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Publication numberUS3155425 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1964
Filing dateJun 12, 1963
Priority dateJun 12, 1963
Publication numberUS 3155425 A, US 3155425A, US-A-3155425, US3155425 A, US3155425A
InventorsJr Louis R Chreist
Original AssigneeSouth Bend Toy Mfg Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Convertible chair for dolls and infants
US 3155425 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 3, 1964 R. CHREIST, JR

CONVERTIBLE CHAIR FOR DOLLS AND INFANTS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 12, 1963 f\ w R r a J A: ws 1 6 7 1R 8 w 6 w Y E R I M O I S T w T. s 0 w A 1964 L. R. CHREIST, JR 3,155,425

CONVERTIBLE CHAIR FOR DOLLS AND INFANTS Filed June 12, 1963 3 Shee ts-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. LOUIS R. CHREIST Jr.

QIQJ MJM ATTORNEYS Nov. 3, 1964 L. R. CHREIST, JR

CONVERTIBLE CHAIR FOR DOLLS AND INFANTS Filed June 12, 1963 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR LOUIS R. CHREIST Jr. WMQM 4M ATTORN EYS United States Patent Office 3,155,425 Patented Nov. 3, 1964 3 155 425 con vnnrrnrln errant re n norms AND INFANTS Louis R. Chreist, .hx, South Bend, Ind, assignor to South Bend loy Manufacturing Company, Inc, South Bend, End, a corporation of Indiana Filed lune 12, 1963, Ser. No. 287,313 12 Claims. (Cl. 297-431) The present invention relates to a convertible chair for dolls or infants, and more particularly to a chair which may easily be converted for use as a car seat.

Baby or doll chairs are conventionally used the same as the adult counterparts and primarily differ as to con struction in size. In transporting infants in automobiles it is conventional to use car seats provided with strap-like supports which can be hooked over the backrest of an automobile seat. The infant is carried in the seat and is usually strapped in place so that sudden braking, swerving or other movement will not throw the infant from the seat. Since infants chairs and car seats are conventionally two separate items, this has required a double investment in furniture.

It is an object of this invention to provide a convertible chair which is usable alternatively either as a car seat or as a conventional chair.

It is another object of this invention to provide a convertible chair wherein supports are provided for converting the chair to a car seat, these same supports being operable to convert the chair to a rocker.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a chair construction which may be simply and easily converted to a car seat, a rocking chair, a reclining chair, and an ordinary chair.

Other objects will become apparent as the description proceeds.

The above-mentioned and other features and objects of this invention and the manner of attaining them will become more apparent and the invention itself will be best understood by reference to the following description of an embodiment of the invention taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation of one embodiment of this invention;

FIG. 2 is a rear elevation thereof;

FIG. 3 is a bottom view thereof;

FIG. 4a is an enlarged fragmentary sectional illustration taken substantially along section line 4- of FIG. 3, of the means for fastening the wire rocker in place;

FIG. 4b is a fragmentary front elevation of another embodiment of the chair;

FIG. 40 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along section line ic-4c of FIG. 412;

FIG. 5 is a sectional illustration taken substantially along section line 5-5 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the wire support of the preceding figure;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary, rear view of an alternative hinge connection;

FIG. 8 is a sectional view taken substantially along section line 8-8 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a side view of the present invention used as a car seat; and

FIG. 10 is a side View of the present invention used as a reclining chair or sleeper.

Referring to the drawings, and more particularly to FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, a solid chair fabricated of either wood or plastic is shown as comprising a backrest ltl, opposite lateral sides 12 and 14, and a seat 16 which is secured to the sides 14 and backrest It). The sides 12 and 14 preferably extend below the seat 16 and are so shaped as to provide four feet 18 adapted to engage a floor surface for supporting the chair in an upright position.

Secured to the rear side of backrest 10 are a pair of screw type eyelets 24 which are positioned in about the midportion of the backrest 10 between the upper and lower edges thereof as shown. These eyelets 22 and 24 are horizontally spaced and positioned adjacent to the sides 12 and 14, respectively, and furthermore are arranged upright to provide openings which are concentric about a single horizontal axis.

A supporting element, shown in detail in FIG. 6, is in one working embodiment of this invention formed of relatively stiff aluminum or steel wire of about No. 8 or 10 gauge and is pivotally inserted into said openings as shown. Obviously, dilferent gauges may be used providing the resulting structure is strong enough to serve the purposes which will be explained more fully hereinafter. Also, instead of using material of round cross-section, flat, steel strip stock may also be used, as will become apparent from the following description.

This supporting element, indicated generally by reference numeral 26, is preferably bent from a single length of wire to the shape shown in FIG. 6. In this shape it has two straight upright portions 23 and 30 which are horizontally spaced apart, parallel and otherwise of identical size and construction. The upper ends of these two portions 28 and 30 are bent horizontally outwardly at 32 and 34, respectively, into shaft or end portions. Shaft portions 32 and 34 preferably are coaxial with a common horizontal axis and are inserted, respectively, through the openings of eyelets 22 and 24.

Two surface-engaging or rocker portions generally indicated by the numerals 36 and 353, respectively, are joined to the lower extremities of the upright portions 23 and 30, respectively. These rocker portions 36 and 38 are generally curved as shown to the shape of a conventional rocker, and at the opposite ends thereof are provided with reflex bends 4t 42, 44 and 45, respectively. The

bends 4t) and 42 on the rocker portion 36 curve inwardly toward each other and preferably lie in a common upright plane with the upright portion 28 and rocker portion as. The same co-planar arrangement obtains with respect to the rocker portion 38, the bends 44 and 46, and the upright portion 30. The rear bends 4t and 44 of the two rocker portions 36 and 38, respectively, join, in smoothly curving portions 48 and 56, respectively, the lower extremities of the upright portions 28 and 30. The front bends {i2 and 46, respectively, are joined at their upper extremities by a cross-bar 52 which preferably is straight and horizontal. The upri ht planes of the portions 28, 4t 35, 42 on the one hand and 36, 44, 38, 46 on the other hand are horizontally spaced apart and substantially parallel. As will appear from the following description, these planes do not have to be precisely parallel, but instead may angle inwardly toward each other as shown more clearly in FIG. 3, the degree of parallelism corresponding in the main to conventional parallel and angular relationships between rockers of ordinary chairs.

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 5, the bends 44 and 46, respectively, project rearwardly of backrest l0 and forwardly of the front edge 54 of seat 16, respectively. Also, the front bends 42, 46 preferably extend forwardly of the front edges 56 of the chair sides 12 and 14. Rocker portions 36 and 38 are symmetrically positioned horizontally beneath the chair feet 18 as shown more clearly in FIGS. 1 and 5, with the upright portions 28 and 30 extending upwardly in substantial parallelism with backrest it The upper end portions 32 and 34 are received by the opening in the eyelets 22 and 2 as shown. The crossbar 52 is engaged with the underside 53 of seat 16 adjacent to the front edge 54, and extends laterally between sides 12 and 14. A screw 66 is partially threaded into seat 16 as shown more clearly in FIG. 4a and is provided with a head 62 spaced slightly from the underside 58. Cross-bar 52 is engaged with the shank of the screw 60 and is frictionally received in the space provided between the head 62 and underside 58.

With crossbar 52 engaged with screw 60, the supporting element 26 is firmly secured to the chair proper. An alternative arrangement for securing the crossbar 52 to seat 16 is shown in FIGS. 4b, 40 wherein a plastic riblike member 64 depends from the underside 58 of the seat and is provided with a notch 65 which receives the crossbar 52. The member 64- is set at an angle and has a short projection 67 which is frictionally engaged by the. crossbar 52 for retaining the rocker 26 assembled to the underside 58. Instead of using eyelets 22 and 24, openings 29 are formed in fianges 31 which extend rearwardly from the sides of backrest lit). The shaft portions 32, 34 are passed through these openings 29 the same as through the eyelets 22, 24 if these were used.

Element 26 as shown in FIG. 6 is preformed to the shape shown and described in the foregoing and is relatively strong and resilient. In the preforrning thereof, the dimensions are made such that when the supporting element 26 is mounted on the chair as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 5, the element 26 will be secured between the backrest 10 and the seat 16 by engagement with the screw 60, respectively. Further than this, the underside 58 of seat 16 adjacent to the front seat edge 54- is sloped downwardly such that while the chair is being used, the upper ends of the front bends 42 and 46 and the crossbar 52 cannot slide forwardly.

The shapes of the front and rear ends of the rocker portions 36 and 38, respectively, are substantially as shown in the drawings, and resemble a compromise between the shapes of the letters V and U. The front and rear ends project far enough beyond the front and rear portions, respectively, of the chair so as to render the latter stable when the chair is used as a rocker. The upright portions 28 and 30 are spaced rearwardly of and substantially parallel to the backrest It). By means of this arrangement, the upright portions 28 and 30 are held substantially upright to serve as legs or struts when the chair is being used as a rocker.

As will now be obvious, with the supporting element 26 mounted on the chair as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 5, the chair is converted into a rocker. The strength of the material used for the supporting element 26 obviously, therefore, must be strong enough to support an occupant of the chair.

As shown in FIG. 9, the arrangement of the preceding figures may easily be converted into a car seat. This is accomplished by merely detaching the crossbar 52 from the screw 60 or U-shaped retainer 64 and swinging the entire supporting element 26 rearwardly about its hinge connection with eyelets 22, 24 until it assumes the position shown in FIG. 9. In this position, the rocker portions 36 and 38 extend upwardly and rearwardly of the backrest 10 and form a hook-shaped member which hooks over the top edge of the automobile seat backrest 66. The spacing between the crossbar 52 and the joining portions 48 and 50 is substantially equal to the thickness of the backrest 66 as shown such that the latter is straddled by the hook-shaped member. The upper edge of the backrest 10 engages the upright portions 28 and 34 while the lower portions 68 of the chair engage the lower regions of the backrest 66 such that the chair cannot tilt forward y. A doll or infant seated in the chair mounted as shown in FIG. 9 is firmly and safely supported. For purposes of comfort, the chair sides 12 and 14 are provided with arm rests 70.

As shown in FIG. 10, the construction described in the foregoing may be converted for use as a reclining chair or sleeper. Used as such, the chair is titlted rearwardly until the front ends 42, 46 of the rocker portions 36 and 33 engage a floor or supporting surface 72. Being so inclined, the rear feet 18 of the chair also engage the floor. The upright portions 2%, 34 of the supporting element 26 are engaged by the upper edge or portion 74 of the backrest It? to thereby serve as a support. Here again, the supporting element 26 is made sufficiently strong so as to support an occupant of the chair when it is reclined as shown.

When it is desired to use the seat of FIGS. 9 and 10 as a rocker, it is only necessary to swing the supporting element 26 to the position shown in FIGS. 1 and 5 and snap the cross-bar 52 under the head of the screw 69 or into the space of the clamp 64. Alternatively, if it is desired to use the chair as a stationary chair, and not as a rocker, it is oniy necessary to rest the chair on a supporting surface, such as surface 72, with the feet 18 in engagement therewith. In this case, the supporting element 26 would be swung to the rear and would rest on the floor surface. Still further, by merely squeezing the upright portions 28 and 3%) together, as viewed in FIG. 2, the shaft portions 32 and 34 can be disengaged from the eyelets 22 and 20 for thereby quickly transforming the structure into a conventional stationary chair.

As will now be apparent, the construction herein disclosed is capable of bein converted to four different, alternative arrangements in a facile and expeditious manner. As shown in FIG. 1, it is a rocker; in FIG. 9 it is a car seat; in FIG. 10 it is a recliner; and with the supporting element 26 removed, the arrangement becomes a conventional chair. By tying the front ends 42 and 46 of the supporting element 26 together by means of the single cross-bar 52, the supporting element 26 is made into a single, unitary structure whereby all of the various parts thereof are easily and convenienhy maintained in proper operative relationship regardless of the use to which the arrangement is to be put. This not only simplifies manipulation of the supporting element 26 but also assures stability and strength as required.

While I have described above the principles of my invention in connection with specific apparatus, it is to be clearly understood that this description is made only by way of example and not as a limitation to the scope of my invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A convertible chair comprising upright lateral sides and a backrest having a seat secured thereto, said seat extending forwardly from said backrest to the forward edges of said sides, said sides having arm rests thereon and said backrest extending upwardly from said arm rests, four horizontally spaced feet on the lower extremities of said sides for resting on a supporting surface, a pair of horizontally spaced eyelets secured to the rear of said backrest and extending rearwardly thereof, said eyelets being positioned adjacent to the lateral edges of said backrest and having horizontally aligned openings, said eyelets further being positioned on said backrest in the vertical mid-portion thereof, a supportingwire element having two horizontally spaced substantially parallel upright portions, said upright portions being disposed rearwardly of said backrest, the upper extremities of said upright portions having oppositely outwardly extending shaft portions which removably pass through the openings of said eyelets, respectively, said shaft portions also extending substantially horizontally to thereby engage said eyelets, respectively, as supports, said element further including two curved rocker portions which join to the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, each rocker portion and its upright portion defining a common upright plane, the two planes of said rocker and upright portions being horizontally spaced apart and disposed adjacent to and between said sides, said rocker portions each having front and rear ends shaped as reflex curves, the bights of the forward ones of said reflex curves being disposed forwardly of said seat and sides, the bights of the rear ones of said reflex curves being disposed rearwardly of said backrest and said upright portions, said front and rear ends curving upwardly from the intermediate portions of said rocker portions, respectively, the upper extremities of said curved rear ends smoothly joining in curved portions the lower extremities of said upright portions, re spectively, said element further including a horizontally extending cross-bar which is integrally connected at its opposite ends to the upper extremities of said curved front ends, said cross-bar extending in a lateral direction between said sides and engaging the underside of said seat adjacent to the front edge of the latter, a retaining member which includes a screw threaded into the underside of said seat having a shank which engages the midportion of said cross-bar on the aft side of the latter, said screw having a head which at least partially overlies said cross-bar, the intermediate portions of said rocker portions having rocker-shaped curvatures and being spaced below said seat and sides to serve as supporting rockers, said cross-bar being disengageable from said retaining member and said supporting-wire element being swingable rearwardly in said eyelets to a second position at which said upright portions are engageable with the upper portion of said backrest and said rocker portions extend rearwardly of said backrest to serve either as hooks for a car seat or as legs for a backwardly tilted chair, said element being preformed to retain yieldably said end portions of said upright portions in supporting engagement with said eyelets.

2. A convertible chair comprising upright lateral sides and a backrest having a seat secured thereto, said seat extending forwardly from said backrest to the forward edges of said sides, said sides having arm rests thereon and said backrest extending upwardly from said arm rests, four horizontally spaced feet on the lower extremities of said sides for resting on a supporting surface, a pair of horizontally spaced eyelets secured to the rear of said backrest and extending rearwardly thereof, said eyelets being positioned adjacent to the lateral edges of said backrest and having horizontally aligned openings, said eyelets further being positioned on said backrest in the vertical mid-portion thereof, a supportingwire element having two horizontally spaced substantially parallel upright portions, said upright portions being disposed rearwardly of said backrest, the upper extremities of said upright portions having oppositely outwardly extending end portions which removably pass through the openings of said eyelets, respectively, said end portions also extending substantially horizontally to thereby engage said eyelets, respectively, as supports, said element further including two curved rocker portions which join to the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, each rocker portion and its upright portion defining a common upright plane, the two planes of said rocker and upright portions being horizontally spaced apart and disposed adjacent to said sides, said rocker portions each having front and rear ends shaped as reflex curves, the bights of the forward ones of said reflex curves being disposed forwardly of said seat and sides, the bights of the rear ones of said reflex curves being disposed rearwardly of said backrest and said upright portions, said front and rear ends curving upwardly from the intermediate portions of said rocker portions, respectively, the upper extremities of said curved rear ends smoothly joining in curved portions the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, said element further including a horizontally extending cross- ;bar which is integrally connected at its opposite ends to the upper' extremities of said curved front ends, said cross-bar extending in a lateral direction between said sides and engaging the underside of said seat adjacent to the front edge of the latter, means including a retaining member secured to the underside of said seat for engaging said cross-bar and limiting rearward movement of the latter relative to said seat, the intermediate portions of said rocker portions having rocker-shaped curvatures and being spaced below said seat and sides to serve as supporting rockers, said cross-bar being disengageable from said retaining member and said supporting-wire element being swingable rearwardly to a second position at which said upright portions are engageable with the upper portion of said backrest and said rocker portions extend rearwardly of said backrest to serve either as hooks for a car seat or as legs for a backwardly tilted chair, said element being preformed to retain yieldably said end portions of said upright portions in supporting engagement with said eyelets.

3. A convertible chair comprising opposite spaced apart sides and backrest means therefor, a seat, means supporting said seat between said sides, a supporting element of relatively stiff elongated material pivotally connected to said backrest; said element including two laterally spaced upright portions disposed adjacent to the rear of said backrest means, means pivotally connecting the upper ends of said upright portions to said backrest means whereby said upright portions may be swung about a horizontal axis when said backrest means is upright, said element further including two laterally spaced rocker shaped portions which join to the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, said rocker portions each including an intermediate portion having front and rear ends, respectively, which turn upwardly into reflex bends, the bights of the front ends being disposed forwardly of said seat, the bights of the rear ends being disposed rearwardly of said backrest, the upper extremities of said rear ends joining the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, a horizontally extending cross-bar secured at its opposite ends, respectively, to the upper extremities of said front ends, said seat being-operatively engageable in supporting relation with said cross-bar, said intermediate portions being disposed beneath said seat in the position of rockers, said element being swingable about the aforesaid pivotal connection with said backrest means to a second position at which said upright portions extend upwardly from said pivotal connection and said rocker portions extend rearwardly to thereby serve as hooks for a car seat.

4. The convertible chair of claim 3 wherein means are provided for securing said seat, sides and backrest means in fixed relation, and means for releasably securing said cross-bar to said seat.

5. A convertible chair comprising backrest means having a seat thereon, a supporting element of relatively stiff elongated material pivotally connected to said backrest; said element including two laterally spaced upright portions disposed adjacent to the rear of said backrest means, means pivotally connecting the upper ends of said upright portions to said backrest whereby said upright portions may be swung about a horizontal axis when said backrest means is upright, said element further including two laterally spaced rocker shaped portions which join to the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, said rocker portions each having an intermediate portion having front and rear ends, respectively, the upper extremities of said rear ends joining the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, means for supporting said seat on said front ends, said intermediate portions being disposed beneath said seat in the position of rockers, said element being swingable about the aforesaid pivotal connection with said backrest means to a second position at which said upright portions extend upwardly from said pivotal connection and said rocker portions extend rearwardly to thereby serve as hooks for a car seat.

6. A convertible chair comprising opposite spaced apart sides and backrest means therefor, a seat means supporting said seat between said sides, a supporting element of relatively stiff elongated material; said element including two laterally spaced substantially parallel up right portions disposed adjacent to the rear of said backrest means, said backrest means extending above said sides, means pivotally connecting the upper ends of said upright portions to said backrest means whereby said upright portions may be swung about a horizontal axis, said element further including two elongated horizontally extending laterally spaced and substantially parallel surfac engaging portions which have front and rear ends, respectively, said rear ends joining the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, said front ends turning upwardly and having a horizontally extending crossbar secured thereto, means for releasably supporting sides and seat 011 said cross-bar, said surface-engaging portions being disposed below said sides and seat for supporting the same on a surface, said element being swingable about the aforesaid pivotal connecting means to a second position at which said upright portions extend upwardly from said pivotal connecting means and said surface-engaging portions extend rearwardly of said backrest means to thereby serve as hooks for a car seat.

7. A convertible chair comprising opposite spaced apart sides and backrest means therefor, a seat means supporting said seat between said sides, a pair of supporting elements of relatively stiff elongated material; said elements including two laterally spaced substantially parallel upright portions disposed adjacent to the rear of said backrest means, said elements further including two elongated horizontally extending laterally spaced and substantially parallel surface-engaging portions which have front and rear ends, respectively, said rear ends joining the lower extremities of respective ones of said upright portions, respectively, said front ends turning upwardly adjacent to the front portions of said sides and seat, means for releasably supporting the front of the chair formed by said sides and seat on said upturned front ends, said surface-engaging portions being disposed below said sides and seat for supporting the same on a surface, means pivotally connecting said elements to said backrest means whereby said elements may be swung to a second position at which said upright portions extend upwardly from said pivotal means, said surface-engaging portions extend rearwardly of said backrest means and said front ends turn downwardly to thereby serve as hooks for a car seat.

8. The convertible chair of claim 2 wherein said retaining member includes a rib-like member which depends from the underside of said seat, said rib-like member having a bottom edge which is provided with a notch, said notch removably receiving said crossbar and being frictionally engaged thereby for retaining said crossbar assembled to the underside of said seat.

9. A convertible chair comprising backrest means having a seat thereon, said seat having spaced apart front and rear portions, a rocker element for supporting said backrest means and seat on a supporting surface, said rocker element being curved upwardly when disposed beneath said seat in supporting relation thereto, means pivotally mounting said rocker element on said backrest means for swinging movement about a horizontal axis betweenfirst and second positions when said backrest means is in upright position, said first position disposing said rocker element beneath said seat, said rocker element having front and rear end portions when disposed in said first position, said rocker elements in said first position having its rear portion adjacent to and beneath the rear portion of said seat and its front portion adjacent to and beneath the front portion of said seat, means for supporting the front portion of said seat on the front portion of said rocker element, said second position disposing said rocker element to extend to the rear of said backrest means with the curvature thereof being downward whereby said rocker element serves as a hanger for a car seat.

10. A convertible chair comprising backrest means having a seat thereon, said seat having spaced apart front and rear portions, a rocker element for supporting said backrest means and seat on a supporting surface, said rocker element being curved upwardly when disposed beneath said seat in supporting relation thereto, means pivotally mounting said rocker element on said backrest means for swinging movement about a horizontal axis between first and second'positions when said backrest means is in upright position, said first position disposing said rocker element beneath said seat, said rocker element having front and rear end portions when disposed in said first position, said rocker elements in said first position having its rear portion adjacent to and beneath the rear portion of said seat and its front portion adjacent to and beneath the front portion of said seat, support means on the front portion of said rocker element and extending upwardly therefrom when said rocker element is in said first position for supporting the front portion of said set, said support means extending downwardly from said rocker element when the latter is in said second position and combining with the latter to form a hook-shaped hanger.

11. A convertible chair comprising backrest means having a seat thereon, said seat having spaced apart front and rear portions, a rocker element for supporting said backrest means and seat on a supporting surface, said rocker element being curved upwardly when disposed beneath said seat in supporting relation thereto, means pivotally mounting said rocker element on said backrest means for swinging movement about a horizontal axis between first and second positions when said backrest means is in upright position, said first position disposing said rocker element beneath said seat, said rocker element having front and rear end portions when disposed in said first position, said rocker elements in said first position having its rear portion adjacent to and beneath the rear portion of said seat and its front portion adjacent to and beneath the front portion of said seat, the front portion of said rocker element being elongated and extending upwardly into supporting engagement with the front portion of said seat when said rocker element is in said position, said elongated front portion of said rocker element and said rocker element forming a hook-shaped hanger which is downwardly curved when said rocker element is its second position.

12. A convertible chair comprising opposite spaced apart sides and backrest means therefor, a seat, means supporting said seat between said sides, said backrest means having upper and lower ends and opposite side edges, a pair of supporting elements of relatively stiff elongated material pivotally connected to said backrest means, said elements including two laterally spaced substantially parallel upright portions disposed adjacent to the rear of and inside the side edges of said backrest means, said backrest means extending above said sides, means pivotally connecting the upper ends of said upright portions to said backrest means in between the upper and lower ends thereof whereby said upright portions may be swung about a horizontal axis, said elements further including two laterally spaced rocker shaped portions which join to the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, said rocker portions each having an intermediate portion having front and rear ends, respectively, which turn upwardly into reflex bends, the front ends being disposed forwardly of said seat, the rear ends being disposed rearwardly of said backrest, the upper extremities of said rear ends joining the lower extremities of said upright portions, respectively, means for securing said seat, sides and backrest means in fixed relation, means for releasably securing said front ends to said seat, said intermediate portions being disposed beneath said seat in the position of rockers, said elements being swingable about the aforesaid pivotal connecting means to a second position at connecting means and said rocker portions extend rearwardly to thereby serve as books for a car seat.

1 I which said uprights extend upwardly from said pivotal References Cited in the file of this patent 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 220,258 Stevens Oct. 7, 1879 1,154,403 Jones Sept. 21, 1915 2,293,560 Price Aug. 18, 1942 10 2,399,792 Copp May 7, 1946 10 Zdanaitis et al. July 27, 1948 OConnor June 14, 1949 Bennett Sept. 6, 1949 Prigg Jan. 17, 1950 Thompson Jan. 31, 1961 Kostenborder et al May 16, 1961 Chreist et a1. Apr. 2, 1963 Laughlin Aug. 27, 1963 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Feb. 2, 1925 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No.. 3, 15 5 425 v v R November S 1964 Louis R. Chr-eist, It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 8 line 21, for "set" read seat line 43,

' after "said" second occurrence, insert first same column 8, line 46 after "is" insert in --o Signed and 'sealed this 20th day of April 1965 (SEAL) Attest ERNEST w. SWIDER K EDWARD J; BRENNER gAjtcsting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3222104 *Oct 30, 1964Dec 7, 1965Remington R JacksonChild's convertible car and table seat
US3285655 *Dec 14, 1964Nov 15, 1966Smith & Stone LtdBaby car seat
US3288525 *May 17, 1965Nov 29, 1966Cerf Donald BOrthopedic chair
US3318615 *Aug 4, 1965May 9, 1967South Bend Toy Mfg Company IncSide mounted accessory for toy vehicle
US3659898 *Dec 9, 1970May 2, 1972Bernard YellinChair
US4754999 *Oct 10, 1986Jul 5, 1988Spalding & Evenflo Companies, Inc.Child's car seat/booster seat
US5322343 *Sep 8, 1992Jun 21, 1994Gerry Baby Products CompanyInfant car seat
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/131, 297/254
International ClassificationA47D1/10, A47D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47D1/103, A47D1/08
European ClassificationA47D1/10B, A47D1/08
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Mar 29, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: MILTON BRADLEY COMPANY, 1500 MAIN ST., SPRINGFIELD
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:SOUTH BEND TOY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, INC.;REEL/FRAME:003960/0866
Effective date: 19820311