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Publication numberUS3152697 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1964
Filing dateDec 9, 1963
Priority dateDec 9, 1963
Publication numberUS 3152697 A, US 3152697A, US-A-3152697, US3152697 A, US3152697A
InventorsCasper Lee A, Henry Weiss, Jacob Berman
Original AssigneeCasper Lee A, Henry Weiss, Jacob Berman
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Modular dispensing display rack
US 3152697 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 13, 1964 J. BERMAN E-rAl. 3,152,697

MODULAR DISPENSING DISPLAY RACK Filed Dec. 9, 1963 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Oct. 13, 1964 J. BERMAN ETAL 3,152,697

MODULAR DI'sPENsING DISPLAY RACK Filed Dec. 9, 1965 2 Sheets-'Sheet 2 ATT NEYs v 4portant factor.

objects.

l and so that va customer can, absent all United States Patent O 3,152,697 MODULAR DlSPENSlNG DISPLAY RACK Jacob Berman, 7949 Heather Road, Elkins Park, Pa.; Lee A. Casper, SZSCherry Bend, Merian, Pa.; and Henry Weiss, E. 1904 Park Towne Piace, Philadelphia, Pa.

Filed Dec. 9, 1963, Ser. No. 328,927

k8 Claims. (Cl. 211-49) This invention pertains to display racks for uniform cylindrical objects. More particularly, it pertains to modular parallelepipedal devices used for displaying, storing and dispensing a plurality of cylindrical objects.

Self-service stores such as, for instance, food supermarkets carry many items which are packaged in cylindrical containers of substantially uniform size. these items in a manner which is economical volumetrical- Iy, often is done by sacrificing the displaycharacteristics of the grouping and, further, by making it diiiicult for a prospective purchaser to remove but a single item from the display. The problem is particularly aggravated in the case of extremely small cylindrical containers such as are used for spices and condiments.

Attempts have been made in the past to utilize rack structures made with product storage runways, often in the form of internal ramps. Problems have been experi- `enced in these constructionsY because containers have hung up within the structure thus preventing continuous Vdispensing action. Factors contributing to the clogging tendencies of these devices include the dimensionalrclationships between the ramps and the containers resting thereon. Also the fact that allegedly uniform containers varenot truly uniform,` varying among themselves with Storing respect to dimensions and angular relationships, is an im- The ideal structure should-be able to compensate for these differences among allegedly uniform containers and should also make positive provision for preventing hang-up. f

Accordingly, itis an object of this invention toyprovide adispensing display rack which permits storage of substantially uniform cylindrical objects with high volumetric efficiency ploited.

A further object of the invention is toprovide a display rack wherein objects resting on the Vinternal runways ortracksthereof are subjected to continual positive forces .in a downward direction which forces continually urge said objects toward the discharge area ofthe rack.

An addtiional object of thel invention is to provide a modular dispensing rack having internal tracks wherein a vibration occurring on one track segment is transmitted throughout all track seqments thereof to implement gravitational forces which tend to make the stored objects move downward toward the discharge area.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a rack having internal trackways wherein wedging action of a cylindrical object mounted on a track is prevented, by continual self-centering, even though the object may not be a true cylinder and may vary in dimensions and internal angles from other substantially identical cylindrical so that shelf space is fully utilized and extion E.

Itis also an object of the invention to provide a dis- Y pensing display rack wherein the contents are visible so that a person responsible for .keeping the rack stocked can, by inspection, determinewhen refilling is required other indica, determine the 'contentsof the rack.` l p t The invention has as an additional object, the provision of dispensing display racks in modular form so`that an assembly of such racks can be made at the will of the user ,containing a number of modules conforming to the number of dilferentitems beinglstored and dispensed.

ladditional functions as well.

3,i52,697 Patented Oct. 13,l 1964 ICC An equally important object of the invention is to provide a modular dispensing rack wherein the particular cylindrical object next in turn is displayed in an appealing manner, cantilevered forward of the body of the rack so as to serve as a stimulus for customer impulse buying.

An equally important object of the invention is to provide, in connection with modular display racks, indicia holding means for displaying the price and contents of a particular module, which means are a cooperative part of the structure and simultaneously perform several use'- ful functions.

Among the objects of the invention is the provision of a Y rack which automatically makes for continuous stock turnover or rotation so that the `first item inventoried is the first one dispensed.

It is also an object of the invention'to provide atmodular dispensing rack which is Safe touse both from the viewpoint of stability and from the viewpoint ofpresenting to the customer no surfaces or edges which can' cause injury or contusion. i

Other objects of the invention are to provide `an improved rack of the character described that is easily and Yeconomically produced, which is sturdy in construction, of indefinite life, highly eliicient in operation, and pleasing in appearance.

These and other objects of the invention will `be appar- A ent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description of an embodiment thereof, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which.

FIGURE l represents a partially exploded perspective View of an assembly of modular dispensing display racks embodying the invention.

FIGURE 2 represents a plan view of a typicalrnodule of the invention including a typical cylindrical container.

FIGURE 3 represents a longitudinal section taken on line 3-3 through the typical modular unit of FIGURE 2,.

Referring now in greater detail to the drawings, vin which similar reference characters `denote similar parts, there is shown, in FIGURE l, a plurality of identical `modular dispensing racks each designated, generally, 10, 11, 12 and 13. Each module is identical and, consequently, each includes a pair of parallel sidewalls A', a plurality of transverse rigid spacers B aixed between the sidewalls, a plurality of parallel rearwardly extending front tracks C, a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending `rear tracks D which may also include a cantileveredfdelivery por,-

' lSidewalls A which are'upaired mirror images include generally rectangular portions 14 having an integral, in-,

ward facing front flange 15 and an integral inward facing 90 rear flange 16. These anges contribute tothe overall rigidity of the structure and provide smooth outer corners which are safe to touch. Flat portions 14 are provided with a shallow rectangular icut-out portion 17 'proximatetheir lower front corners. This cut-out portion extends in height slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical objects which will be dispensed. Sidewalls A are made of solid vibratable material such as sheet metal, and despite the overall rigidity of the modular structure will flex in response to an internal blow.

Sidewalls A are kept in parallel spaced-apart relationship by transverse spacers B. While all of these spacers perform their stated function, certain of them perform Thus spacer 18 proximate the upper front corner of walls A serves as a cut-preventing guard. Spacer 19 and spacer 2Q which delineate the cut-out portion of sidewalls lA Valso perform a similar safety function. Other spacers, 21, are mounted at locations which will maximize the rigidity of the Structure and, at the same time provide support for tracks rC and D. Each module is provided with a pluralityof parallel junction 27 (between ramps 24 and 25) are in the form `of arcuate apices but, When the junctions are in the front of the rack they include a vertical portion 28 proximate Athe front of the rack and an adjoining sloped portion 29 intermediate vertical portion 28 and adjacent downward ramp 24. It should be noted that sloped portion 29 has a grade steeper than that adjoining ramp 24. As

shown, front tracks C originate proximate spacers 18 and terminate proximate spacers 19. The modules of the invention also include a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks D. These tracks are also mounted von 'spacers 21 and are in co-planar alignment with the front tracks C. Each rear track D is a continuous generally serpentine-shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps 3i), 3l, 32, and 33 inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions. The junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of the rack takes the form of an arcuate apex such as 34 but, when in the rear of the rack includes both a vertical portion such as 35 (adjacent `ramp Si?) and 36 (adjacent ramp 32). Between the vertical portion and the next adjacent downward ramp is a steeply sloped portion suchas 37 (between vertical portionl 35 and ramp 31) and 38 (between portion 36 and rramp 33).

Sloped portions 37 and 33, like portion 29 are provided with a grade steeper than their companion, adjacent, downward ramps (i.e. 3 1 and 3.3). In the particular embodiment shown, ramp 30, which is optional, serves'merely as a guide for cylindrical containers. The slope of Vramp portions 29, 37 and 38 causes the normal force of jars or containers resting thereupon to be resolved `into vectors of force in a direction along the 'companion adjacent downward ramp. Thus the weight of jars at these ramp portions continuously urges abutting jars along the less steeply sloped ramps.

Whilethe ramp may terminate at spacer 2@ and be provided thereabout with stops or detents itis preferred to continue track D in order to provide a cantilevered delivery portion E. This delivery portion which extends beyond the generaly parallelepipedal contines of the module includes track portion 39 which is bent upward as at 40 to form a stop portion or detent.

as shown, mayconveniently take the shape of spheres or balls. Terminals 41 are also protective in nature presenting .only smooth surfaces to a person utilizing the rack.

of elements shown and in their synergistic effect upon each other and while further, its conception and reduction to practice was essentially empirical an attempt will be made to discuss the unique attributes of this invention and to show why objects do not hang up within the embodiments shown.

Allegedly uniform cylindrical objects such as 42 are not truly uniform nor truly cylindrical. Glass: companies such as those-supplying spice jars work to relatively large tolerances. These tolerances affect not only the diameter and the length of the cylindrical objects -but also. whether the ends of the cylinders are truly normal to the longitudinal axis thereof. In prior art constructions a non-normal end would rub against a wire ateneo? 4, n would be a wedging force exerted for which no compensation had been made during the rolling motion of the cylinder. In this embodiment, due to the solid sidewalls, the high spot is always in contact and thus there is a continuous self-centering action which occurs transverse the channel as a given cylinder moves down.

Further, at no point within the channel is one cylinder capable of resting upon another cylinder in such a way as to exert a horizontal wedging action.

Also, straight track length is so related to curved track length that, when the channel is loaded and the cylindrical objects are at rest, no jar will be in a position such that its center of gravity will be behind the transverse moment of force (in the direction of the desired motion) of the preceding abutting jar. Consequently no jamming will occur in the position of rest.

. Finally, the impact of material striking a ramp such as 22 upon Yloading of the module or impact caused by movement of cylinders 42 along the various ramps and against the various vertical portions of the channel are transmitted, via spacers 2, to vibratable sides A. These, in turn, transmit the vibrations to remote portions of the track and produce a continual shaking of the contents which contributes to the non-jamming feature.

Returning now to a consideration of the embodiment shown, provision .is made for assembling -a plurality of modules 10, 1l, l2 and 13 into an integrated unit to suit 'the needs of ya particular unit. This is done simply and quickly by passing aplurality of through-bolts 43 through aligned pre-drilled holes 44 and securing them with nuts 45. Bolts 43 may vary in length depending on the num- 'ber of modules intended to be included in a given assembly. It is also obvious Ithat holes 44 are drilled so that bol-ts 43 will not pass through-the channels.

The. modules may also be provided with a plurality of indicia holders 46 transversely mounted between and axed to walls A. These provide the modules with additional rigidity :and also enable one to display information on price and contents in association with these modules. It should also Abe noted that because of the open front structure the contents of each module can be observed at all times.

' departing from the spirit and scope thereof as defined in Stop portion 40 may also be provided with expanded terminals 41 which,

the appended claims.

'Having described our invention, We claim:

1. A modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing rack `for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a pair' of parallel, generally rectangular, Vertical side walls of solid, vibratable material, said walls being spaced apart -a distance sligh-tly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; transverse spacers aiixed between said side Walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardlyv extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine-shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks, vertically spaced betweensaid side walls and mounted on saidspacers in coplanar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being 'a continuous generally serpentineshaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in altern-ate and'opposite directions; said tracks being spaced apart to define therebetween a channel for yuniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceedingthe diameter of the objects therein, 4rand presenting no location wherein horizontal forces `on said cylinders exceed verticalforces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said guide. As the high spot on the end'came aroundthere 75 tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

2. A modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing rack for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, ver-tical side walls of solid, vibratable m-aterial, said walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; transverse rigid wire spacers aiixed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending fron-t tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine-shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the front of said nack,'including both a vertical portion proximate` the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said` slopedportion havinga grade steeper than that of said adjoining ramp; a plurality of parallel front- Wardly extending rear tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers in co-planar lalignment with said front track, each rear track being a continuous ygenerally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion be-tween said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, saidsloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp; said tracks being spaced apart to detine therebetween a channel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed vertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

3. A modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing rack for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side Walls of solid vibrata'ble material, said Walls fbeing spaced s apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; each having a shallow rectangular cut-out portion proximate its lower front corner which cut-out portion extends in height for a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical objects; transverse rigid wire spacers affixed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the front of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said -adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than that of said adjoining ramp, said front track terminating proximate the top of said cut-out wall portion; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers in coplanar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate v apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp, said rear d track further including a cantilevered delivery portion extending beyond the front of Said rack and stop means for retaining cylindrical objects upon said track; said tracks being spaced apart to define therebetween a chan- Vnel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed verticalV forces; said sides Vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

4. A modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing rack for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side walls of solid vibratable material, said walls spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; each having a shallow rectangular cut-out portion proximate its lower front corner which cut-out portion extends in height for a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical objects; each of said walls further including an integral, inward facing, rear flange and an integral inward facing 90 front iiange except in the area of said cut-out portion; transverse rigid wire spacers aixed between said side Walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the front of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than that of said adjoining ramp, said front track terminating proximate the top of said cut-out wall portion; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers in coplanar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp, said rear track further including a cantilevered delivery portion extending beyond the front of said rack and stop means for retaining cylindrical objects upon said track; said tracks being spaced apart to deiine therebetween a channel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed vertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portionsV of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

5. An assembly of modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing racks for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a plurality of modules each including a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side Walls of solid vibratable material, said walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; transverse spacers a'xed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks,

vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted von said spacers in co-planar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions; and means for securing side walls of adjacent modules in planar juxtaposition; said tracks being spaced apart to define therebetween a channel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed vertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are ropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

6. An assembly of modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing racks for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a plurality of modules each including a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side walls of solid, vibratable material, said walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; transverse rigid wire spacers aiiixed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart realtionship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the iront of said rack, including both a vertical vportion proximate the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than that of said adjoining rampga plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks, verticallyspaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers in coeplanar alignment with said front tracks, each rear trackbeing a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp; and means for securing said walls of adjacent modules in planar juxtaposition; said tracks being spaced apart to deiine therebetween a channel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance between opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed vertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portionsof said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

7. An assembly or modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing racks for substantially uniform cylindrical obpair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side walls of solid, vibratable material, said Walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; each having a shallow rectangular cut-out portion proximate its lower front corner which cut-out portion extends in height for a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical objects; transverse rigid wire spacers affixed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and mounted on said spacers, each front track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the front of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vert-ical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than that of said adjoining ramp, said front track terminating proximate the top of said cut-out wall portion; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending rear tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and Ymounted on said spacers in co-planar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp, said rear trackfurtherincluding a cantilevered delivery portion extending beyond the front of said rack and stop means for retaining cylindrical objects upon said track; and means for securing side walls of adjacent modules in planar juxtaposition; said tracks being spaced apart to deiine therebetween a channel for uniform cylindrical objects, the distance vbetween opposing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the objects therein, and presenting no location wherein horizontal forces on said cylinders exceed vertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

8.V An assembly or modular parallelepipedal storage and dispensing racks for substantially uniform cylindrical objects comprising a plurality o-f Vmodules each including a pair of parallel, generally rectangular, vertical side walls of solid, vibratable material, said walls being spaced apart a distance slightly greater than the length of said cylindrical objects; each having a shallow rectangular cutout portion proximate its lower front corner which cutout portion extends in height for a distance slightly greater than the diameter of the cylindrical objects; each of said walls. further including an integral, inward facing, rear iiange and an integral inward `facing 90 front flange except in the area ofl said cut-out portion; transverse rigid wire spacers affixed between said side walls to keep them in said spaced-apart relationship; a plurality of parallel, rearwardly extending front tracks, vertically spacedy between said side walls and mounted on said spacerse`ach front track being a Ycontinuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the rear of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the front of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the front of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said ver-tical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portionhaving a gr-ade steeper than that of said adjoining ramp, said front track terminating proximate the top of said cut-out wall portion; a plurality of parallel frontwardly extending .rear tracks, vertically spaced between said side walls and ymounted on said spacers invco-planar alignment with said front tracks, each rear track being a continuous generally serpentine shaped rigid wire having a series of ramps inclined downwardly in alternate and opposite directions, the junction of adjacent ramps, when in the front of said rack being an arcuate apex but, when in the rear of said rack, including both a vertical portion proximate the rear of said rack, and an adjoining sloped portion between said vertical portion and said adjacent downward ramp, said sloped portion having a grade steeper than said downward ramp, said rear track further including a cantilevered delivery portion extending beyond the front of said rack and stop means for retaining cylindrical objects ing sides thereof slightly exceeding the diameter of the 5 objects therein, and presenting no location wherein hor-izontal forces on said cylinders exceed yertical forces; said sides vibrating when cylinders are dropped into said channel and transmitting said vibrations to portions of said tracks remote from the origin of said vibrations.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Mason Sept. 16, 1958 Knott May 26, 1959 Hennion Jan. 24, 1961

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2888145 *Dec 30, 1953May 26, 1959Fred Knott JosephBin dispenser
US2969152 *Oct 2, 1957Jan 24, 1961Tyler Refrigeration CorpAutomatic dispenser for canned goods
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3286846 *Dec 2, 1964Nov 22, 1966Brandes ArthurRack for storing and dispensing containers
US3298763 *Feb 8, 1965Jan 17, 1967Di Domenico JosephDevice for dispensing cylindrical articles
US3306688 *Apr 5, 1965Feb 28, 1967Di Domenico JosephArticle dispensing rack
US3318455 *Aug 30, 1965May 9, 1967Century Display Mfg CorpDispensing rack
US3478082 *Oct 29, 1965Nov 11, 1969Lummus CoProcess for the production of acrylonitrile or methacrylonitrile
US3777896 *Aug 12, 1971Dec 11, 1973Ehrlich MCombined display and storage rack
US3938666 *Oct 21, 1974Feb 17, 1976Castleberry William RRack assembly
US4015885 *Mar 1, 1976Apr 5, 1977Tonecraft LimitedDispensing and display device
US4177903 *Dec 21, 1977Dec 11, 1979Amsterdam Brush CompanyPaint brush merchandising display
US4243145 *Jun 9, 1978Jan 6, 1981The American Thread CompanyCassette modules and displays for tubular articles
US4356923 *May 22, 1980Nov 2, 1982Visual Marketing, Inc.Storage and dispensing rack
US4476996 *Feb 12, 1982Oct 16, 1984Moore Jr FranklinRetainer and dispenser for food containers in fast food establishment
US4580696 *Aug 10, 1984Apr 8, 1986Moore Jr FranklinRetainer and dispenser for food containers in fast food establishment
US4785943 *Dec 9, 1986Nov 22, 1988Visual Marketing, Inc.Expandable storage and dispensing system
US6340091 *Jul 27, 1999Jan 22, 2002American Tool Companies, Inc.Product display and dispensing rack
US7690518 *Jul 17, 2007Apr 6, 2010Sonoco Development, Inc.Front-loading rack for displaying and first-in, first-out dispensing of products
US8496124 *Jul 13, 2011Jul 30, 2013Fang-Yin ChenRack with holder sheet members for holding cap-shaped items
US8496125 *Jul 21, 2011Jul 30, 2013Fang-Yin ChenCap-shaped items holder rack
US20130270978 *Apr 16, 2013Oct 17, 2013Amber BlackThermal Paper Roll Holder and Dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/59.2
International ClassificationA47F1/08, A47F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47F1/082
European ClassificationA47F1/08B