 to rotate it. The coil 264 is in series with limit switches 233 and 234 (which are in parallel with each other) and with normally open contact 2M-2. Contact 2M-2 is closed as solenoid valve is opened and the collet begins to move out from the home position. Thereafter, each time either of the limit switches is closed by racks 173 and 174, the pawl 262 steps up ratchet 260 and the rheostat 254 is changed stepwise for each axial movement of the collet. A spring biased pawl 266 is normally ongaged with ratchet 260 to keep the ratchet from returning to its original position as pawl 262 retracts each time. The pawl 266 is disengaged fro-m the ratchet by coil 270 which is in series with normally open contact BC-2. Contact BC-2 is normally open but is closed when brake contactor BC is energized to stop the collet motor 70. When contact BC-2 is closed, coil 270 is energized, pawl 266 is retracted and ratchet 260 returns to its original position. Ratchet 260 is ready for another fiber-forming run when coil 270 is deenergized and pawl 266 again engages the ratchet.

The circuit just described produces a stepwise varied current through a low value resistance 263 connected in series with the bushing thermocouple. The current flow ing through the resistance 263 produces the false temperature supplied to the temperature regulating unit. It can be readily understood that a conventional stepping switch and a series of fixed resistors can be employed in place of the ratchet 260, pawls 264 and 266 and potentiometer connected rheostat 254.

In FIG. 18 there is shown a diagrammatic view of an electrical control means for varying the speed of the collet motor while maintaining the bushing temperature constant in order to compensate for the increase in diameter of the forming package. This is an alternative to the control means shown in FIGS. 16 and 17. In the control means shown in FIG. 18 there is a reference signal generating unit which supplies a speed command signal to a conventional adjustable speed drive power and control unit which in turn controls the speed of the collet motor. The speed of the motor is modified by the power and control unit to be directly proportional to the reference signal. The reference signal generating unit is adjusted to produce a signal and determines the speed of the collet motor at the beginning of the fiber forming run. This signal is decreased stepwise during the run in response to the limit switches 233 and 234.

A direct current reference source 280 produces a constant voltage from power lines L L The reference voltage causes a current to flow through a voltage divider network composed of rheostats 282 and 284 and pawl driven potentiometer rheostat 286 in series with each other. A rheostat 288 is in parallel with rheostat 286 and in series with rheostats 282 and 284. Rheostats 282 and 284 are positioned in tandem with a common adjustment shaft so that as the resistance of one is increased, the resistance of the other is decreased, and vice versa, so that their total resistance remains constant. These rheostats fix the speed of the motor at the beginning of the run. Rheostat 288 controls the extent to which the speed of the collet can be reduced during the run. Rheostat 286 controls the actual speed of the motor and is driven by a ratchet and pawl arrangement (not shown) in combination with limit switches 233 and 234 in the same manner as described above with respect to ratchet 260 and pawls 262 and 270 in FIG. 17.

The speed reference signal between the brush contact of the rheostat 286 and the negative reference source line is compared to the speed feed-back signal from a tachometer generator 290 that is driven from the collet motor 70 and the difference or error signal is fed to a conventional adjustable speed drive power unit 292 to control the speed of the motor.

The winder as above described automatically produces longer and larger forming packages for a given size winder than heretofore possible. These packages can be formed with a maximum degree of fiber forming efficiency, i.e., a minimum number of break-outs or discontinuances during a plurality of fiber forming runs. The larger forming packages permit more economic fiber forming operations since the winders run for longer periods of time, thereby reducing the total amount of down time between fiber formnig runs during a given period of time, such as an eight-hour shift period. The forming packages are composed of continuous strand made up of fibers of substantially uniform diameter throughout the package. The end of the strand can be easily found at that point in the outermost layer of strand where the fiber forming operation ended. The strand can be unwound over end from the longer forming pack age without undue creation of fuzz or strand breakage. A plurality of splice-free twisted yarn packages can be produced from the larger forming packages. For example, two 4% pound packages of twisted yarn can be produced from a 9 pound forming package.

Various additions or modifications to the winder as described in FIGS. 1 to 18 above can be made. For example, when the winder is employed in a single-level process, it is desirable as described above that the angle which the strand describes in its passage from the guide 32 to the cam be kept as small as possible. The reasons for this is that as the angle increases, the tension and friction on the strand 30 increases as it passes through the guide 32. This is illustrated in FIG. 19. The greater the tension and friction on the strand 30, the greater the tendency for an individual fiber 26 in the strand to break and thereby break out the whole strand and discontinue the fiber drawing operation. In order to keep the angle p at a minimum therefore, the guide 32 (and the coating applicator 33 when employed) can be mounted on a support 300 which is rigidly attached to the reciprocating plate 87 which supports the cam 35. This causes the guide 32 and the applicator 33 to reciprocate in a line parallel to the axis of cam 35 and in unison with the cam 35. If no size is applied to the individual fibers 26, or if the size is applied by means of a saturated felt pad which is mounted in the guide 32, it is necessary only to reciprocate the guide 32 in conjunction with the cam 35. The reciprocation of the guide 32 (and applicator 33 when employed) is desirable in a one-level process but may be omitted in a two-level process where the angle #5 is usually much smaller due to the greater distance between the guide 32 and cam 35 than in the onelevel process.

The winder as described may also be modified by omitting the rack and pinion arrangement shown in FIGS. 12 to 14 for progressively shortening the length of travel of the carriage and forming-tube 28. In such case the rack and pinion elements are replaced by a single bar of fixed length so that the ends of the bar strike the poppet valves 163 and 164 at the same point for each reciprocation of the carriage 50 and thereby cause the carriage to move the same distance on each reciprocation. In such case the cam 35 can be modified so that the groove 38 covers a longer distance along the surface of the cam in an axial direction, thereby increasing the throw of the traverse to say, for example, 3 inches. In such case the package formed on the forming tube resembles the outline of a barrel with the package gradually tapering from a minimum thickness at the ends to a maximum thickness toward the center. The forming package produced by this modification of the winder differs from that shown in FIG. 15 in that it has a much shorter flat outer surface in its central portion, said surface being parallel to the surface of the forming tube, and the taper at the ends of the package is more gradual.

In FIG. 20 there is shown another embodiment of the invention wherein the forming package such as shown in FIG. 13 can be produced. In this embodiment of the invention, the rack and pinion device shown in FIGS. 10, 11 and 12 for progressively shortening the reciprocating distance of the carriage 50 is omitted so that the carriage travels through the same distance with each reciprocation. Instead, the inclined plane cam is adapted with a similar rack and pinion device so that its angle with the horizontal is gradually decreased with each succeeding reciprocation of the carriage until the inclined plane is horizontal. As the inclined plane decreases in its angle to the horizontal, it can be seen that the axial distance through which the cam 35 reciprocates is progressively lessened. This achieves the same effect as shortening the distance of reciprocation of the carriage 50 while maintaining the angle of the inclined plane cam 100 constant as shown in FIGS. 1 to 12.

As shown in FIG. 20 the inclined plane is pivotally mounted to the upright portion 75 of the carriage 50 at point 310. The inclined plane is urged upwardly to its maximum angle as permitted by the rack 312 by means of rack spring 315. With each forward travel of the carriage 50, a cam follower 316 on the lower end of a lever 317 is contacted by a ratchet cam 318 mounted rigidly on the upright support 85. The lever 317 is pivotally mounted near its center on a rotatable, horizontal shaft 319 which is mounted for rotation in a block 320 mounted on the upright support 75. The lever 317 is held in a generally vertical position by spring 322 which is fastened at one end to the upper end of the lever 316 and at its other end to a pin 324 rigidly attached to the block 320. As the lower end of the lever 316 hits the ratchet earn 318, a rod 326 is moved by the rearward movement of the lower end of the lever 316 so as to move the ratchet 328 in a counter-clockwise manner by means of pawl 330. As the carriage 50 starts its rearward movement and the lower end of lever 317 disengages the ratchet cam 318 and returns to a normally vertical position, the pawl 334 holds the ratchet in the new position while the pawl 330 slides back to the next indentation in the ratchet.

The ratchet 328 is mounted on a shaft 336 which also has a pinion 337 mounted on it. The pinion 337 engages rack 312 to move the rack horizontally in the direction of its length. A roller 338 is mounted on the rear end of the rack 312 so that it projects horizontally from the rack through a slot 339 in upright flange 340 of an angle iron 341 into a slot 342 in cam 343. The slot 342 extends along the length of the cam in a direction which is parallel to the guiding surface of the cam 343. The slot 339 guides the roller 338 on the end of the rack 312 through a fixed horizontal path.

As the shaft 336 is rotated by the rotation of the ratchet 328, the pinion 337 rotates thereby moving the rack 312 forward (to the left in the drawing) which in turn pivots the forward end of the inclined plane downwardly to reduce the angle of the inclined plane guiding surface with a horizontal plane. The angle of the inclined plane guiding surface with a horizontal plane can be reduced to zero for the last reciprocating movement of the carriage 50 during the fiber forming run. As the rack 312 moves forward during the run, the rack spring 315 is compressed. At the end of the run when the carriage returns to its innermost, starting position, the pawls 330 and 334 are engaged at their ends away from the projections of the ratchet respectively by means of stops 348 and 349 thereby disengaging the pawls from the ratchet. When the pawls are disengaged from the ratchet, the compressed rack spring 315 expands to move the rack rearwardly. As the rack moves rearwardly, the shaft 336 rotates back to its original position and the inclined plane cam 343 is raised to its original position.

Although the present invention has been described with respect to specific details of certain embodiments thereof, such details are not to be considered as limitations upon the scope of the invention except insofar as set forth in the accompanying claims.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my cpending application Serial No. 35,643 filed June 13, 1960, now abandoned.

I claim:

1. Apparatus for winding a strand which comprises a cylindrical Winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, and means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the direction of movement of the tube during its reciprocation.

2. Apparatus for winding a strand which comprises a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, and means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube in a direction which is opposite to the direction of movement of the tube during its reciprocation, said traverse reciprocating means being responsive to the reciprocating movement of the tube reciprocating means.

3. Apparatus for winding a strand which comprises a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube and means for progressively shortening the distance of the reciprocatory movement of the tube during the winding process.

4. Apparatus for winding a strand which comprises a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube and means for progres sivcly shortening the distance of the reciprocatory movement of the travers during the winding process.

5. Apparatus for winding a strand which comprises a strand guide, a cylindrical Winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube, and means for reciprocating the guide in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube in a direction and through a distance which is similar to the reciprocating movement of the traverse.

6. Apparatus for forming a strand of glass fibers which comprises a container for holding a supply of molten glass and means for drawing a plurality of glass fibers from the container including a guide for grouping the fibers into a strand, a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse mechanism positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, and means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube.

7. Apparatus for forming a strand of glass fibers which comprises a container for holding a supply of molten glass and means for drawing a plurality of glass fibers from the container including a guide for grouping the fibers into a strand, a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse mechanism positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, and means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube, said traverse reciprocating mean being responsive to the tube reciprocating means.

8. Apparatus for forming a strand of glass fibers which comprises a container for holding a supply of molten glass and means for drawing a plurality of glass fibers from the container including the guide for grouping the fibers into a strand, a cylindrical winding tube, means for rotating the tube about its axis, means for reciprocating the tube in an axial direction, a strand traverse positioned adjacent the tube, means for actuating the traverse, means for reciprocating the traverse in a line which is parallel to the axis of the tube and in a direction which is opposite to the reciprocating movement of the rotating tube, and means for progressively shortening the relative reciprocating motion between the tube and the traverse during the winding process.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,927,547 Gordon Sept. 19, 1933 2,234,986 Slayter et a1 Mar. 18, 1941 2,379,813 Loveridge et al. July 3, 1945 2,391,870 Beach Jan. 1, 1946 2,699,415 Nachtman Jan. 11, 1955 3,041,662 Cochran July 3, 1962 3,076,324 Morgan Feb. 5, 1963 FOREIGN PATENTS 819,665 France Oct. 23, 1937 774,339 Great Britain May 8, 1957

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3256079 *Oct 8, 1964Jun 14, 1966Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoMethod and apparatus for forming fibers
US3292871 *Nov 18, 1963Dec 20, 1966Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpApparatus for forming and collecting filaments
US3292872 *Jul 29, 1964Dec 20, 1966Johns ManvilleMethod and apparatus for traversing strand material
US3334980 *Jul 15, 1964Aug 8, 1967Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpApparatus for forming and collecting filaments
US3382123 *Jul 11, 1966May 7, 1968American Air Filter CoMethod and apparatus for making filamentous mats
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Classifications
U.S. Classification65/539, 242/481.8, 242/178, 242/476.8, 242/480.5, 242/920
International ClassificationB65H54/28, D02G3/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65H55/04, B65H2403/47, Y10S242/92, B65H57/28, B65H54/2893, B65H2701/3122, B65H54/2803, B65H54/2842
European ClassificationB65H54/28A, B65H54/28H4, B65H57/28, B65H55/04, B65H54/28S