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Publication numberUS3152623 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1964
Filing dateNov 16, 1961
Priority dateJun 9, 1961
Publication numberUS 3152623 A, US 3152623A, US-A-3152623, US3152623 A, US3152623A
InventorsCarriol Louis Auguste
Original AssigneeSatam Sa Pour Tous App S Mecan
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Liquid flow control apparatus
US 3152623 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 13, 1964 c o 3,152,623

LIQUID FLOW CQNTRQL APPARATUS Filed Nov. 16, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR LOUIS AUGUSTE CARRlOL BY '4 M WWW {1: 6,

ATTORNEYS Oct. 13, 1964 A. CARRIOL LIQUID- FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS Filed Nov. 16.

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fuel 2 INVENTOR LOUIS AUGUSTE CARRIOL.

FIG. 3

ATTORN EYS United States Patent LIQUID FLOW CONTROL APPARATUS Louis Auguste Carriol, Aulnay-sous-Bois, France, asslgnor to Satam-Societe Anonyme pour Tons Appareillages Mecaniques, La Courneuve, France, a French company Filed Nov. 16, 1961, Ser. No. 152,603 Claims priority, application France June 9, 1961 10 Claims. (Cl. 141-209) The present invention relates to apparatus, commonly referred to as a nozzle, for metered delivery of liquids of the type described in my U.S. Patents No. 2,787,294, entitled Combined Valve and Shut-Off Means Therefor, which issued April 2, 1957 and No. 2,802,491, entitled Device for Filling a Receptacle, Comprising Automatic Stopping Means, which issued August 13, 1957, both of which are assigned to the same assignee as the present invention. In apparatus of the type disclosed in the firstmentioned patent the delivery nozzle is held open so long as a stream of liquid emerging in a jet from a jet-forming device or injector maintains under pressure the liquid contained in a Pitot tube having one open end in the normal path of the stream from the injector.

In certain types of apparatus of this kind, one of the faces of a piston associated with the principal valve which controls the flow of liquid through the nozzle is first subjected to the pressure of the liquid upstream of that valve through a channel which is controlled by an auxiliary valve held open by the operator, and is thereafter subjected to the pressure in the Pitot tube.

A shortcoming of nozzles of this kind is the fact that the valve may open again after closing, for example if there occurs a decline in pressure upstream thereof. A further disadvantage lies in the fact that nozzles of this type as heretofore proposed cannot readily be employed in liquid delivery systems wherein the quantity to be delivered is pre-set, as by an operation independent of manipulation of the nozzle. Apparatus for so pre-setting the amount to be delivered will hereinafter be called predetermining apparatus.

The present invention provides liquid delivery apparatus of an improved type substantially free from these shortcomings. In accordance with the present invention the auxiliary valve is not held opened throughout the liquid delivery operation. Rather, it closes automatically during that phase of the delivery operation begun by the formation of the liquid stream emerging from the jet and ending with the opening of the main valve.

Preferably the auxiliary valve is opened by means of a cam controlled by a lever under control of the operator. At a specified moment during the phase of operation just previously described, the auxiliary valve is freed from control by this cam and is thus permitted to close.

The invention will now be further described with reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view through a delivery nozzle according to the invention;

FIG. 2 is a partial sectional view similar to that of FIG. 1 but at a larger scale and showing certain elements of structure in greater detail;

FIG. 3 is a cross sectional view taken along the lines 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to that of FIG. 2 on a still further enlarged scale, showing the main valve of the nozzle and the jet-forming structure; and

FIGS. 5 and 6 are further detail views on the same section as that of FIG. 2, illustrating the relative positions of certain parts of the apparatus during opening and closing of the nozzle respectively.

Referring to FIG. 1, the liquid to be delivered reaches 3,152,623 Patented Get. 13, 1964 the delivery nozzle of FIG. 1 at the point 2, where the nozzle may connect to a flexible tube. The liquid passes thence through a chamber 4 and through a main control valve 6 and emerge via a chamber 8 and nozzle tube 10. A manually operated control lever 14 effects rotation of a lever 16 and of the shaft 18 to which the lever is affixed. Lever 16 is loaded by means of a spring 29 to counterclockwise rotation. The shaft 18 passes into the chamber 4 of the nozzle through a liquid-tight seal 22 (FIG. 3) in a nozzle body 24 and carries an arm 26 at the end of which there is formed a cam surface 28 and a catch 30 (FIG. 2). The arm 26 bears against the valve 6 under stress of the spring 21 tending to close the valve against its seat 32 (FIG. 2). The catch 30, as shown in FIG. 5, is arranged to open an auxiliary valve 34 when lever 26 is rotated clockwise by operation of hand lever 14, notwithstanding the stress of springs 36 which bear against trunnions 38 on the valve 34, tending to hold the latter closed. The angle of operation of the springs 36 is however so chosen as to permit translation of the valve 34 along its seat 40, as shown in FIG. 6, by operation of the cam surface 28, when lever 26, once having rotated clockwise past valve 34, is allowed to return counterclockwise under influence of spring 20. This translational movement is limited by means of a stop not shown in the drawings.

The main valve 6 is carried on and functionally forms part of a movable support generally indicated at 42 which moves within the nozzle body 24. The support is of generally tubular shape, and includes a jet-forming chamber 44, a jet-flight chamber 46, and an interruption-flow aperture 48. A connecting tube 51! of flexible material extends from a nipple 52 communicating with aperture 48 down the nozzle tube 10 to a fixed termination at 54 on the side of the discharge end 12 of the nozzle. Coaxially disposed with the jet-forming chamber 44 in support 42 is provided a Pitot tube 56 supported on or formed in a piston 58 which is movable within a cylindrical surface 60 formed in the nozzle body 24.

The auxiliary valve 34 controls the admission of liquid from chamber 4 into a channel 62 which extends to an orifice 64 arranged in the end wall 66 which closes the space within cylinder 60 at the end thereof opposite valve 6. A further valve 68 is provided to close the orifice 64, valve 68 being stressed against orifice 64 by means of a spring 70 bearing against the piston 58. The other face of the valve 68 may bear against the rear face 59 of the piston 58 at the outlet end of the Pitot tube 56. A small amount of play is provided between the periphery of the valve 68 and the cylinder 60.

The liquid arriving in the chamber 46 through valve 6 and jet passage 44 which does not enter tube 56 is free to pass out through the annular opening at 72 between nozzle body 24 and piston 58. The valve 6, formed as part of or fastened to movable support 42, includes a cylindrical portion 7 which moves with a liquid-tight fit in a cylindrical seat 25 in the nozzle body 24. The seat 25 thus serves as a guide to the valve 6. When the portion 7 becomes disengaged from its seat 25, the valve 34 becomes disengaged from the catch 30 on the cam 28.

In the central zone of the cylindrical part 7 of the valve 6 there is provided an annular passage 9 which communicates through radial holes 11 (FIG. 4) with the chamber 44 for formation of a jet at throat 45.

The operation of the nozzle illustrated is as follows:

When the operator rotates the lever 14 counterclockwise as seen in FIG. 1, the catch 30 on the lever arm 26 unseats the auxiliary valve 34. See FIG. 5. The liquid arriving under pressure from the inlet at 2 through chamber 4 thus passes into the channel 62. This fluid unseats the valve 68 notwithstanding the pressure of the spring 70, which is weak, and stresses the valve 68 against the rear face 59 of the piston 58, thus closing the Pitot tube 55. Thus, the liquid pushes the piston 58 towards the right as seen in FIG. 2. Via the piston 58 the liquid shifts support 42 and with it the valve 6 to the right.

At the end of a short travel, the annular channel 9 of the valve 6 becomes unseated from its cylindrical seat 25, opening the radial passages 11 to the inlet chamber 4. The liquid arriving under pressure via the opening 2 floods the channel h and passes through the radial holes 11 into the chamber 44 and thence through the throat 4-5 to form a jet in the chamber 46. The stream of liquid formed at the outlet 45 of the injector strikes the end 57 of the Pitot tube. The pressure existing within the latter increases and together with the stress exerted by the spring 70 pushes away the valve 68. The pressure within Pitot tube 55 is now accordingly exerted over the whole surface of the valve 68, which thereupon closes the opening 64. The excess liquid on the left side of the valve 68 now passes to the other face of the valve through the clearance between the valve 68 and the cylinder 60. This pressure existing within Pitot tube 56 likewise exists over the rear face 59 of the piston 58, which is thus shifted to the right, carrying with it the valve 6 against the stress of the compression spring 74-, which is engaged between shoulders on the support 42 and nozzle body 24.

At the moment when the cylindrical part 7 of valve 6 becomes completely unseated at 25, that is when the valve 6 opens to provide direct communication between chamber 4 and the space 8 exterior of support 42 but within nozzle body 24, valve 34 becomes disengaged from the catch 30. The valve 34 then closes the channel 62 under action of the spring 36. The channel 62 is accordingly closed off from the portion of the nozzle upstream of the valve 6.

The face 59 of the piston 58 is then subjected only to the pressure of the liquid existing within the Pitot tube 56. The piston 58, support 42 and consequently the valve 6 are shifted still further to the right, to the extent permitted by the lever 26 whose position is determined by the operator at the lever 14.

Delivery through tube It) continues until the moment when the liquid level in the tank or reservoir being filled reaches the opening 54. At this instant, air in the tank to be filled which previously passed into the chamber 46 via the tube 50 is replaced by the liquid. The chamber 46 is then flooded with liquid so that the jet emerging from the injector chamber 44 no longer strikes against the Pitot tube 56. Pressure within tube 56 accordingly falls. Under these conditions the valve 6 is closed by the action of the moving liquid and the stress of spring 74, and delivery is terminated.

To reinitiate delivery it is necessary first to allow the lever 14 to rotate full clockwise, in which position cam 28 is brought back counterclockwise to the position illustrated in FIG. 2. During this movement the valve 34 is displaced along its seat by cam action between the surfaces 2S and 35 without opening the channel 62, as illustrated in FIG. 6. Thereafter the valve 34 is immediately restored by action of the spring 36. The nozzle then occupies the position shown in FIG. 2. For a new delivery the operator must once again actuate lever 14.

The operation of the valves 6 and 34 and of the arm is further illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 6 which respectively represent the nozzle in the process of opening at the beginning of a delivery and of closing at the end of a delivery. In FIG. 5, arm 26 is rotating clockwise as the operator rotates lever 14 counterclockwise. Arm 26 has opened valve 34 at the catch 30 formed by the end of the arm, and valve 34 is about to slip off of the catch and close again. Some fluid has passed down channel 62 and valve 6 is about to open under influence of the pressure exerted by the fluid through orifice 64 and valve 68 on the rear face 59 of piston 58.

In FIG. 6 the valve 6 is in process of closing as the result of flooding of chamber 46 from the tube 50. Valve 34 is closed and lever 26 is shown, in full lines, in full clockwise position where it is being held by the operator (or by a detent or equivalent not shown). Chamber 46, within support 42, has been partly or wholly flooded by liquid passing up the tube 50. In consequence the jet from chamber 44 impinging on the end 57 of tube 56 has been disrupted, and the pressure in tube 56 and on the back face 59 of piston 58 has declined. Hence valve 6 is moving to the left toward closed position under influence of spring 74.

FIG. 6 further illustrates, by means of dotted line showings of arm 26 and valve 34, how when hand lever 14 is released the lever 25 rotates counterclockwise and lifts valve 34 by means of the cam surface 28, without opening valve 34. This motion of valve 34, without opening thereof, permits restoration of the apparatus to the closed condition shown in FIG. 2, without re-initiating the process by which the valve 6 is opened.

It is to be observed that:

(a) Since the valve 34 closes the channel 62 before full opening of the valve 6, the latter cannot open again without execution of the two operations described in the fourth preceding paragraph.

(b) The rate at which the liquid is delivered can be adjusted by means of the lever 14, since the opening of the valve 6 is a function of the position of the arm 26.

(c) The valve 68 lies outside the normal path of the liquid flow and consequently has no effect on the normal operation of the nozzle. In view of the action of the spring 7%, which is weak, the valve es prevents opening of the nozzle if the pressure of liquid upstream of the principal valve 6 is below a specified value, normally fixed by the public authorities charged with weights and measures.

(d) In case the pressure of the liquid entering the nozzle at 2 declines sufficiently so that the jet formed in chamber 44 is no longer able to perform its function, the valve 6 will close automatically under influence of the spring '74. Reopening of the valve 6 can then occur only as indicated in (a) above.

(2) If for any reason the rate of flow of liquid through the nozzle falls below a s ecified level, for example one gallon per minute, the valve 6 will close since the pressure produced by the jet on the face 59 of the piston 58 will decline below the value of the forces tending to close valve 6, in particular the force of the spring '74.

(f) The nozzle of the present invention can be used without difliculty with a predetermining apparatus. In general, the pressure prevailing in the flexible hose at the end of which a nozzle is fixed will vary at the end of a delivery operation according as the delivery is interrupted by closure of the nozzle on the one hand or by emptying of a measuring vessel or otherwise completing delivery of a predetermined amount on the other hand. When the nozzle is. closed the pressure which prevails in the hose is the maximum which the pump is capable of supplying. This may be of the order of twenty-one pounds per square inch and the flexible hose is accordingly stretched thereby. When instead a predetermining apparatus is employed the flow into the fiexible hose is interrupted by the valve of that apparatus, disposed upstream of the flexible hose. The pressure existing in the latter when actual delivery stops will then correspond to that due to the threshhold level of the valve 6 in the nozzle. This closing pressure may be of the order of four pounds per square inch. The flexible hose is accordingly much less stressed.

By means of the nozzle of the present invention this disadvantage may be avoided, the maximum pressure being maintained in the flexible hose. Consequently no inaccuracies are introduced into the successive deliveries. This result may be obtained by providing a small hole through the valve of the predetermining apparatus, this hole being dimensioned so that the flow therethrough is below that which will maintain the nozzle open. Under these conditions and in spite of the presence of the maximum pressure in the flexible hose,.the valve 6 will close when the jet from the injector chamber 44 becomes inadequate to hold the valve 6 open as indicated in paragraph (d) above.

Naturally the present invention is not limited to the details of the example which has been described. Thus, for example the piston 58 and of the valve 6 may form a single element instead of two separate parts as shown, for purposes of simplicity of construction. Whereas the injector 44 is controlled by the principal valve 6 in the example described, this injector may consistently with the invention be supplied from a separate channel having therein a second auxiliary valve separate from the valve 6. The hole through the valve of the predetermining apparatus may be replaced by a by-pass line around that valve.

It will be observed that in FIG. 2 the cross sectional area of piston 58 is greater than that of the valve 6 at its seat 25. In consequence of this fact the pressure of the liquid, while valve 34 is open, exerts a stress on piston 58 towards the right, in FIG. 2, greater than the stress exerted on valve 6 toward the left.

It will be seen from the foregoing that the invention provides liquid flow control apparatus including a main channel extending from an inlet at 2 through the passage 4, the valve 6, the chamber 8 and the nozzle tube 10 to an outlet at 12. A main valve 6 is disposed in this main flow channel, coupled to a piston 53. An auxiliary channel 62 connects the side of piston 58 (at its face 59) on which pressure tends to open the valve 6 with the main channel at 4 through an auxiliary valve 34. This liquid flow control apparatus also includes at 44 a jet-forming chamber and at 46 a jet flight chamber into which successively liquid may flow, when valve 6 is opened, from the inlet side of the main channel. In addition, the apparatus includes in the tube 56 a receiving tube disposed in the path of the jet passing down the chamber 46 and this receiving tube communicates with the side of piston 58 open to channel 62. The flexible tube 50 extending from the outlet of the main channel at 12 up to the jet flight chamber 46, which in the embodiment shown is movable with the valve 6,, constitutes means by which the jet in chamber 46 may be disrupted when the liquid level in the reservoir being lled reaches the outlet 12.

I claim:

1. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve in said auxiliary channel, whereby upon opening of said auxiliary valve said main valve is opened by pressure exerted on said piston by liquid in said auxiliary channel, means responsive to the opening of said main valve for causing said auxiliary valve to return to a closed position, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, and means to supply liquid to said jet flight chamber to disrupt said jet.

2. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve in said auxiliary channel, a check valve in said auxiliary channel downstream of said auxiliary valve and upstream of said side of said piston, means responsive to the opening of said main valve for causing said auxiliary valve to move from an open to a closed position, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, and means to supply liquid to said jet flight chamber to disrupt said jet.

3. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve in said auxiliary channel, said piston having a greater cross sectional area than said main valve, whereby upon opening of said auxiliary valve said main valve is opened by pressure exerted on said piston by liquid in said auxiliary channel, means responsive to the opening of said main valve for causing said auxiliary valve to return to a closed position, said main valve having therewithin a jet-forming chamber communicating when said main valve is open with said main channel upstream of said main valve, said piston having an aperture therethrough extending from said side of said piston to a position in the path of the jet emerging from said jet-forming chamber, and means to disrupt impingement of said jet on said orifice.

4. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve adapted to close said auxiliary channel, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, means to supply liquid to said jet flight chamber to disrupt said jet, resilient means biasing said main valve to closed position, means to retract said resilient means, and means for temporarily opening said auxiliary valve during retraction of said resilient means.

5. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve adapted to close said auxiliary channel, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, means to supply liquid to said jet flight chamber to disrupt said jet, a lever engageable with said main valve throughout a range of travel of said main valve, resilient means biasing said lever into rotation toward the closed position of said main valve, and means coupled to said lever for temporarily opening said auxiliary valve during rotation of said lever in the opposite direction.

6. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve adapted to close said auxiliary channel, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, means to supply liquid to said jet flight chamber to disrupt said jet, a lever engageable with said main valve, resilient means biasing said lever into rotation in a first direction which closes said main valve, said lever including a catch portion opening said auxiliary valve upon rotation of said lever in the direction opposite said first direction and a cam portion permitting displacement of said auxiliary valve without opening thereof upon rotation of said lever in said first direction.

7. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel extending from an inlet to an outlet, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve in said auxiliary channel, means responsive to the opening of said main valve for causing said auxiliary valve to move from an open to a closed position, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, and means defining a channel extending from said outlet to said jet flight chamber.

8. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel extending from an inlet to an outlet, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve in said auxiliary channel, said main valve having therewithin a jet-forming chamber communicating when said main valve is open with said main channel upstream of said main valve, said main valve further having therewithin a jet flight chamber accommodating a jet of liquid emerging from said jetforming chamber, said piston having an aperture therethrough extending from said side of said piston to a position in the path of the jet emerging from said jetforming chamber, and means defining a channel extending from said outlet to said jet flight chamber, said last-named channel including a flexible portion.

9. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupied to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve adapted to close said auxiliary channel, means to define a fluid jet communicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, an aspirating tube opening into said jet flight chamber, resilient means biasing said main valve to closed position, means to retract said resilient means, and means for temporarily opening said auxiliary valve during retraction of said resilient means.

10. Liquid flow control apparatus comprising means defining a main flow channel extending from an inlet to an outlet, a main valve disposed in said channel, a piston coupled to said valve, an auxiliary channel connecting the side of said piston on which pressure tends to open said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, an auxiliary valve adapted to close said auxiliary channel, means to define a fluid jet cornmunicating via said main valve with said main channel upstream of said main valve, means defining a jet flight chamber, a receiving tube disposed in the path of said jet and communicating with said side of said piston, an aspirating tube connected between said outlet and said jet flight chamber, a lever engageable with said main valve, resilient means biasing said lever into rotation in a first direction which closes said main valve, said lever including a catch portion opening said auxiliary valve upon rotation of said lever in the direction opposite said first direction and a cam portion permitting displacement of said auxiliary valve without opening thereof upon rotation of said lever in said first direction.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,681,073 Fraser June 15, 1954 2,787,294 Carriol Apr. 2, 1957 2,841,191 Fraser July 1, 1958 2,871,894 Carriol Feb. 3, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2681073 *Jul 31, 1952Jun 15, 1954Avery Hardoll LtdValve for controlling the flow of liquids
US2787294 *Nov 12, 1952Apr 2, 1957S A T A M Sa Appareillages MecCombined valve and shut-off means therefor
US2841191 *May 21, 1957Jul 1, 1958Avery Hardoll LtdLiquid dispensing apparatus
US2871894 *Jan 12, 1955Feb 3, 1959S A T A M Sa Appareillages MecFilling apparatus with an automatic stop
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3224472 *Apr 18, 1963Dec 21, 1965Ehlers KarlheinzLiquid-dispensing nozzle with automatic cutoff
US3233641 *Jan 13, 1964Feb 8, 1966Ehlers KarlheinzLiquid-dispensing nozzle
US5178197 *Jan 2, 1992Jan 12, 1993Healy Systems, Inc.Fuel dispensing nozzle
US5645115 *Sep 6, 1994Jul 8, 1997Dover CorporationDispensing nozzles
EP0472037A1 *Aug 3, 1991Feb 26, 1992OSCAR GOSSLER KG (GMBH & CO)Fuel dispensing nozzle
Classifications
U.S. Classification141/209, 141/225
International ClassificationB67D7/48, B67D7/42
Cooperative ClassificationB67D7/48
European ClassificationB67D7/48