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Publication numberUS3152818 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 13, 1964
Filing dateMay 8, 1961
Priority dateMay 8, 1961
Publication numberUS 3152818 A, US 3152818A, US-A-3152818, US3152818 A, US3152818A
InventorsNelson J Ivins
Original AssigneeBastian Blessing Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bracket hold-down device
US 3152818 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 13, 1964 N. J. lVlNS BRACKET HOLD-DOWN DEVICE Filed May 8. 1961 2 SheetsSheet 2 NELSON J. WINS INVENTOR:

United States Patent 3,152,818 BRAQKET HGLD-DQWN DEVICE Nelson .l. Ivins, Spring Lake, Mich., assigncr to The Bastian-Blessing Company, Chicago, 111., acorporation of Illinois Filed May 8, 1961, Ser. No. 108,351 2 Claims. (Q1. 287-20) tions thereof directly exposed on the bracket surface or,

if recessed in the bracket, there still remains the recessed openingon the bracket surface. Considerable dimensional control in the formation of the bracket has been required to insure proper alignment of the bracket when installed since it is often necessary to form openings in both the bracket and the surface to which it is to be secured for receipt'of the screw or bolt members. Further, lack of adjustability, ease of removal and replacement of the bracket, wear and failure of the preformed threaded holes in the base surface with frequent removal andreplacev ment, and lackof desired" strength and positive securement are but a few of the shortcomings of prior holddown devices of this character.

Accordingly, it is. the primary obejct ofthis inventio toprovide an improved hold-down device for securing a bracket to a surface which eliminates the shortcomings and disadvantages of prior devices of this character.

It is a'specific object of this invention to provide an improved hold-down device for securing a bracket to a base surface which is entirely disposed Within the bracket to eliminate exposure of the hold-down members and permits a greater latitude in design of the bracket.

Another object of this invention is .to provide an improved-hold-downdevice that eliminates the necessity of requiring dimensional control of tolerances ofthe bracket to permit properalignment of'the bracket when securing it to a base surface.

A further object of tliis invention it to provide an improved hold-down device for securing a bracket to a base surface which readily permits lateral adjustment of the bracket in any directionyet rigidly securesthe bracket to the surface. V

' A still further object of this invention is to provide'an improved'hold downdevice which is completely hidden from viewyet provides a greater surface'area of contact for securement of the .bracketto -a surface:

Another object of this invention is. to provide. an improved hold-down device for securing a brack'eftoa base surface which readily permits. removaliand. replacement ofthe bracket with-a minimum of eifort; eliminates-the possibilityof marring a finished outer surface during. in stallation and removal, yet 1 affords maximum; positive securementat all-times, when in the hold-down-position, regardless of the number of times of removal and replace:- ment;

Another object of thisfinvention-is toprovide an im' proved hold-down device for securingaa bracketrto a flat surface which is simple, in design, economical to manu facture, rugged in construction, yet "provides positive i securement'of thebrackeL-to a surface.

With these and other objects, in mind, the invention j resides in the combination of par-ts and in the details of construction and'operation hereinafter set forth in the following specification and appended claims, certain emborliments thereof being illustrated in the accompanying 1 jdrawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a partially sectioned view in side elevation illustrating a bracket secured to aflat surface;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary, enlarged, partially sectioned view taken alongthe line 22 of FIG. 1 illustrating the relationship of the preferred embodiment of the holddown device of this invention with a bracket secured to a fiat surface;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary, enlarged, partially sectioned view taken along the line 22 of FIG. 1 illustrating an alternate embodiment of the hold-down device of this invention in relationship'with a bracket secured to a flat surface;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of the bracket taken alongthe line 4-4 of FIG. 1 illustratingthe position of the hold-downmembers of this device when all of the component par-ts. are in perfect alignment;

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view of the bracket taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1 illustrating a'position of the hold-down members of this device to provide lateral and longitudinal adjustment; and

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view of the. bracket taken along the line 4-4 of FIG. 1 illustrating an alternate position of the set screws of this device to provide lateral and longitudinal adjustment.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the preferred embodiment of slot 30 is formed for receipt of a driving instrument to aid in threadably engaging the shank portion 2'4 into the base surface 18. An outer surface 32', about the periphery of the head portion 2 6, extends downwardly at right angles a short distance from the upper surface 28. Extending downwardly and inwardly in tapered fashion from the lower edge of the outer surface 32 is a holding surface 34 which then extends outwardly again, forming inverted conical frustrous, to a diameter equal to the diameter of outer surface 32 to form a flat bearingsurface36. Centrally formed and depending from the bearing surface 36 of the holding :surface 34 is the threaded shank. portion 24.

A cylindrical aperture 52' is formed in the under 'sur-1 face of leg 14 of thebracket to receive the head portion 26 of the studf member 22. The internal diameter ofthe.

aperture. '52. is substantially greater than the' externallegit? ofthe bracket. Hold-down-set screws 42," and 44 .are. threadabl'y engaged in the. apertures 38 and 46.

respectively, and each provide a cone or tip 4'6 which is angularlycontoured to correspond to the. angle of'tapen of the holdingsurface 34; Each of the set screws-4 2 and 44 are preferably provided at their other end with i an internal hexagonal central recess48 to receive a tool to aid' in turning. the set screws into the hold-down position. To aid in the overall design and to enhance theouter-surface of the bracket, a. plug S0,.preferably of plastic, is disposed within the apertures 38 and. ellwith the outer surface thereof flushrwi'th the outer surface of leg 14 Plug 5% if often required and highly desirable to seal off the pockets formed by the threaded apertures 33 and 40 to eliminate the collection of dirt particles therein. 7

7 Referring now more particularly to FIG. 3, an alternate 29 embodiment of the hold-down device of this invention is illustrated. In view of the similarity of corresponding parts of this embodiment with that of the preferred embodiment like numerals have been used to indicate like parts. The variation of this embodiment from that of the preferred embodiment is principally found in the holding surface 34- which provides a continually inwardly tapered surface extending from the outer surface 32 to the bearing surface 36, rather than forming a double-cone shaped contour as in the preferred embodiment. As readily seen by a comparison of FIGS. 2 and 3, the bearing surface 36 of .the embodiment in FIG. 3 is of the same diameter, providing equal surface area in contact with the base surface 18, as the preferred embodiment in FIG. 2 when the stud is fully threaded into the surface 18 but the alternate embodiment of FIG. 3 requires a greater outside diameter of the head portion 25 to provide this equal surface area and still retain the same angle of taper for holding surface 34. The relationship of screw members 42 and 44 with the tapered holding surface 34 is identical to that as described for the preferred embodiment.

Referring now primarily to FIGS. 4, and 6, various alternate positioning of the screw members 42 and 44 relative to the stud member 22 are illustrated to provide lateral displacement of the bracket to procure proper alignment if necessary.

As the angular tips 46 of set screws 42 and 44 engage the inwardly tapered holding surface 34, the axial force created by turning the screw members inwardly will tend to force the tips 46 downwardly along the surface 34 which in turn will draw the bracket downwardly against the base surface as best seen in FIGS 2 and 3.

When the screw members are disposed diametrically opposite each other to contact the stud at its centermost point as seen in FIG. 4, the total force will be directed in a downwardly direction. As seen in FIG. 5, if the screw members are disposed diametrically opposite each other but offset to contact the stud eccentr-ically of its centermost point, the force will not only be directed downwardly to draw the bracket into contact with the base surface but creates a wedging force to eliminate any possible longitudinal movement of the bracket. As readily seen in FIG. 5, the desired wedging force and hold-down forces are attained even if the recess 52 or stud member 22 are inadvertently offset for perfect alignment therebetween. In similar manner, as seen in FIG. 6, the set screws may be offset from one another to engage the stud member on both sides of the center point thereof to create both the downward holding force and a wedging force to align the bracket laterally and longitudinally.

With the internal diameter of the recess 52 being substantially greater than the longest diameter of head portion 26 of stud 22, it is now apparent that the bracket may be readily adjusted in the horizontal plane for proper alignment by varying the amount of penetration of the screws 42 and 44 into the recess 52 for contact with the holding surface 34.

Thus it is seen that the construction of the holddown device of this invention not only simplifies the manufacture of the bracket and lowers the cost for the,

positivesecurement of a bracket to a base surface, but also provides maximum strength and rigidity of securement, permits lateral and longitudinal adjustment of the bracket, permits ready removal and replacement of the bracket, yet is entirely disposed within the bracket, completely hidden from view, permitting greater latitude in design. 3

By the utilization of the stud member as described, assembly time is greatly reduced since all connect-ions and attachment of the bracket is readily accomplished. In many instances it is either physically impossible or else the work space beneath the base surf-aceis so inaccessible that it is impossible to secure the bracket by previous conventional hold-down devices. The construction of the hold-down device of this invention permits complete installation of the bracket on the upper or exposed surface of the base surface in all instances, yet is completely concealed within the bracket.

While the foregoing-specification sets forth the invention in specific terms, it is to be understood that numerous changes in the shape, size and configuration of the component parts may be resorted to without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as claimed hereinafter.

What is claimed:

1. A hold-down device for releasably securing a bracket to a base surface comprising a stud member threadably secured to the base surface, the head portion of said stud providing an upper surface and a lower bearing surface, an angularly contoured surface including an inwardly tapered holding surface and an outwardly tapered surface extending therefrom between said upper surface and said bearing surface, a circular recess formed in the under surface of the bracket to receive the head portion of the stud member, said circular recess having an inside diameter greater than the outside diameter of said head portion of the stud and a pair of locking screw members threadably mounted in the side walls of thebracket, said screw members providing tapered ends for mating engagement with the tapered holding surface of said stud member for securing the bracket to" said base surface, said pair of locking screw members threadably mounted in the side walls of the bracket being disposed diametrically opposite one another but offset to engage the stud member eccentrically of the centermost point thereof.

2. A hold-down device for releasably securing a bracket to a base surface comprising a stud member threadably secured to the base surface, the head portion of said stud providing an upper surface and a lower bearing surface, an angularly contoured surface including an inwardly tapered holding surface and an outwardly tapered surface extending therefrom between said upper surface and said bearing surface, a circular recess formed in the under surface of the bracket to receive the head portion of the stud member, said circular recess having an inside diameter greater than the outside diameter of said head portion of the stud and a pair of locking screw members threadably mounted in the side walls of the bracket, said screw members providing tapered ends for mating engagement with the tapered holding surface of said stud member for securing the bracket to said base surface, said pair of lockingscrew members threadably mounted in the sidewalls of the bracket being offset relative to one another to engage the stud-member on both sides o f'the centermost point of the stud.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Great Britain 1910

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4817239 *Oct 26, 1987Apr 4, 1989Campbell Frank JSanitary door opener assembly
US4912809 *Jan 11, 1985Apr 3, 1990Kawneer Company, Inc.Tandem cone bolt anchor mounting assembly
US5398899 *Feb 3, 1993Mar 21, 1995A-Dec, Inc.Rotation adjustment for dental instrument holder
US5405115 *Sep 16, 1994Apr 11, 1995A-Dec, Inc.Mounting bracket assembly
US5603184 *Jul 17, 1995Feb 18, 1997Sheila R. CampbellSliding door latch having sanitary hook
US5630687 *Jul 24, 1995May 20, 1997Robinson; Robert R.Tamper resistant valve cap
US5797164 *Nov 30, 1995Aug 25, 1998White Consolidated Industries, Inc.Dovetail refrigerator door handle lock
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US6176255Nov 29, 1999Jan 23, 2001Robert R. RobinsonKeyed theft resistant valve cap
US6289557Dec 8, 1999Sep 18, 2001Barry F. MansonSanitary door handle assembly
US6642792 *Mar 21, 2002Nov 4, 2003Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd.Signal amplification device with circuit maintaining potential of input side of current mirror circuit at predetermined value
US7862278 *Sep 2, 2004Jan 4, 2011Michael Keith ChingAnti-tamper device
US7992257 *Jul 3, 2008Aug 9, 2011Lg Electronics Inc.Mounting structure of a door-handle for refrigerator
Classifications
U.S. Classification403/362, 411/378, 411/374, 16/DIG.240, 16/422
International ClassificationE05B1/00, F16B5/12, A47G1/20
Cooperative ClassificationY10S16/24, F16B5/128, E05B1/0015
European ClassificationF16B5/12U, E05B1/00B