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Publication numberUS3154196 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 27, 1964
Filing dateApr 30, 1962
Priority dateApr 30, 1962
Publication numberUS 3154196 A, US 3154196A, US-A-3154196, US3154196 A, US3154196A
InventorsHollibaugh Homer J, Loska Jr Stephen J
Original AssigneeHollibaugh Homer J, Loska Jr Stephen J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Broad-based stemmed glassware rack
US 3154196 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct- 27, 1964 s. J. LosKA, JR., ETAL 3,154,196

BROAD-BASED STEMMED GLASSWARE RACK Filed April :50,4 1962 g BY/ ,JM /f/ Q20 MMM 3,154,2i96 BRCSAD-BASE GASS/Ai- RACK Stephen 5. Leske, ir., 1694 YJan Euren Ave., Des iaines, iii., and Homer E. Hollibangh, 32 E. Mediil Ave., Northialre, ill.

Fiied Apr. 3i?, 1952, Ser. No. 199,925 6 Claims. (Cl. 2li- 71) This invention relates to glassware racks. More particularly, it relates to racks for suspending board-based stemmed glassware in an out-of-way position.

The conservation of space within the home has become an ever increasing problem and this is especially true in modern homes and homes of small to moderate sizes. The housewife is harassed more and more to rind adequate space for more and more appliances and the like, particularly in the kitchen and cupboard areas. As a consequence, there is a definite need for devices which will aid in conserving the space which has been provided through the initial home construction.

The modern housewife normally has a supply of relatively expensive broad-based stemmed glassware which is used relatively infrequently. These are usually in the form of goblets, sherbet glasses, etc. Because of their unique configuration and value, they require an unusual amount of space for they must be prevented from being jarred against each other while not in use because such treatment leads to cracking and chipping. 1t is normal for three such pieces of glassware to require an area of shelf or cupboard space equal to that required by a stack of dinner plates. Moreover, it is impossible or at least inadvisable to attempt to utilize the space immediately thereabove because of the ease with which they fracture from bumping, jarring, and the like. Consequently, it is desirable to locate, if possible, such glassware in a safe but out-of-way space, and preferably one which would not normally otherwise be utilized. Our invention is directed toward that end.

Moreover, it is common knowledge among housewives that it is inadvisable to store such glassware in inverted position upon a shelf or panel since movement of one relative to the other induces cracking or chipping. Also it is well recognized that without inversion, there is a definite drainage problem. In addition, if such glassware is stored in upright position, there is a decided tendency toward the collection of dust within the glassware, necessitating washing and wiping thereof each time prior to usage. It is important, therefore, that means be provided for storing such glassware in inverted position. Gur invention overcomes each of these problems. In addition, it does so in a simple and economical manner and at the same time utilizes space normally heretofore unused.

It is a general object of our invention to provide a novel and improved support rack for broad-based stemmed glassware of simple and inexpensive construction and operation.

A more specic object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which can be manufactured simply and inexpensively and which when utilized will accomplish a substantial saving in space.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which when properly mounted will store such glassware in a safe and eiiicient manner in inverted position and in space which is otherwise not normally fully utilized.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is constructed essentially out of rod-like material and preferably of relatively inexpensive wire material throughout.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is capable of manufacture United States Patent O M' 3,154,196 Patented Oct. 27, 1964 ICC very simply and inexpensively of common wire material throughout and through the use of standard existing wire forming machines.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is capable of being stored or packaged in a plurality of numbers in very small compass.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which can be packaged in small compass and shipped very inexpensively.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is so simple in its construction, assembly, and mounting that the housewife can readily accomplish the same without utilizing skilled labor.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is capable of being readily knocked down into minimum compass for storage and shipping and reassembled at will with a minimium of time, eifort, and expense.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack so constructed that the cost of manufacture, shipping, storage, and packaging is reduced to a minimum.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which can be readily adapted to any one of numerous possible lengths as the situation may require.

Another object is to provide a novel and improved stemmed glassware rack which is readily adaptable for being mounted upon uneven surfaces.

These and other objects and advantages of our invention will more fully appear from the following description, made in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters refer to the same or similar parts throughout the several views, and in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of our invention;

FIG. 2 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken along line 2 2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary sectional view of a second embodiment of our invention taken along a line corresponding to line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a piece of rod-like wire material from which the end brackets are formed, a medial portion of the wire having been broken away;

FIG. 5 is an elevational view of the same piece of wire shown in FIG. 4 after it has been subjected to the first step in the formation of the end bracket by a wire forming machine;

FIG. 6 is an elevational view of the same wire shown in FIGS. 4 and 5 after it has been subjected to the second step in the formation of the end bracket by a wire forming machine;

FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the same piece of wire shown in FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 after it has been subjected to the third step in the formation of the end bracket by a wire forming machine; and

FIG. 8 is an elevational View displaying one of our glassware racks mounted within a cupboard to illustrate the manner in which a substantial saving in space is eifected through its use.

One embodiment of our invention is illustrated in FIG. l. As shown, the rack indicated generally by the numeral l@ is comprised of a pair of elongated rigid wire rails 1i and 12 which are substantially equal in length and extend in closely spaced parallel relation. Fixedly secured to the ends of the two rails 11 and 12 as shown is a pair of end brackets indicated generally by the numerals 13 and 14. These mounting brackets 13 and 14 may be secured to the ends of the rails 11 and 12 in any suitable manner such as spot welding. Reference to FIG. 2 illusto facilitate nesting of the same so that they may be packaged in small compass.

Reference to FIGS. 4-7, inclusive, will show how the end brackets 13 and 14 are formed. A length of rod-like wire material such as indicated by the numeral 15 is fed into a wire forming machine .to shape the same into a generally U-shaped configuration as shown in F1GQ5 and identified by the numeral 16. It will be noted that the brackets 13 and 1d are each generally U-shaped and have legs 17 and 18 which are spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between the parallel wire rails 11 and 12. The outer end portions of the legs 17 and 18 which are identified by the numerals 19 and 20 are each bent inwardly toward the rails 11 and 12 and connected thereto in supporting relation to the corresponding ends of said rails by spot welding. HG. 6 illustrates the U-shaped configuration 16 after it has been fed into a wire forming machine to bend the end portions 19 and 2@ inwardly as shown. lt will be noted, however, that the length of the base portion 22 still exceeds twice the distance between the end portions 19 and 20, as well as the distance across the outer transverse confines of rails 11 and 12 when the latter are welded thereto as shown in FIGS. l and 2.

The next step in the formation ofthe end brackets is to form the securing means or loop 21 from the intermediate portion of the base portion 22. This is accomplished by a standard wire forming machine with the net elect that the end portions A19 and 20 are brought together more closely than as viewed in FIG. 6 since the loop 21 is formed from the medial area of the base portion 22 of the U-shaped bracket.

The second and preferred embodiment of our invention is illustrated in FIG. 3. This embodiment is highly similar in construction to that shown in FG. l with the exception that the rails, only one 24 of which is illustrated are scored at various points along their length as indicated by the numeral 25 for a purpose to be hereinafter described. The only other `diiierence in the construction of the prepreferred form is that instead of welding 'the rails to the end brackets -13Vand 14, the inner ends of the portions 19 and 2() of the bracketsare secured to these rails by means of a small cylindrical polyethylene or similar plastic plug 26. This plug 26 has two diametrically extending bores which extend normal to each other. One of these bores 27 accommodates the end portion 19 or 2t) as the case may be of the bracket while the other bore 28 accommodatesthe end portion of one of the rails such as 24. This form of our invention has the advantage that it can be readily modified to any one of a number of lengths as may be desired by simply sliding one of the rigid rod-like members 24 into a relatively close fitting metal tubular member (not shown) and breaking off the rod-like member 24 at one of the scored positions 25 so as to provide a rail of the desired length. When two such rails of such length have been prepared, the ends thereof are inserted into one of the polyethylene plugs 26 and the corresponding end portion of the mounting bracket is inserted in the other bore 27. When the end of each of the pair of rails has been secured to one of the end portions of one of the mounting brackets in this manner, the glassware rack is ready for mounting-in a manner such as is shown in FIG. 8.

The mounting of the glassware rack disclosed herein is a very simple matter for a simple screw such as is indicated by the numeral 29 may be applied through the loop Z1 of each of the brackets 13 and 14 so as to rigidly secure these brackets to the underside of a panel such as is indicated by the numeral 31) so as to enable the same to store the glassware as illustrated. The type of glassware with which these glassware racks are intended to be utilized is illustrated in FIG. 8. It will be noted that it is 4 characterized by a relatively broad base 31 and a relatively narrow stem 32.

In use the glassware is slid endwise through the entrance defined by one of the brackets 13 and 14 so that the broad base 31 will rest upon the upper surface of the rails 11 and 12 as illustrated. It will be noted that each of the mounting brackets denne an entrance identified by the numeral 33 and it is through this entrance that the bases 31 of the goblets are inserted. It will be noted that a plurality of such glassware racks may be mounted immediately adjacent to each other without danger of the glasses coming in contact. The number of goblets which may be so supported depends, of course, upon the length of the rails 11 and 12 which are chosen.

As described previously, the embodiment disclosed in FG. 3 has certain advantages over that disclosed in FIG. l. The embodiment shown in FIG. 3 can be modiiied prior to mounting to any desired length. In addition, it can be manufactured more cheaply since the steps of spot welding have been eliminated. Moreover, it can be knocked down more completely and shipped in that condition so as to conserve space and reduce the cost of packaging. Moreover, it may be marketed with considerably less shelf space.

It will be noted that the embodiment shown in FIG. l has the leg portions 17 and 18 extending obliquely upwardly from the rails 11 and 12. This enables a plurality of the glass racks to be nested for shipment and storage in small compass.

t will also be noted that substantially our entire glassware rack can be manufactured of readily available and relatively inexpensive wire material. Moreover, the construction of the same can be accomplished at a minimum expense for each of its elements can be formed through the use of existing standard wire forming machinery. The relatively low cost of the wire material and the high rapidity with which the elements of these glassware racks can be formed permits the manufacture, constructiomand assembly of these glassware racks to'be accomplished with a minimum of time, effort, and expense. Consequently these glassware racks can be furnished to the housewife at a very low cost.

The minimum of cost involved in the production of these glassware racks, however, are only one of their desirable features. Even more important than their inexpensive nature is the fact that through the use of these glassware racks broad-based stemmed glassware may now be stored readily, easily and simply in a safe area which heretofore has been normally not utilized to any great extent if at all. Reference to FIG. 8 best illustrates how the area which normally exists above a stack of dishes may be utilized to store such glassware safely, economically, and in an out-of-way position. Moreover, the glassware when stored in this manner does not tend to collect dust nor to be chipped or cracked as is the case when they are stored in an upright position upon the upper surface of a panel. Moreover, these glasswareV racks enable the glassware to be stored in an inverted position without the normally attendant tendency for such glassware to chip and crack when the weight of the glassware is borne by the upper edges of the glassware such as is the case when they are stored in inverted position upon the upper surface of a cupboard panel.

The embodiment shown in FIG. 3 has an additional advantage in that the brackets 13 and 14 may pivot about an axis extending transversely of the rails such as is indicated by the numeral 24. This enables the glassware rack to be utilized with surfaces which are not truly level or do not extend in a single plane. An vadditional feature of the embodiment shown in FIG. 3 is that the transverse spacing of the rails may be readily adjusted by merely varying the extent to which the polyethylene plugs 26 are slid onto the end portions 19 and 20 of the mounting bracket and/or by scoring the end portions 19 and 20 and breaking them as described above with respect Y-to the rails 11 and 12. Thus `the embodiment shown in FIG. 3 can be adapted for dilerent uses since it can be varied to accommodate stems of dilerent diameters. Consequently this embodiment may be readily adapted for different uses such as graduated laboratory cylinders and the like.

Thus it can be seen that we have provided a novel and improved glassware rack of very simple and inexpensive construction which has deiinitevadvantages which are provided through its utilization.

It will, of course, be understood that various changes may be made in the form, details, arrangement and proportions of the parts without departing from the scope of our invention which consists of the matter shown and described herein and set forth in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. An essentially all-wire broad-based stemmed glass- Ware rack comprising:

(a) a pair of elongated rigid wire rails of substantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of generally U-shaped rigid wire mounting brackets each having a base portion and a pair of legs having end portions remote from said base portion;

(c) the legs of said U-shaped brackets being spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between said parallel wire rails;

(d) each of said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and having its leg end portions bent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation to corresponding ends of said rails;

(e) securing means associated with said base portion of each of said brackets for securing the same to the underside of a panel;

(f) and, a plurality of plug connectors, one each of which is disposed between one of said end portions and one of said rails and connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from said brackets.

2. An essentially all-wire broad-based stemmed glassware rack comprising:

(a) a pair of elongated rigid wire rails of substantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of generally U-shaped rigid wire mounting brackets each having a base portion and a pair of legs having end portions remote from said base portions;

(c) the legs of said U-shaped brackets being spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between said parallel wire rails;

(d) each of said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and having its leg end portions bent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation to corresponding ends of said rails;

(e) securing means associated with said base portion of each of said brackets for securing the same to the underside of a panel;

(f) and, a plurality of connector bodies, one each of which is disposed between one of said end portions and one of said rails and releasably connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from said brackets, each of said connector bodies having a bore therein receiving the end of said rail therein in a tight-itting friction yit and having a second bore therein extending transversely of the axis of said iirst mentioned bore and receiving said bracket leg end portion therein in a tight-iitting friction iit.

3. An essentially all-Wire broad-based stemmed glassware rack comprising:

(a) a pair of elongated rigid wire rails of substantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of generally U-shaped rigid wire mounting brackets each having a base portion and a pair of legs having end portions remote from said base portion;

(c) the legs of said U-shaped brackets being spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between said parallel wire rails;

(d) each of said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and having its leg end portions bent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation to corresponding ends of said rails;

(e) securing means associated with said base portion of each of said brackets for securing the same to the underside of a panel;

(f) and a plurality of connector bodies, one each of which is disposed between one of said end portions and one of said rails and releasably connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from said brackets, each of said connector bodies having a bore therein receiving the end of said rail therein in a tight-tting friction iit and having a second bore therein extending transversely of the axis of said iirst mentioned bore and receiving said bracket leg end portion therein in a tight-fitting friction tit, said connector bodies being comprised of plugs formed of polyethylene or similar material.

4. An essentially all-wire broad-based stemmed glassware rack comprising:

(a) `a pair of elongated rigid wire rails of susbtantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of ryenerally U-shaped rigid wire mounting brackets each having a base portion and a pair of legs having end portions remote from said base portion;

(c) the legs of said U-sbaped brackets being spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between said parallel wire rails;

(d) each of said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and having its leg end portions bent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation to corresponding ends of said rails;

(e) securing means associated with said base portion `of each of said brackets for securing `the same to the under-side of a panel;

(f) and a plurality of connector bodies one each of which is disposed between one of said end portions and one of said rails and releasably connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from said brackets each of said connector bodies having a bore therein receiving the end of said rail therein in a tight-fitting friction t and having a second bore therein extending transversely of the axis of said rst mentioned bore and receiving said bracket leg end portion therein in a tight-fitting friction t;

(g) said brackets being free to swing relative to said rails Vabout the transverse axis of said end portions.

5. An essentially all-wire broad-based stemmed glassware rack comprising:

(a) a pair of elongated rigid wire rails of substantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of generally inverted U-shaped rigid wire mounting brackets each having a base portion and a pair of legs having end portions remote from said base portion;

(c) the legs of said U-shaped brackets being spaced from each other a distance substantially greater than the spacing between said parallel wire rails;

(d) each of said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and having its leg end portions bent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation to corresponding ends of said rails;

(e) securing means associated with said base portion of keach of said brackets for securing the same to the underside of a panel;

(j) and aplurality of connector members having openings therein and one each of which is disposed between one of said end portions and oneof said .rails and connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from .said brackets.

6. Arack designed for Vsupporting broad-based stemmed glassware in inverted stored position and formed substantially entirely vof small diameter .rod-like material, said rack comprising:

(a) a pair of elongated rigid generally inverted U- shaped wire rails of substantially equal length extending in closely spaced parallel relation;

(b) a pair of rigid mounting brackets each having an elongated base portion and a pair of ,legs one each of which extends inwardly from opposite ends of said base portion and toward the `other leg in remote relation to said base portion;

(c) said base portions of said brackets :being `of substantially greater length `than the spacing between said parallel Wire rails;

(d) eachtof said brackets being disposed at opposite ends of said rails and havingritsleg end portionsrbent inwardly toward said rails and connected in supporting relation tocorresponding ends of said rails;

(e) and a plurality of cylindrical connectors one each of which is disposed between one of said leg end p0rtions and one of said railsrand connects the same to cooperatively support said rails from said brackets.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 383,092 Baker May 22, 1888 2,600,096 Cooper et al June 10, 1952 2,925,919 Wilson Feb. 23, 1960 3,022,899 Unsworth Feb. 27, 1962

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US383092 *May 22, 1888 Goblet-holder
US2600096 *Feb 7, 1946Jun 10, 1952Berg Earl LCup rack
US2925919 *Jun 18, 1956Feb 23, 1960Banner Metals IncNesting and stacking trays
US3022899 *Mar 8, 1960Feb 27, 1962Unsworth Alan RRacks for holding wine glasses and like articles
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3390905 *Sep 13, 1965Jul 2, 1968Arnott Stewart DonaldHolding and locating devices for overlapping structural members
US3568850 *Mar 28, 1969Mar 9, 1971Rogers Joseph MCup hanger
US4133432 *Oct 4, 1976Jan 9, 1979Den Blaker William EGoblet-type receptacle holder
US4228905 *Nov 29, 1978Oct 21, 1980Cammarota David FStemware shelf bracket
US5711436 *Jul 12, 1995Jan 27, 1998ScanwoodCombination drinking glass and wine glass rack
US6631812 *Oct 30, 2001Oct 14, 2003Emilio RuizStemware suspenders
US7900782 *Dec 10, 2008Mar 8, 2011Elisa GoserudApparatus for the storage of stemware
US20120006770 *Jul 6, 2010Jan 12, 2012Fang-Yin ChenCap-shaped object rack
WO1992012652A1 *Jan 20, 1992Aug 6, 1992Handelsbelangen Hoogeveen B VStemware console
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/41.2, 248/311.3, D07/704, 248/302, 108/29, 211/106, 248/310, 211/119
International ClassificationA47G23/02, A47G23/00, A47B81/00, A47B81/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G23/0208, A47B81/04
European ClassificationA47B81/04, A47G23/02A