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Publication numberUS3157440 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 17, 1964
Filing dateJan 22, 1962
Priority dateJan 25, 1961
Publication numberUS 3157440 A, US 3157440A, US-A-3157440, US3157440 A, US3157440A
InventorsIchisaburo Kaino, Kenji Hijiya, Yasuhiro Nakano
Original AssigneeNihon Spindle Mfg Co Ltd, Nitto Boseki Co Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fibrous raw material feeding arrangements for spinning machines
US 3157440 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 17, 1964 Filed Jan. 22, 1962 ETAL FIBROUS RAW MATERIAL FEEDING ARRANGEMENTS KENJI HIJIYA 3,157,440

FOR SPINNING MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS EH61 mxvm \YASUNRO mmauo xuushevao mm Nov. 17, 1964 KEN'JI, Hl-JIYA ET'AL FIBROUS. RAW MATERIAL FEEDlNGi ARRANGEMENTS FOR SPINNING MACHINES Filed Jan. 22', 1962:

4 Sheet s-Sheex 2 INVENTORS enn H\3'\YA,YASuH|no NAMNO -r ICH SRBURQ KAHNO ATTORNEYS 1964 KENJl HIJIYA ETAL 3,157,440

FIBROUS RAW MATERIAL FEEDING ARRANGEMENTS FDR SPINNING MACHINES Filed Jan. 22, 1962 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR8 KENJ'I mrvrA YASUHIRO mumlculsnadao xmuo Elam) Nov. 17, 1964 KENJl HIJIYA ETAL 3,157,440

FIBROUS RAW MATERIAL FEEDING ARRANGEMENTS Filed Jan. 22, 1962 FOR SPINNING MACHINES 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTORJ smmww FIGS. 1, 2 and 3, a receiving means D is shown.

United States Patent 3,157,440 FIBROUS RAW MATERIAL FEEDING ARRANGE- MENTS FOR SPINNING MACHINES Kenji Hijiya, Arnagasaki, Hyogo Prefecture, Yasuhiro Nakano, Tammi-kn, Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, and Ichisahuro Kaine, Nayagawa, Osaka, Japan, assignors to Nihon Spindle Mfg. Co., Ltd., Amagasaki, Japan, and Nitto Boselri Co., Ltd., Fukushima, Japan Filed Jan. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 167,851 Claims priority, application Japan, Jan. 25, 1961, 36/2,394 7 Claims. (Cl. 302-28) This invention relates to improvements in arrangements of conveying and feeding fibrous raw materials such as cotton-wool in a spinning machine.

One object of this invention is to provide arrangements for conveying and alloting fibrous raw material delivered to a plurality of receiving means automatically by means of air stream.

Another object of this invention is to provide arrangements of the class described which are capable of alloting the fibrous raw material evenly to all receiving means and in which the fibrous raw material flows freely.

Another object of this invention is to provide arrangements of the class described in which the fibrous raw material circulates through passages while being conveyed by air, and during its passage the material is allotted into receiving means.

Briefly stated in accordance with one aspect of this invention, there is provided an arrangement of a spinping machine, comprising a main duct through which fibrous raw material is conveyed by means of air stream, and a plurality of branch ducts branched out of the main duct, through which the conveyed material is allotted into a plurality of receiving means, each of said branching points being provided with a resisting block.

The invention will be better understood and other objects and additional advantages of the invention will become apparent upon perusal of the following description taken in connection with the drawings.

In the drawings, FIG. 1 is a schematic elevation of a spinning machine embodying this invention, showing a conveying system for a fibrous raw material;

FIG. 2 is a sectional elevation of a receiving means;

FIG. 3 is a front elevation thereof;

FIG. 4 is a partly sectional elevation of a disjointing means;

FIG. 5 is a plan view thereof;

FIG. 6 is an enlarged vertically sectional view thereof taken along lines AA of FIG. 5;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged horizontally sectional view thereof taken along lines B'B' of FIG. 6; and

FIG. 8 is an enlarged vertically sectional view thereof taken along lines C'C of FIG. 7.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the preferred embodiment of this invention will now be described; however, this description will be understood to be illustrative of the invention and not as limiting it to the particular construction shown and described. In Main duct C leads from mixing and scutching means A to hoppers 2. Cotton is admitted into the duct C and is conveyed through the duct by means of an air stream supplied by blower 1, cotton being distributed to the hoppers in the following manner. The main duct C is communicated with the hopper 2 through an inlet 3. The bottom of the main duct C has a down slope 4 to the inlet 3 so as to enlarge the section of the main duct C thereto gradually. There is an expanded portion 5 of the top of the main duct C arranged above the hopper 2 so as to prevent the main duct C from cotton clogging Patented Nov. 17, 1964 about the inlet 3. A subsidiary passage 6 is provided to communicate the main duct C with the hopper 2. Its upper end is tilted so as to form a subsidiary air stream. Between the inlet 3 and the subsidiary passage 6 a hollow resisting block 7 having a front wall 7' and a rear wall 7" is positioned. A filter netting 8 made of metallic material, glass fibre, vinyl resin thread, etc. -is positioned across the lower part of the subsidiary passage 6 in order to prevent the cotton allotted to the hopper 2 from the main duct C from counterflowing thereto. A compressed air nozzle 9 is provided within the upper part of the subsidiary passage 6 and arranged downwardly so as to blow off cotton clogged on the filter netting 8 and to ensure the subsidiary air stream through the subsidia-ry passage 6 by means of an intermittent air stream ejected by the compressed air nozzle 9 which is communicated with a compressed air source such as a compressor through a compressed air pipe 10 and a branch thereof 10. It is preferred that the upper half of the hopper 2 is individually constructed from the main duct C so as to be removable from the latter disengaging the flange 11 with the latter. The lower half 2' of the hopper 2 is telescopically constructed so as to be adjustable in height. By virtue of such a construction, arranging the main duct along the ceiling of the mill and a carding frame on the floor of the mill, it becomes possible to adjust the distance between the main duct C and taking up 'a pair of wood rollers 12 arranged under the bottom of the hopper 2. The above construction facilitates the flow of the air stream from the main duct C into the hopper 2 so as to supply cotton to the latter, excess air being returned to the main duct C through the subsidiary passage 6 so as to join the main stream, whereby it becomes possible to convey and allot cotton to the hoppers 2 smoothly and surely.

In FIGS. 4 through 8, a separator B is illustrated. Raw cotton-wool delivered from the mixing and scutching means A in a sliver form by lap rollers 41 is directed to this separator B. Numeral 42 indicates a feeding means having a width corresponding to the raw cotton 52 being delivered at the inlet end. Feeding means 42 is directioned towards main duct C in the form of a funnel shape, as is shown in FIG. 5. Blow-off means 43 for directing air against the delivered cotton 52 is supplied with air by means of blow-oil 45 and blast pipe 44. Blow-off means 43 comprises a slit 53 provided in the wall of the feeding means 42 and several nozzles 51. The latter is so devised that, for example, it is displaced continuously in a direction at a right angle to that of the transfer of the cotton 52, whereby the transferring cotton 52 is torn to pieces having a predetermined size. Numeral 1 indicates a main blower whence air is directed to the main duct C through which the torn cotton 52 is conveyed by the air. Numeral 48 indicates a motor to drive the blower 45. In the blow-01f means 43, there is an endless belt 49 carrying the nozzles 51 which are displaced along the slit 53 of the feeding means 42 continuously. Belt 49 is driven and held by pulleys 50 and 50'. The slit 53 may be provided in and across the lower wall of the feeding means 42 or in and across the both walls thereof, is covered by the blow-oif means 43 and is further kept air-tight by the endless belt 49 so as to jet air effectively only through the nozzles 51. A suitable casing 54 covers the blow-oil? means 43 and a part of the feeding means 42. The raw cotton 52 is thus torn to predetermined even pieces by the moving jet air generated by the nozzles 51 moving in a direction at a right angle to the travel of the cotton, conveyed to the outlet of the feeding means 42, and further conveyed through the main duct C by the air delivered by the main blower 1, or a conveyor. Therefore, movement in the 3 main duct C becomes smooth and even and-equally sized pieces of cotton are conveyed for feeding to every hopper. The blast generated by the blower 45 directed against the cotton by means of preferably inclined nozzles 51 serves to assist the conveyance in the main duct C. The slits 53 may readily be provided'in the' optional wall of the feeding means. The casing 54' may be' made simply, Therefore, such a construction is very inexpensive. CT is a return duct, while G isa reverse tank.

"What we claim is:

. 1. A fibrousrmaterial feeding meanscomprising a duct, through which said fibrous material is conveyed by means of an air stream, and a resisting block positioned at a branching point of said duct to receiving means so as to direct a portion of said material tosaid receiving means, said resisting block having a continuous front Wall on the side .of air-fiber impingement and being positioned at' an intermediate cross-section of said duct so as to deflect airwhiledefining upper and lower'channels for fluid flow about said resisting block and defining a subsidiary passagercommu nicating said duct with said receiving means subsidiary passage and a nozzlefor jetting compressed air against said filter within said subsidiary passage.

. 4. A'fibrous materiai feeding means as claimed in claim 1, which comprises a separator in which raw fibrous material delivered in a sliver-like form is torn successively into a'plurality of pieces of predetermined size by means of jets of compressed air, and then fed into said duct for conveyance. V a

I 5. A fibrous material feeding means as claimed in claim 1, which comprises a separator in which raw fibrous material delivered in sliver-like form is torn successively into a plurality of pieces of predetermined size by means of jets of compressed air, discharged by continuously displaced nozzles'rnoving across the path of fibrous material flow, said fibrous material then being fed into ,said' duct for conveyance 6. ,A fibrous material feeding means comprising a duct branching point of said duct to a receiving means so as to direct a portion of said material to said receiving means, said resisting block having a continuous front wall on the side of air-fiber impingement and being fixedly positioned at an intermediate cross section of said duct so as to' deflect air while defining an annular channel for fluid flow about said block.

7. A fibrous material feeding means which comprises a separator in which raw fibrous material is delivered in sliver-like form, a plurality of continuously displaced nozzles moving across the path. of fibrous material flow in said separator, means for forcing jets of air through said continuously displaced nozzles so as to successively tear said rawfibrous material into a plurality of pieces of predetermined size and means for passing saidtorn fibrous material into a duct for conveyance.

References Cited'in the file of this patent.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Vessels a June 23, 1964

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3284140 *Dec 18, 1964Nov 8, 1966Neu EtsSeparating-distributing device for textile fibers
US3316024 *Aug 6, 1965Apr 25, 1967Nippon Spindle Mfg Co LtdMethod of pneumatic conveyance and distribution of fiber material and apparatus therefor
US3348886 *Mar 4, 1966Oct 24, 1967Hergeth Kg Masch ApparateFeeding devices for fiber treating machines
US3408115 *Mar 30, 1966Oct 29, 1968Neu EtsApparatus and method for distributing textile fibers
US3414330 *Nov 16, 1966Dec 3, 1968Truetzschler & CoPneumatic feeding arrangement for supplying fibrous materials
US3435484 *Jan 18, 1966Apr 1, 1969Curlator CorpFiber distributing system
US3450439 *Apr 19, 1967Jun 17, 1969Tmm Research LtdChutes for feeding textile materials to cards
US3453355 *Mar 18, 1966Jul 1, 1969Rudloff BernardProcess for pneumatically tearing and parting fiber flocks
US3473848 *Apr 20, 1967Oct 21, 1969Tmm Research LtdTextile cards
US3712682 *Nov 10, 1969Jan 23, 1973Rieter Ag MaschfApparatus for feeding fiber material into a chute
US3930285 *Oct 24, 1973Jan 6, 1976Alfred Proctor Aldrich, Jr.Apparatus and method for forming staple fibers and feeding the same to a picker
US4696608 *Oct 28, 1985Sep 29, 1987Maschinenfabrik Rieter A.G.Transport duct for fiber flocks
US6428246Jun 22, 2000Aug 6, 2002Sealed Air CorporationSystem and method of conveying, storing, and dispensing packing material
US7234206 *Feb 13, 2004Jun 26, 2007Marzoli S.P.A.Connector for connecting a fibre feeding duct to at least one textile machine
CN100467684CMar 18, 2004Mar 11, 2009马尔佐利股份公司Connector for connecting a fibre feeding duct to at least one textile machine
EP1462549A1 *Mar 27, 2003Sep 29, 2004MARZOLI S.p.A.Connector for connecting a fibre feeding duct to at least one textile machine
Classifications
U.S. Classification406/93, 406/172, 406/156, 19/65.00R, 241/39
International ClassificationD01G23/08, D01G23/02, D01G23/00
Cooperative ClassificationD01G23/08, D01G23/02
European ClassificationD01G23/08, D01G23/02