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Publication numberUS3156000 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 10, 1964
Filing dateOct 29, 1962
Priority dateOct 29, 1962
Publication numberUS 3156000 A, US 3156000A, US-A-3156000, US3156000 A, US3156000A
InventorsWesthoff Earl C
Original AssigneeWesthoff Earl C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ball cleaner attachment for golf cart
US 3156000 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 10, 1964 E. c. WESTHOFF 3,155,000

BALL CLEANER ATTACHMENT FOR cow cARi' Filed Oct. 29, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR. WEST/10F;

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MW @MZ/ A7 TOR/YE Y5 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 E. C. WESTHOFF BALL CLEANER ATTACHMENT FOR GOLF CART I L J MV////// L v .3 A rv v J W P O 40 9 m h m w 3 z 5 7 H64 4 Nov. 10, 1964 Fild Oct. 29, 1962 uu mummy I unmnu unmun United States Patent Ofiice 3,1563% Patented Nov. 10, 1964 3,156,000 BALL CLEANER ATTACHMENT FUR GQLF CART Earl C. Westhoif, 532 N. Scott Ave, Box 365, Belton, Mo. Filed Oct. 29, 1962, Ser. No. 233,673 4 Claims. (Cl. 15-513) This invention relates generally to golf ball cleaning devices, and more particularly to devices of this character for attaching to a sloping golf cart handle.

Golf ball cleaning devices are commonly placed in strategic locations on golf courses, however, during winter months or with muddy fairways such devices are often inadequate in number and location or not properly serviced so as to be available or function when needed. Also, such devices usually cannot selectively clean a spot on a golf ball but tend to abrade the ball even where clean, dulling the finish.

The principal objects of the present invention are: to provide a golf ball cleaning device whichis constantly available to the golfer; to provide such a device for attaching to the handle of a golf cart which is adapted to efficiently clean golf balls and selectively clean spots thereon if desired; to provide such apparatus which includes a lid; to provide such a device having a molded integral body for ease of production while imparting high strength and light weight thereto; to provide such a device having semi-cylindrical chambers lined with a deep pile of water-retentive material for receiving golf balls therein for celaning, drying or storing; to provide such an apparatus which when secured to a normally sloping golf cart handle presents ball cleaning chambers and a lid in a horizontal position for convenience, however, will not spill liquid from the cleaning chambers if tilted; and to provide such a device which is simple in construction and well suited for its intended purpose.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein are set forth by way of illustration and example certain embodirnents of this invention.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the golf ball cleaning device shown assembled with a portion of a sloping golf cart handle.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the device with the lid raised and shown partially in section.

FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view through the device taken on the line 3-3, FIG. 5, particularly showing the golf cart handle clamps depending from an intermediate bottom wall.

FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional View through the device taken on the line 4-4, FIG. 5, particularly showing a ball cleaning chamber with a deep pile water-retentive material therein.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view through the device taken on the line 55, FIG. 3, particularly showing the semi-cylindrical form of the ball cleaning chambers.

Referring to the drawings in more detail:

The reference numeral 1 generally indicates an integral rigid body molded of a suitable lightweight rugged material such as die-cast aluminum or a plastic resin and having a forward portion 2 and a rear portion 3. The body 1 includes a pair of curved walls 4 and 5 forming a pair of laterally spaced parallel horizontally extending elongated upwardly open substantially cylindrical chambers 6 and 7 respectively. Lower depending bulging portions 8 and 9 respectively extend longitudinally of the chambers 6 and 7 and form reservoirs 10 and 11 respectively opening upwardly into the chambers 6 and 7.

Spaced chamber front end walls 12 and 13 and spaced chamber rear end walls 14 and 15 extend across the respective chambers 6 and 7 forming enclosures therefor. The chamber rear end walls 14 and 15 depend below the chambers 6 and 7 as best illustrated in FIGS. 4 and 5. Spaced parallel inner side walls 16 and 17 depend respectively from and between the curved walls 4 and 5 and extend longitudinally of and rearwardly past the chambers 6 and 7 at 18 and 19. A downwardly and rearwardly sloping central bottom wall 20 extends between said inner side walls 16 and 17 forming therewith an increasing depth upwardly open channel 21 bers 6 and 7. The channel 21 has a forward end 22 extending both between and rearwardly of the chambers 6 and 7. The channel 21 has a forward end 22 located rearwardly of the chamber front end walls 12 and 13 and a rear end 23 located rearwardly of the chamber rear end walls 14 and 15.

The inner side wall 16 has a jog at 24 toward the inner side wall 18 adjacent the chamber rear end wall 14 for a purpose later described. A channel forward end wall 25 extends across the channel 21 and closes the channel forward end 22. A body rear end wall 26 has an upper edge portion 27 and is spaced rearwardly of the chamber rear end walls 14 and 15 and extends across and closes the channel rear end 23. A horizontal wall 28 extends between the chambers 6 and 7 adjacent the chamber front end walls 12 and 13.

A pair of outer parallel depending side walls 29 and 29' join and extend rearwardly of the chamber rear end walls 14 and 15 and join the body rear end wall 26 at 1 positions 30 and 31 spaced laterally outwardly of the channel rear end 23. A pair of outer bottom walls 32 and 33 of different elevation join the outer side walls 29 and 29 and chamber rear end walls 14 and 15 and the body rear end wall 26 forming therewith a pair of upwardly open receptacles designated 34 and 35 of different depth respectively located directly rearwardly of the chambers 6 and 7, the chamber 34 being of greater depth for reasons discussed hereinafter.

A pair of clamping members 36 and 37 have downwardly open notches 38 and 39 respectively for receiving a golf cart handle 40 thereinto. 36 and 37 are. spaced longitudinally of the channel 21 and depend substantially equal lengths from the central bottom wall 26. The clamping members 36 and 37 have clamping bars 41 and 42 respectively associated there with and removably secured thereto with suitable screws 43 threadedly engaged in the members 36 and 37 for covering the respective notches 38 and 39 to easily and quickly clamp the body 1 on the golf cart handle 40.- It is noted that the golf cart handle 40 slopes diagonally upwardly as best shown in FIG. 3 when the golf cart (not shown) is placed in an upright position to present golf clubs (not shown) for selection. "Due to-the dif-z ference in elevation of the clamping members 36 and 37, however, when the golf cart'handle 40 is in this sloping position the chambers 6 and 7 are maintained sub- T he clamping members Ct stantially horizontal or level for ease in cleaning golf balls as described more fully hereinafter.

A normally horizontally extending planar rigid lid 44, which may be of the same or other suitable material as the body 1, has a front edge 45 and a rear edge 46. The lid 44 is hingedly secured by suitable hinges 47 adjacent the rear edge 46 to the body rear end wall 26 at the upper edge portion 27 thereof. The lid 44 is adapted to selectively cover and hinge upwardly to provide access to the chambers 6 and 7, the receptacles 34 and 35 and the channel 21. The lid 44 has a forwardly extending finger grasping portion 43 for ease in hinging same upwardly with respect to the body 1 and a suitable latch 49 is secured adjacent the grasping portion 48 and adapted to engage into an opening 50 extending through the hori zontal wall 28 for selectively latching the lid 44 closed when desired.

The lid 44 has a clip 51 pivotally secured thereto at 52 and urged by springs 53 into a resilient closure against the lid 44 at 54. The clip 51 extends laterally of the lid 44 near the lid rear edge 46 and resiliently clamps the upper edge of a golf score card 55 for retaining the golf card in writing position on the lid 44. It is to be understood that the clip 51 will release the score card 55 by pressing downwardly adjacent the rear edge thereof causing an opening between the clip and lid at 54.

The clip 51 has a groove 56 extending therealong transversely of the lid 44 which is adapted to receive a short pencil 57 thereinto for maintaining same in a convenient position for grasping and marking the score card 55. A retaining member 58 is secured to the clip 51 and extends over the groove 56 for resiliently retaining the pencil 57 in the groove and prevent accidental loss during normal movement of the golf cart (not shown). The clip 51 has suitable upwardly extending Y-shaped members 59 and 60 thereon for temporarily retaining a burning cigarette 61 or cigar 62 during a golf shot. It is noted that the member 60 is larger than the member 59 for extra convenience in holding the greater diameter cigar.

Referring particularly to FIGS. 2, 4 and 5, an interior lining 63 of deep pile capillary wicking water-retentive material such as a fleece-like synthetic shearling such as sold under the trademark Dynel is suitably secured to the curved walls 4 and and chamber end walls 12, 13, 14 and for covering the interior of the chambers 6 and 7. The exposed surface 64 of the water-retentive lining 63 presents an internal diametrical dimension within the chambers 6 and 7 which is substantially smaller than the outside diameter of golf balls 65 which may be inserted into the respective chambers. The retentive lining 63 is resiliently deformed by golf balls 65 and thus rubs on the surface thereof when the ball is longitudinally reciprocated in the respective chambers.

In use, water and detergent or other suitable liquid cleaner 66 may be introduced into at least one of the chambers, in the illustrated example, chamber 7, which liquid cleaner settles through the retentive lining 63 and is at least partially stored within the reservoir 11. The motion of the body 1 during movement with the golf cart between golf shots agitates the liquid cleaner 66 so that it is constantly moved into contact with the under surface of the lining 63 from which it is wicked up from the reservoir into the retentive lining, presenting a brush or sponge-like cleaning surface which is wetted for efiicient cleaning. The retentive lining prevents the liquid from running or splashing out of the chambers unless a liquid quantity greatly in excess of that required for efficient cleaning is introduced thereinto. A golf ball 65 may then be rotated and reciprocated longitudinally within the chamber 7 and the rubbing or friction of the lining 63 will cause the surface of the golf ball to be cleaned. If only spot cleaning is desired, the ball need not be rotated but only reciprocated with the spot exposed to the lining. In the preferred use of the device, the golf ball is then transferred to the other chamber 6 which is dry in that it does not have liquid cleaner therein and the ball is similarly reciprocated and rotated which will cause the surface of the ball to be dried for proper golf use. It is further noted that if desired one or more golf balls may be stored within the dry chamber for use during the game, for example, when an extra fine ball is needed for putting. It is to be understood that both chambers may be loaded with liquid cleaner if desired and the ball then dried on a towel or the like. Thus, a convenient golf ball cleaner is provided which eliminates dependence on stationary golf ball washers which may be inoperative or not properly located for use when needed.

The receptacle 34, due to the jog 24, is larger in width and as noted above greater in depth than the receptacle 35 to permit the insertion thereinto of a standard or king sized pack of cigarettes (not shown) for retention in a convenient place during the golf game. If desired, tees (not shown) may be retained inthe receptacle 35 which is relatively shallow to aid in grasping those on the bottom. It is noted that suitable openings 67 extend through the bottom walls 32 and 33 of the receptacles 34 and 35 for draining liquids therefrom which may accidentally be dropped therein. Additional convenient storage space is provided by the channel 21 for such personal items as change, car keys, wrist watches, cigarette lighters and other items (not shown) which the average golfer does not want to carry on his person during a golf match. The score card 55 may be stored beneath the closed lid 44 in case of inclement weather.

It is to be understood that while one form of this invention has been illustrated and described, it is not to be limited to the specific form or arrangement of parts herein described and shown except insofar as such limitations are included in the claims.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A golf ball cleaning device for attaching to a golf cart handle comprising:

(a) a body having an elongated rigid wall substantially semi-cylindrical in shape, the ends of which are closed to form a chamber,

(b) a clamping member with a golf cart handle receiving portion therein, said clamping member being fixed with respect to said body and having means associated therewith for clamping said body on the golf cart handle, means forming a reservoir opening into said chamber, and

(c) an interior lining of capillary deep pile liquid cleaner-retentive material on said wall in said chamher and dividing said chamber from said reservoir, said pile presenting an interior surface with a diametrical dimension smaller than the outside diameter of a golf ball,

(d) whereby a liquid cleaner may be introduced into said reservoir and wicked up in said absorbent material and a golf ball may be rotated and reciprocated longitudinally within said chamber for cleaning same.

2. The device as set forth in claim 1 including:

(a) a planar rigid lid having a front edge and a rear edge, said lid being hingedly secured adjacent said lid rear edge to said body and adapted to selectively cover and provide access to said chamber.

3. The device of claim 1 including:

(a) a planar rigid lid hingedly secured to said body and adapted to selectively cover and provide access to said chamber, and

(b) latch means on said lid and adapted to engage said body for selectively maintaining said lid in closed position.

4. A golf ball cleaning device for attaching to a golf cart handle comprising:

(a) a body having an elongated rigid wall substantially semi-cylindrical in shape, the ends of which are closed to form a chamber,

(b) a clamping member with a golf cart handle receiving portion therein, said clamping member being fixed With respect to said body and having means associated therewith for clamping said body on the golf cart handle,

(c) an interior lining of deep pile liquid cleanerretentive material on said Wall in said chamber, said pile presenting an interior surface with a diametrical dimension smaller than the outside diameter of a golf ball, and

(d) a lower depending bulging portion on said Wall and extending longitudinally of said chamber, said bulging portion forming a reservoir opening upwardly into said chamber for receiving a liquid cleaner.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS Lawler.

Evans.

Sample.

Duff.

Hershey 224-292 Alcamo 15-21 Lord.

Kimes et a1.

CHARLES A. WILLMUTH, Primary Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1639740 *Aug 8, 1925Aug 23, 1927Edward Lawler JamesBall cleaner
US1710816 *Jun 1, 1928Apr 30, 1929Herbert EvansGolf-ball cleaner
US1842291 *Jan 24, 1931Jan 19, 1932Sample Warren MGolf ball washer
US2608705 *Aug 3, 1946Sep 2, 1952Duff John RGolf ball cleaner
US2782971 *Nov 15, 1954Feb 26, 1957Stephen HersheyCaddy bag cart kit
US2952859 *Mar 19, 1958Sep 20, 1960John H AlcamoSurgeons' pre-operating scrubbing machine
US3062422 *Jan 19, 1959Nov 6, 1962Lester W LordGolf accessory kit
US3119533 *Aug 5, 1960Jan 28, 1964Kimes Gerald CBall storing accessory for golf carts or the like
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3872534 *Nov 15, 1973Mar 25, 1975Wittek Golf Range Supply Co InGolf club head washing apparatus
US4104758 *Apr 4, 1977Aug 8, 1978Stotler James LCredit card washing device
US4746045 *Feb 17, 1987May 24, 1988Schweim Donald EGolf scorecard holder
US4784305 *Sep 30, 1987Nov 15, 1988Kenneth SchoenbergGolf accessory
US5040763 *Aug 14, 1989Aug 20, 1991Wilson Donald RGolf cart umbrella holder
US5074448 *Feb 27, 1991Dec 24, 1991Wu Ching ChangGolf cart score board and handlebar angular position adjusting structure
US5234114 *Apr 24, 1992Aug 10, 1993Daniel CoffeyGolfing equipment carrier
US5419478 *May 10, 1994May 30, 1995Mauro; EdSteering column-mounted cooler
US5435474 *Mar 23, 1994Jul 25, 1995Lin; Yung-HsingScoreboard for golf carts
US5676400 *Sep 9, 1996Oct 14, 1997Super-Tec ManufacturingMarking board for attachment to golf trolley
US5983432 *Jun 5, 1998Nov 16, 1999Jones; NathanMultigolf cleaner
US8381954 *Mar 15, 2011Feb 26, 2013Unique Product & Design Co., Ltd.Scoreboard structure for golf carts
US20110036881 *Aug 13, 2009Feb 17, 2011Mustang Motion LLCGolf cart storage accessory
US20120234880 *Mar 15, 2011Sep 20, 2012Gordon LiaoScoreboard Structure For Golf Carts
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/104.92, 15/118, 224/274, 15/210.1
International ClassificationA63B47/04, A63B47/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B47/04
European ClassificationA63B47/04