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Publication numberUS3155975 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 3, 1964
Filing dateMay 7, 1962
Priority dateMay 7, 1962
Publication numberUS 3155975 A, US 3155975A, US-A-3155975, US3155975 A, US3155975A
InventorsChatelain Maurice G
Original AssigneeRyan Aeronautical Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circular polarization antenna composed of an elongated microstrip with a plurality of space staggered radiating elements
US 3155975 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

United States Patent 3,155,975 CIRQULAR POLARIZATION ANTENNA COM- PGSED OF AN ELONGATED MICROSTRIP WITH A PLURALITY 0F SPACE STAGGERED RADIATING ELEMENTS Maurice G. Chatelain, San Diego, Calif., assignor to The Ryan Aeronautical Co., San Diego, Calif. Filed May 7, 1962, Ser. No. 192,846 Claims. (Cl. 343-785) The present invention relates generally to antennas and more particularly to a circular polarization microstrip antenna.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a microstrip antenna sensitive to circularly polarized radiation and which can easily be arranged to circular polarization in either direction or in one specific direction.

Another object of this invention is to provide a microstrip antenna which is very compact and is constructed as an integral unit with no parts to become detached or misaligned.

Finally, it is an object to provide a circular polarization microstrip antenna of the aforementioned character which is simple to manufacture in various sizes and for various frequency ranges.

With these and other objects definitely in view, this invention consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of elements and portions, as will be hereinafter fully described in the specification, particularly pointed out in the claims, and illustrated in the drawing which forms a material part of this disclosure, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of an antenna sensitive to circular polarization in either direction;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken on line 22, of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view of an antenna sensitive to circular polarization in one direction; and

FIGURE 4 is a side elevation view of the antenna of FIGURE 3.

Referring now to FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawing, the antenna is basically a microstrip transmission line, comprising an elongated conductive microstrip 1d and an elongated conductive ground plane 12. The microstrip is embedded, substantially centrally, in a block 14 of dielectric material and the ground plane 12 is bonded to the underside of said block. The dielectric block 14 is thus the primary structural member of the antenna and serves to hold the microstrip 10 and ground plane 12 in the proper spaced and parallel relation. Mounted on the top and sides of dielectric block 14 are a plurality of radiating elements, the upper elements 16 being longitudinall spaced and extending transversely across the block parallel to the plane of microstrip 1G. Along both sides of block 14, the side elements 18 are perpendicular to the plane of microstrip it) and longitudinally spaced between the upper elements 15, the lower ends of said side elements being connected to ground plane 12. The radiating elements 16 and 18 may be bonded to or embedded in the dielectric material and the Width and spacing thereof is dependent on the required radiation pattern and frequency range.

With all of the radiating elements 16 and 13 perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the microstrip It}, the antenna is sensitive to radiation having circular polarization in either direction and also to linear polarization. The incident radiation excites those of the radiating elements 16 and 13 which are substantially aligned with the electric vector and they, in turn, excite the microstrip iii. Electrical connections 20 and 22 are, of course, taken 3,155,975 Patented Nov. 3, 1964 from microstrip 1i) and ground plane 12, as in FIGURE 1. Regardless of the polarization of the incident radiation, the total amount of excitation and the resultant energy fed into the microstrip are substantially constant. Thus orientation of the antenna to a transmitter is not critical.

If the antenna is required to be sensitive to one particular circular polarization only, the configuration illustrated in FIGURES 3 and 4 may be used. In this antenna the basic structure is similar to that described above, with a microstrip 30 and ground plane 32 incorporated into a dielectric block 34. However, the upper radiating elements 36 and side radiating elements 38 are inclined to the longitudinal axis of microstrip 19. As illustrated the radiating elements 36 and 38 are at an angle of about 60 degrees to the microstrip axis and collectively form a rectangular helix with a screw sense for excitation by circularly polarized radiation with right hand or clockwise rotation. The angle of inclination of the radiating elements may vary and the inclination can be reversed to receive left hand or counter-clockwise polarization.

The radiation pattern of the antenna is endfire and can be controlled by variation in the size and spacing of the radiating elements and by the type of dielectric used, the directivity being a factor of antenna length in Wavelengths and the number of radiating elements per unit wavelength. Phase velocity also varies with size and spacing of the radiating elements. For proper Coupling the microstrip and radiator array should have the same phase velocity.

The antenna is particularly applicable, but not limited to space vehicles and satellites whose orientation may be problematic. Since signal strengths may be low over the long distances involved in space communications, antenna efficiency is critical and the non-directional characteristics of the antenna herein described are advzmhgeous.

It is understood that minor variation from the form of the invention disclosed herein may be made Without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, and that the specification and drawing are to be considered as merely illustrative rather than limiting.

I claim:

1. An antenna, comprising:

an elongated, conductive microstrip;

an elongated, conductive ground plane spaced from and parallel to one face of said microstrip;

and a plurality of radiating elements spaced from and longitudinally spaced along the other face and both sides of said microstrip in staggered relation.

2. An antenna, comprising:

an elongated dielectric block;

an elongated, conductive microstrip embedded in said dielectric block;

an elongated conductive ground plane on said dielectric block spaced from and parallel to one face of said microstrip;

and a plurality of radiating elements on said dielectric block spaced from and spaced longitudinally along the other face and both sides of said microstri in staggered relation.

3. An antenna, comprising:

an elongated dielectric block an elongated, conductive microstrip embedded in said dielectric block;

an elongated conductive ground plane on said dielectric block spaced from and parallel to one face of said microstrip;

and a plurality of radiating elements on said dielectric block spaced from and spaced longitudinally along the other face and both sides of said microstrip;

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS McClellan 343-9l2 Kreinheder 343 785 Cooper 333-95 Butler 34377l Thourel 343-785 Carr 343-785 10 HERMAN KARL SAALBACH, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
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US2929065 *Feb 27, 1957Mar 15, 1960Hughes Aircraft CoSurface wave antenna
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3509571 *Jun 16, 1967Apr 28, 1970Us ArmyRadome antenna
US3541567 *Sep 25, 1967Nov 17, 1970Clara A FrancisMultielement radio-frequency antenna structure having linearly arranged elements
US4054874 *Jun 11, 1975Oct 18, 1977Hughes Aircraft CompanyMicrostrip-dipole antenna elements and arrays thereof
US4165454 *Nov 8, 1976Aug 21, 1979U.S. Philips CorporationMicrowave oven
US4203117 *Sep 28, 1978May 13, 1980The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyDual beam line scanner for phased array applications
US4378558 *Aug 1, 1980Mar 29, 1983The Boeing CompanyEndfire antenna arrays excited by proximity coupling to single wire transmission line
US4382261 *May 5, 1980May 3, 1983The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyPhase shifter and line scanner for phased array applications
US4494120 *Apr 29, 1983Jan 15, 1985Motorola, Inc.Two element low profile antenna
US4507664 *Jun 16, 1982Mar 26, 1985The Secretary Of State For Defence In Her Britannic Majesty's Government Of The United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Northern IrelandDielectric image waveguide antenna array
US4618865 *Sep 27, 1984Oct 21, 1986Sperry CorporationDielectric trough waveguide antenna
US4743916 *Dec 24, 1985May 10, 1988The Boeing CompanyMethod and apparatus for proportional RF radiation from surface wave transmission line
US5541616 *Mar 6, 1995Jul 30, 1996Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Surface-mountable antenna
US5581262 *Feb 6, 1995Dec 3, 1996Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Surface-mount-type antenna and mounting structure thereof
US5712648 *May 30, 1996Jan 27, 1998Murata Manufacturing Co., Ltd.Dielectric filter and antenna duplexer
US20140118203 *Nov 1, 2012May 1, 2014John R. SanfordCoax coupled slot antenna
EP0484241A1 *Oct 30, 1991May 6, 1992France TelecomPrinted circuit antenna for a dual polarized antenna array
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/785, 343/911.00R, 333/246, 343/873, 343/844
International ClassificationH01Q21/24
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q21/24
European ClassificationH01Q21/24