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Publication numberUS3153531 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 20, 1964
Filing dateAug 29, 1963
Priority dateAug 29, 1963
Publication numberUS 3153531 A, US 3153531A, US-A-3153531, US3153531 A, US3153531A
InventorsRalph J Cook
Original AssigneeSemco Res Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing cartridge for sealant compound
US 3153531 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 20, 1964 R. J. cooK MIXING CARTRIDGE FOR SEALANT COMPOUND Original Filed July 20. 1959 war/re United States Patent 3,153,531 MIXENG CARTRHDGE FOR SEALANT CUMPOUND Ralph J. Cook, Torrance, Califi, assignor to Semen Research, Inc, Ingiewood, Caiii, a corporation of Qflitornia Application Apr. 24 1962, Ser. No. 190,525, which is a continuation of application er. No. 828,118, .iuiy 20, 1959. Divided and this application Aug. 29, 1963, Ser. No. 305,456

13 Ciaims. (Cl. 259-413) This invention relates to a container for a plurality of separate ingredients that must not be mixed until the time of use, the container being in the form of a cartridge for dispensing mixed ingredients by extrusion.

This application is a division of my copending application Serial No. 190,525, filed April 20, 1962, which in turn is a continuation of my application Serial No. 828,- 118, filed July 20, 1959, and now abandoned.

While the invention is widely applicable for its purpose, it has been initially embodied as a cartridge for a sealant which is compounded at the time of use by mixing a base material with a catalyst or accelerator. Such a sealant is commercially available under the trade name Thiokol. This initial application of the invention has been selected for the purpose of the present disclosure and will provide adequate guidance for those skilled in the art who may have occasion to apply the same principles to other specific purposes.

The ingredients of the sealant oi the character to which the invention pertains are commonly mixed at the point of use, for example, by an apparatus such as disclosed in the Trumbull et al. Patent No. 2,859,017. Once the ingredients are mixed, the sealant must be applied promptly before it hardens or cures to a degree that would make it unusable. The apparatus disclosed in the Trumbull et al. patent is adapted for filling cartridges, each of which comprises a cylindrical plastic shell with a dispensing nozzle at one end and a movable piston-like wall membar at the other end. The cartridge filled with the newly mixed sealant is commonly placed in some type of applicator or dispensing gun for the actual dispensing operation. For example, the dispensing gun may be of the air-powered type disclosed in the Detrie et al. Patent No. 2,838,210.

A problem arises in those situations where a mixing apparatus such as an apparatus of the trumbull patent is not available or where it is not feasible to use such a mixing apparatus. For example, it would be intolerably wasteful to mix a quantity of sealant sufiicient to fill several cartridges if the need to be met within the permissible time period requires no more than a single cartridge.

The invention meets this problem by a multiple-purpose cartridge. The cartridge initially serves as a dual compartment container for storing the two ingredients separately. Subsequently, the cartridge serves as a manually operable means for mixing the two ingredients. Finally, the cartridge serves as means to dispense the mixture by extrusion.

To carry out this concept, the multiple-function ca.- tridge is of the general construction mentioned above comprising a cylindrical shell with a dispensing outlet at one end and a piston-like wall member at the other end to Patented 0st. 20, 1964 force the mixture to extrude through the outlet. In ac cord with the teaching of the invention, the cylindrical shell is divided into two separate ingredient-containing compartments by a transverse partition which may be readily deformed to permit the ingredients to intermix. The invention further provides a dasher inside the cartridge shell and meansoperable through the dispensing outlet to reciprocate the dasher for intermixing the two ingredients. When the two ingredients are thoroughly intermixed, the means for reciprocating the dasher is Withdrawn through the dispensing outlet and a dispensing nozzle is mounted in the dispensing outlet. The cartridge is then ready for use in a dispensing gun.

An important feature of the invention is the manner in which the transverse partition is provided. The invention is characterized by the concept of using a partition in the form of a deformable membrane such as a piece of metal foil and of using the dasher as means to support the membrane until the time arrives for the mixing operation. This concept requires that the metal foil membrane be effectively secured to the dasher during the storage period but to be readily releasable therefrom to permit intermixing of the two ingredients. It will thus be apparent that the membrane effectively engages and cooperates with the shell Wall to form therewith partition means and to define separate compartments of the container, and upon appropriate container manipulation, to deform to accommodate destruction of the partition and subsequent mixing of the contents of the separate compartments. When viewed in this manner, the effective partition is not only the membrane, but the adjacent cooperating portions of the shell wall and the partition is weak and frangible in that the partition is destroyed and admixture accommodated.

This last requirement is met by cupping the metal foil around the dasher with a cylindrical marginal portion of the foil gripped between the periphery of the dasher and the surrounding shell of the cartridge. The required gripping pressure is provided by making the shell fiexible and by tightly encircling the flexible shell with constricting means to press the shell radially inward in the region of the dasher. Such a constricting means may comprise simply adhesive tape wrapped around the cartridge shell.

To get the metal foil partition out of the way in preparation for a mixing operation, the constricting means is removed to release the gripping pressure and the dasher is retracted out of engagement with the metal foil. The flexible cartridge shell is then squeezed manually in the region of the unsupported metal foil to crumple the metal foil to destroy its effectiveness as a barrier between the two ingredients. The dasher is then used to force the crumpled metal foil to a position out of the way against the removable end wall of the cartridge. Thereafter, the dasher may be reciprocated and simultaneously rotated for thorough intermixture of the two ingredients.

As will be made apparent, other features of the invention relate to the construction of the dasher, the construction of the movable end wall of the cartridge, and the manner in which the two ends of the cartridge are sealed to retain the ingredients without leakage until the time arrives for the mixing operation.

The features and advantages of the invention may be 3 understood from the following detailed description taken with the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing, which is to be regarded as merely illustrative:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevation of the presently preferred embodiment of the cartridge with the two separate ingredients stored therein, parts being broken away to show concealed structure;

FIGURE 2 is a perspective view of the dasher;

FIGURE 3 is a similar perspective view of the dasher with the metal foil partition cupped thereon;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary cross-section showing the construction of the cartridge shell in the region of the dispensing opening;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view of the piston-like end wall of the cartridge;

FIGURE 6 is a side elevation of the cartridge after the mixing operation is completed and after the dispensing nozzle is added, a portion of the structure being broken away to show the crumpled metal foil backed against the movable wall of the cartridge; and

FIGURE 7 is a perspective view of an alternate form of dasher that may be employed.

The drawing shows the presently preferred embodiment of the invention in the form of a disposable cartridge for use in an air-powered dispensing gun. The principal parts of the dual compartment cartridge include: a thin walled cylindrical shell It) which is preferably made of a suitable plastic material such as polyethylene, the cylindrical shell being open at one end and being formed at the other end with a neon 12 which defines a dispensing outlet M; an-end wall member 15 slidingly mounted in the open of the shell Ill; a dasher 16 (FIGURE 2); an operating rod 18 for releasable attachment to the dasher, the operating rod having a handle or knob ill on its outer end; and a partition 22 in the form of a thin deformable membrane that is best shown in FIGURE 3.

In the selected embodiment of the invention, the open end of the shell I'll is formed with a rim head 24, as best shown in FIGURE 6. The neck 12 of the shell may be formed with a similar rim head 25 and with an inner circumferential head or rib 26, best shown in FIGURE 4. The inner head. 26 is dimensioned to embrace the operating rod 18 in a fluid-tight manner and is equivalent in function to an O-ring.

In this particular embodiment of the invention, the dispensing outlet 14 is formed with an internal screw thread 28 (FIGURE 4) by means of which a suitable screw-threaded nozzle member may be mounted in the dispensing outlet for the final dispensing operation. FIG- URE 6 shows such a dispensing nozzle 38 mounted in the dispensing outlet I4, the nozzle being made of the same plastic material as the shell.

The end wall member 15 functions in the manner of a plunger or piston in the dispensing operation, the airoperated dispensing gun being adapted to drive the end wall member towards the dispensing outlet to cause the mixed ingredients to be dispensed by extrusion. In the present embodiment of the invention, the end wall member .15. is a cup-shaped member of the configuration shown in FIGURE 5.

The cup-shaped end wall member 15 may be made of any suitable material such as polyethylene and may be formed with a cylindrical portion 32 and a dished portion 34, the cylindrical portion being dimensioned for sliding fit in the shell It and the dished portion being inwardly convex in the direction of the dispensing outlet. A feature of the invention is that the cup-shaped member 15 is formed with a flared thin sharp circumferential lip 35. The lip 35 has an unrestrained diameter greater than the inside diameter of the shell It and, therefore, yieldingly presses radially outward to scrape the inner surface of the shell when the cup-shaped member is advanced relative to the shell.

As best shown in FIGURE 2, thedasher I6 has a central hub portion 36, a cylindrical eripheral portion 33 and a number of integral blade portions 4t! forming a series of openings 42. The dasher I6 is adapted for releasable connection with the operating rod 18 in any suitable manner. In the construction shown, the hub portion 36 of the dasher is formed with an internal screw thread 4 and the operating rod 13 is formed with a compler ientary screw thread (FIGURE 6) for releasable engagement therewith.

The cylindrical peripheral portion 33 of the dasher 16 is dimensioned for scraping contact with the inner cylindrical wall of the shell It), The leading side of the dasher I6 is of concave configuration to conform to the convex inner face of the cup-shaped member 15. Thus the dasher 16 is shaped to make intimate contact with the cupshaped member 15 so that the blade portions 4 9 may scrape the surface of the cup-shaped member when the dasher is rotated while in contact with the cupshaped member. For this purpose, the leading edge surfaces 46 of the blade portions 49 may be of the same curvature as the adjacent convex portion of the cupshaped member 15.

The operating rod 18 may comprise a tubular member of suitable plastic material such as polyethylene with the handle or knob 24 in the form or" an integral flange at the outer end of the tubular member. The inner end of the tubular operating rod may be closed by a suitable plug indicated at 48 in FIGURE 1. Obviously, the operating rod IS may be in the form of a solid rod, if desired.

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated in the drawing, the deformable membrane that comprises the partition 22 is in the form of a circular sheet of foil such as aluminum foil. The metal foil is cupped over the leading face of the dasher 16. That is to say, the metal foil spans the leading face of the dasher and is formed with a cylindrical peripheral flange or marginal portion 541 that snugly embraces the cylindrical peripheral portion 38 of the dasher 16. Thus, the dasher 16 serves initially as means in engagement with the partition membrane 22 to support the membrane and to cooperate with the surrounding shell It) for gripping the peripheral flange 5b of the membrane in a fluid-tight manner.

As heretofore indicated, it is contemplated that suitable means will be providedto immobilize the partitionequipped dasher 16 at an intermediate position to divide the interior of the shell It into two compartments for separately storing the two ingredients. Such an immobilizing means may comprise means embracing the flexible shell 10 and constricting the shell to clamp the peripheral fiange'Sii of the partition membrane against the peripheral surface of the dasher. Any suitable encircling means may be employed for this purpose. In the present embodiment of the invention, a piece of suitable adhesive tape 52 is wound around the shell 14 with sufficient tightness to firmly clamp the dasher 16 in position with the peripheral flange of the partition membrane 22 gripped in a fluid-tight manner.

If the described cartridge is to be stored for any substantial period of time or is to be shipped, it is usually advisable to seal the open end of the shell It) since the cup-shaped member 15 may permit slight leakage. For this purpose, a thin-walled plastic sealing cap 54 may be fitted over the end of the cartridge. The sealing cap 54 is preferably of a well-known type available in commerce which is applied inwet state and shrinks drastically while drying. The shrink-fit of the sealing cap around the rim head 24 of the shell makes a fluid-tight construction.

The manner in which the described cartridge serves its purpose may be readily understood from the foregoing description. FIGURE 1 shows the cartridge with one ingredient 55 on one side of the partition 22 and a second ingredient 56 on the other side of the partition. One of these ingredients, is a base material for the quicksetting sealantand the other ingredient is a catalyst or accelerator. The constricting tape 52 immobilizes the dasher 16 so effectively that the cartridge may be readily shipped in the form shown in FIGURE 1 since more than ordinary force is required against the operating rod 18 to cause displacement of the dasher 16.

When the time arrives for using the sealant, the plastic sealing cap 54 is removed and discarded and the encircling tape 52 is removed to free the dasher 16. The operator then withdraws the operating rod 18 to pull the dasher away from the metal foil partition 22. Since the dasher has the openings 42 formed by the blade portions 40, it may be readily withdrawn through the ingredient 55 but since the metal foil forms a continuous partition across the interior of the shell, the presence of the ingredient 55 prevents its from following the dasher. The axially outward movement of the operating rod 18 tends to form a void in the ingredient 55 with the consequence that ex ternal air pressure on the cup-shaped member 15 forces the cup-shaped member 15 to shift inward. The Whole body of the ingredient 55 and the partition 22 shift with the cup-shaped member.

With the dasher withdrawn from supporting engagement with the metal foil forming the partition membrane 22, the operator merely squeezes the shell in the region of the unsupported metal foil to cause slight crumpling of the metal foil. Since the metal foil has no appreciable resilience, it remains crumpled when the squeezing pressure is terminated to permit the shell 16 to return to its normal cylindrical configuration. This partial crumpling of the metal foil forms an opening for communication between the two chambers in which the two ingredients are stored.

The operator then forces the operating rod 18 all of the way in. The moving dasher encounters the crumpled metal foil, carries the metal foil to the end of the shell and crumples the metal foil against the cup-shaped member in the manner indicated in FIGURE 6.

With the metal foil out of the way, the operator reciprocates the operating rod 18 to reciprocate the dasher 16 over the full length of the interior of the shell 10.

I Preferably the operator rotates the handle at the same time to cause rotation of the dasher simultaneously with the reciprocation of the dasher. Each inward movement of the operating rod 18 displaces a corresponding amount of the contents of the shell 10 with consequent corresponding outward shift of the cup-shaped member 15 and each outward movement of the operating rod causes corresponding inward shift of the cup-shaped member. No appreciable leakage occurs around the cupshaped member, however, because the flared lip 35 acts as a seal with effective scraping action.

When the two ingredients are thoroughly mixed, the operator rams the dasher 16 to the position shown in FIGURE 6 against the crumpled metal foil at the cupshaped end wall member 15, and then disengages and withdraws the operating rod 18. The operator may readily disengage the operating rod 18 from the dasher 16 by simply squeezing the shell 10 in the region of the dasher to immobilize the dasher and by then rotating the handle 20 to unscrew the operating rod from the dasher. The complete withdrawal of the operating rod tends to form a void but the cup-shaped end wall member 15 shifts inward correspondingly, as heretofore explained.

With the operating rod 18 withdrawn, the operator screws the dispensing nozzle into the dispensing outlet 14 and the cartridge is then ready to be placed in the air-powered dispensing gun. The air-powered dispensing gun drives the cup-shaped end wall member 15 inward and eventually forces the end wall member and the accompanying dasher 16 to the outlet end of the shell. The sharp-edged circumferential lip of the cup-shaped end wall member forms an effective seal and scrapes the inner circumferential surface of the shell 10 in the course of the extrusion movement of the end wall.

FIGURE 7 shows a dasher 16a that may be substituted for the dasher 16. The two dashers are of generally similar construction as indicated by the use of corresponding numerals to indicate corresponding parts. The dasher 16a ditfers from the dasher 16 essentially in the fact that the blade portions 40a are canted or pitched. The pitched configuration of the blade portions 40a tends to cause the contents of the cartridge to be rotated if the dasher is reciprocated without rotation. Preferably the dasher is rotated or oscillated in alternate directions during its reciprocation so that the pitch of the blade portions 400: accentuates the rotating effect on the ingredients by rotation of the dasher in one of its two rotary directions.

My description in specific detail of the presently preferred embodiment of the invention will suggest various changes, substitutions and other departures from my disclosure within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

an elongated shell having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

an end wall member closing the other end of the shell and cooperating with the shell to form a container, said container being collapsible to extrude the contents of the shell through said dispensing outlet;

partition means comprising an element spanning the interior of the shell and cooperating therewith to divide the shell into two compartments to respectively store said two ingredients;

said partition means being frangible to accommodate admixture of said two ingredients;

a dasher spanning the interior of said shell, said dasher being initially positioned adjacent said partition in supporting engagement therewith;

and means releasably attachable to said dasher and extending through and slidable axially in said dispensing outlet to move the dasher out of supporting engagement with said partition to permit failure of the unsupported partition means and shifting of the partition means out of the way to permit intermixture of the two ingredients by reciprocation of the dasher.

2. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

in which said releasably attachable means is an elongated member that initially fills and closes said outlet and is dimensioned to be withdrawn through the outlet to open the outlet for a dispensing operation.

3. A combination as set forth in claim 2,

in which said shell is made of plastic material and is formed with an inner circumferential rib in the region of said outlet to embrace said releasably attachable means in a fluid tight manner.

4. A combination as set forth in claim 1,

in which said end wall member is a thin-walled plastic member having a cylindrical portion fitting snugly into the shell and having a dished portion spanning the interior of the shell with the convex side of the dished portion directed towards said dispensing outlet;

and in which said dasher conforms to the dished configuration of said end wall member.

5. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

an elongated shell formed with a dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

an end wall member closing the other end of the shell and cooperating with the shell to form a container, said container being collapsible to extrude the contents of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

means to divide the interior of said shell into two compartmen-ts to store the two ingredients respectively, said means comprising a transverse element extending 7 over the interior of the shell and cooperating with the shell to form a-weak partition; a dasher spanning the interior of said shell, said dasher being initially positioned adjacent said partition in supporting engagement therewith; means initially releasably attached to said dasher to move thedasher out of supporting engagement with said partition to permit failure of the unsupported "partition and shifting of the partition out of the way, said releasably attached means initially extending through said outlet :and closing the outlet; and means to releasably immobilize said dasher at its initial position, said immobilizing means being manually releasablefrom the exterior of the shell.

'6. A combination as set forth in claim 5,

in which said shell is a flexible thin-walled member and in which said immobilizing means encircles said shell in the region of the dasher and constricts the shell to clamp the dasher in place.

7. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

a cylindrical shell of flexible plastic material, said shell being open at one of its ends and being formed with a-dispensing outlet at the other of its ends;

an end wallmember initially closing said open end of the shell, said end wall member being movably mounted in the shell for axial shift to extrude-the contents of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

a dasher slidingly mounted inside said shell and having a continuous circumferential surface for sliding contact with thecurrounding shell, said dasher having an initial position spaced from both ends of the shell;

a transverse partition in the form-of athin readily deformable membrane dividing the interior of said shell into two compartments for storing said two ingredients respectively, said membrane being cupped around the dasher with -a circumferential marginal portion of the membrane interposed between said circumferential surfiace of the shell;

means embracing said shell in the region of said dasher and releasably constricting. the shell to clamp said marginal portion of the membrane in a sealing manner between the shell and said circumferential surface of the dasher;

and an operating rod releasably attached to said dasher for mixing operation thereof and for retracting the dasher from said membrane to permit the membrane to -be deformed and rendered ineifeotive by inward flexure of the shell, said operating rod initially filling and closing sa-id dispensing outlet.

8. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

an elongated shell open atone of its ends and having a normally closed dispensing outlet at the other of its ends;

an end Wall member initially closing said open end of the shell,

said end wall member being movably mounted in the shell for axial shift to extrude the contents of the shell through said dispensing outlet,

said end wall member being a cup-shaped member backed into the end of. said shell,

said cup-shaped member having a thin circumferential flared sharp-edged lip in contact with the inner ciroumferential surface of the shell and directed towards said dispensing outlet;

a partition spanning the interior of said shell and dividing the shell into two compartments to store said two ingredients respectively, said partition being made of thin readily deformable material;

a dasher spanning the interior of said shell, said dasher bei-m initially positioned adjacent said partition in supporting engagement therewith:

and means releasably attach-able to said dasher [and operable through said dispensing outlet to move the dasher out of supporting engagement with said partition to permit deformation of the unsupported partition and shifting of the partition out of the way to permit inter-mixture of the two ingredients by reciprocation of the dasher.

9. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

a frangible cylindrical shell open at one of its ends and formed with a dispensing outlet at the other of its ends;

an end wall member initially closing said open end of the .shell, said end wall member being movably mounted in the shell for axial shift to extrude the contents of the shell out through said dispensing outlet;

means to divide said shell into two compartments to respectively store said two ingredients;

said means comprising a transverse membrane cooperating with the interior of said shell to form a frangible partition;

a dasher spanning the interior of said shell, said dasher being initially positioned adjacent said partition in supporting engagement therewith;

and an operating rod releasably attached to said dasher and initially extending through said dispensing outlet and filling and closing the dispensing outlet in a fluidtight manner;

and sealing means removably embracing said one end of the shell in a fluid-tight manner;

saidpartition being breakable to permit admixture of the ingredients in the respective compartments upon flexure of said cylindrical shell.

10. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

an elongated shell open at one of, its ends and having .a normally closed dispensing outlet at the other-of its ends;

an end wall member initially closing said open end of said shell, said end wall member being movably mounted in the shell for axial shift to extrude the contents of the shell through said dispensing outlet;

9. dasher in said shell;

a membrane initially spanning the interior of the shell and dividing the interior of the shell into two compartments to respectively store said two ingredients;

said membrane cooperating with said shell to form a frangible partition;

said partition being initially in engagement with said dasher and effectively reinforced thereby, said partition being releasable from the dasher to destroy the elfectiveness of the partition in response to retraction of the dasher towards said dispensing outlet;

said vpartition being effectively destroyed by manual manipulation of the shell;

and means releasably attachable to said dasher and operable through said outlet for moving the diasher.

11. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing the two ingredients and later dispensing the mixture, comprising:

an-elongated shell having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

an end wall member closing the other end of the shell and cooperating with the shell to form a container, said container being collapsible to extrude the contents of the shell through said dispensing outlet;

a dasher slidingly spanning the interior of the shell;

a partition sheet spanning the interior of the shell and cooperating therewith and dividing the interior of the shell into two compartments to store said two ingredients respectively, the peripheral margin of said partition sheet embracing said dasher by radially inward pressure from the surrounding shell;

and means operable through one end of the container to retract the dasher from the partition sheet and to reciprocate the dasher;

said partition sheet being frangible upon collapse of said shell to permit admixture of the ingredients.

12. A combination as set forth in claim 11 which includes means to releasably immobilize the dasher at its position of engagement with said partition sheet.

13. A combination as set forth in claim 11 which ineludes means releasably encircling and constricting the References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,881,361 Killman Oct. 4, 1932 2,646,906 Jones July '28, 1953 3,028,052 Archer Apr. 3, 1962

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Referenced by
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US3417971 *Feb 23, 1967Dec 24, 1968David E. SnyderMixing and ejection tool
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US4160602 *Aug 15, 1977Jul 10, 1979Ciba-Geigy AgMulti-chamber pack
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/136, 222/386, 222/129, 222/215, 366/191, 156/500
International ClassificationB65D83/00, B01F13/00, B01F15/02, B65D81/32, B01F15/00, B01F11/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D83/0005, B01F15/0223, B01F15/0205, B01F13/0023, B01F13/002, B65D81/3255, B01F15/00506, B01F15/0212, B01F11/0082
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, B01F13/00K2B4, B01F15/02B20B, B01F15/02B6N, B65D81/32G, B01F11/00N2, B01F15/02B6, B65D83/00A