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Publication numberUS3158145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1964
Filing dateMar 6, 1962
Priority dateMar 6, 1962
Publication numberUS 3158145 A, US 3158145A, US-A-3158145, US3158145 A, US3158145A
InventorsRaymond L Handy
Original AssigneeRaymond L Handy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bow arrow holder
US 3158145 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1964 R. L. HANDY 3,158,145

BOW ARROW HOLDER Filed March 6, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet l Fig.

Fig. 2

Raymond L. Handy Nov. 24, 1964 R. L. HANDY 3, 3,

BOW ARROW HOLDER Filed March 6, 1962 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fig. 6

Raymond L. Handy INVENTOR United States Patent 3,158,145 130W ARRQW HOLDER Raymond L. Handy, W aldron, Ark. (Rte. 4, Box 40-6, Henderson, Tex.) Filed Mar. 6, 1962, Ser. No. 177,861 13 Claims. (Cl. 12441) This invention relates to a novel and useful arrow holder which has been designed to provide a means to maintain an arrow engaged with a partially drawn string of a bow whereby the bow and arrow will be ready for instantaneous use and may be therefore more quickly brought into shooting position.

The arrow holder of the instant invention is adapted to be supported from a bow at a point immediately below the window formed in the grip portion thereof and is movable between retracted and operational positions. The arrow holder is constructed in a manner whereby it will automatically move from the operational position to the retracted position by means of gravity upon its release from the arrow being held. In this manner, an archer may assume his shooting position with one hand grasping the bow and the other hand grasping the bowstring without inter erence from the arrow holder.

The arrow holder is constructed in such a manner to utilize the normal forward thrust effected by a partially drtwn bowstring on an arrow for urging the clamping jaw portions of the arrow holder into tighter frictional engagement with the arrow being held. In addition, the arrow holder is provided with resilient release means designed to urge the holder to its inoperative position upon further movement of the bowstring toward a fully drawn position from a partially drawn position. This enables the arrow holder to be automatically disengaged from the arrow gripped thereby and subsequent movement of the arrow holder to the retracted out-of-the-way position.

The main object of this invention is to provide an arrow holder for a bow enabling an arrow to be engaged with a partially drawn bowstring and held in position ready for instant movement to the shooting position and movement of the bowstring to a ully drawn position.

A further object of this invention is to provide an arrow holder in accordance with the preceding objects which will readily adapt itself to various types of bows.

A still further object of this invention is to provide an arrow holder which will, by means of frictional engagement with the forward end of an arrow and the frictional engagement of the rear end of the arrow with a partially drawn bowstring, enable an arrow to be supported from two points spaced longitudinally therealong in proper position relative to a bow in order that the partially drawn bow and its arrow may be readily carried by a hunter with only one hand engaged with the grip portion of the bow and without necessitating any portion of the partially drawn arrow to be held by the hunter.

A final object to be specifically enumerated herein is to provide an arrow holder in accordance with the preceding objects which will conform to conventional forms of manufacture, be of simple construction and easy to use so as to provide a device that will be economically feasible, long lasting and relatively trouble free in operation.

These together with other objects and advantages which will become subsequently apparent reside in the details of construction and operation as more fully hereinafter described and claimed, reference being had to the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of the bow arrow holder;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a bow shown with the arrow holder of the instant invention 3,158,145 Patented Nov. 24, 1964 secured to the grip portion thereof and being utilized to retain an arrow engaged with the string of the bow in a partially drawn position;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary front elevational View of the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 2 but with the arrow and bowstring removed and the arrow holder in an inoperative but unretracted position;

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view of the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 3;

FIGURE S is a top plan view of the embodiment illustrated in FIGURE 2 with the arrow shown in phantom lines and on somewhat of an enlarged scale; and

FlGUR-E 6 is a fragmentary side elevational View similar to that of FIGURE 2 but on somewhat of an enlarged scale and with the arrow holder in a retracted position.

Referring now more specifically to the drawings the numeral 10 generally designates an arrow which is provided with a pointed forward end 12 and a notched rear end 14 having a plurality of feathers 16 and 18 secured thereto. In FIGURE 2 of the drawings it may be seen that the notched rear end of the arrow 1% is engaged with a bowstring 2t? which is secured at its opposite ends (not shown) to the opposite ends of the bow generally referred to by the reference numeral 22.

The how 22 includes a grip portion 24 which has a sight window 25 formed therein defining a ledge or shelf 26 that extends transversely of the bow 212.

The arrow holder of the instant invention is generally designated by the reference numeral 28 and includes a mount 3d which is pivotally secured to a base portion generally referred to by the reference numeral 32. The base portion 32 is generally L-shaped in configuration and includes an upper horizontal leg 34 and a depending lower vertical leg 36. The upper horizontal leg 34 is twisted and has its free end portion pivotally secured to one end of the elongated mount 30 by means of a pivot pin 38.

The arrow holder includes a lazy-tong assembly generally referred to by the reference numeral 48 and it may be seen from FIGURE 1 of the drawings that the lazy-tong assembly includes a first pair of links 42 and 44 and a second pair of links 46 and 48. Corresponding ends of the links 42 and 44 are pivotally secured to the free end of the elongated mount 38 by means of pivot pin 50 for rotation about an axis extending at substantially right angles to the medial plane of the lazy-tong assembly. Corresponding end portions of the links 46 and 48 are pivotally secured to the free ends of the links 42 and 44 respectively by means of pivot pins 52 and 54 respectively and the mid portions of the links 46 and 48 are crossed and are pivotally secured together by means of a pivot pin 56; The free ends of the links 46 and 48 are provided with confronting generally semi-cylindrical jaw members 58 and 69 respectively and it will be noted that the confronting faces of the jaw members 53 and 60 have resilient nonslip gripping elements 62 and 64 secured thereto in any convenient manner.

From FIGURES 1 and 3 of the drawings it may be seen that the jaw members 58 and 60 are laterally offset to one side of the medial plane of the lazy-tong assembly 40 and that when the jaw members 58 and 60 are brought into the closely adjacent operative positions as illustrated in FIGURE 5 of the drawings they generally parallel each other.

A leaf spring 66 has its opposite ends secured in apertures 63 and 76 formed in the links 42 and 44 respectively and normally resiliently urges the lazy-tong assembly 40 toward the inoperative positions illustrated in FIGURES 1, 3 and 4 of the drawings.

From FIGURES 2, 3 and 6 of the drawings it may be seen that the vertical leg 36 is provided with a plurality of apertures 72 through which fasteners 74 may be secured to mount the base portion 32 on the forward portion of the bow 2 2. The base portion 3 2 is mounted on the grip portion 24 immediately beneath the sight window 25 formed therein and it may be seen from a comparison f FIGURES 2 and 6 of the drawings that the lazy-tong assembly 40 of the arrow holder 28 may be pivoted from the extended position illustrated in FIGURE 2 of the drawings to the retracted position illustrated in FlGURE 6 of the drawings by means of gravity.

In operation, the arrow 1d has its notched rear end engaged with the bowstring 25 Then, the bowstring is partially drawn and the lazy-tong assembly 43 is pivoted upwardly at its free end to position the jaw members 58 and 60 on opposite sides of the arrow lll. Then, the lazytong assembly 44 may be squeezed by applying pressure to move the pivot pins 52 and 54 toward each whereupon the jaw members 58 and 60 will be brought into engagement with opposite sides of the arrow as illustrated in FIGURES 2 and of the drawings. Then, the tension of the bowstring 29 may be transferred to the arrow holder 25 by allowing the arrow 1%) to move slightly forwardly enabling the frictional engagement of the jaw members 53 and all with the arrow it to urge the jaw members 58 and 60 into further and tighter frictional engagement with the arrow 1d. As soon as the tension of the bowstring 243 and the forward thrust on the arrow effected thereby has been transferred to the arrow holder 28, the partially drawn bow 22 may be carried merely by gripping any portion thereof with one hand.

The bow 22 will be normally carried by the hand of the hunter which normallysupports the bow and the hunters hand will be disposed about the grip portion 24 of the bow 22.. If it is desired, the bow 22 may then be raised into the shooting position and the hunter may engage his other hand with the bowstring 20. A slight rearward pull on the bowstring 29 will effect rearward movement of the arrow iii thereby lessening the frictional engagement of the jaw members 58 and as withthe arrow 10. As soon as frictional engagement of the jaw members 58- and 60 with the arrow It has been reduced sufficiently, the leaf spring 66 will urge the lazy-tong assembly 4-3 to its inoperative position and as soon as the jaw members 58 and 69 have been moved apart a distance greater than the diameter of the arrow, the free end of the lazy-tong assembly 46 will pivot downwardly to the retracted position illustrated in FIGURE. 6 Thereafter, the hunter may fully draw the bow string 26 and release the same in order to shoot the arrow 10.

Accordingly, it may be seen that herein described is an arrow holder which may be utilized to maintain an arrow in a partially drawn state and yet which will automatically move to a retracted inoperative position upon movement of the bowstring of a bow with which the arrow holder is assocated to a more fully drawn position.

The foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention as claimed.

What is claimed as new is as follows:

1. A bow arrow holder comprising a lazy-tong assembly having a horizontally disposed medial plane and including at least two pair of pivotally connected links, a mount, one corresponding pair of ends of one pair of said links being pivotally secured to said mount for swinging moveinent through planes paralleling said medial plane, a first pair of ends of the other pair of links being pivotally secured to the other pair of ends of said one pair of links for rotation about upstanding axes, said other pair of links being crossed and pivotally secured together intermediate their opposite ends for relative rotation about an upstanding axis, the free second pair of ends of sai Ofllfif p 4 of links having means thereon laterally offset to one side of the medial plane of said assembly adapted to frictionally grip an arrow shaft therebetween, and means adapted to secure said mount on a bow.

2. The combination of claim 1 wherein said gripping means on said free second pair of ends comprises confronting generally semi-cylindrical jaws.

3. The combination of claim 2 wherein the inner faces of said jaws have resilient non-slip gripping surfaces.

4. The combination of claim 1 wherein said securing means includes a base portion adapted for direct secure ment to a bow, said mount being pivotally secured to said base portion for rotation about an axis disposed at substantially right angles to said axes and generally paralleling said medial plane.

5. The combination of claim 4 wherein said gripping means on said free ends comprises confronting generally semi-circular jaws.

6. The combination of claim 5 including means normally urging said lazy-tong assembly to a retracted position.

7. The combination of claim 4 including means normally urging said lazy-tong assembly to a retracted position.

8. The combination of claim 1 including means normally urging said lazy-tong assembly to a retracted posi tion.

9. The combination of claim 8 wherein said gripping means on said free ends comprises confronting generally semicircular jaws.

10. The combination of claim 9 wherein the inner faces of said jaws have resilient non-slip gripping surfaces.

11. The combination of claim 10 wherein said securing means includes a base portion adapted for direct securement to a bow, said mount being pivotally secured to said base portion for rotation about an axis disposed at substantially right angles to said axes and generally paralleling said medial plane.

12. A bow arrow holder comprising a pair of jaw members having coacting confronting faces adapted to grip an arrow shaft 'therebetween, said holder including means adapted to support said holder from a bow and means mounting said jaw members for relative movement toward and away from each other, said mounting means including means adapted to urge said jaw members toward each other in response to axial displacement of an arrow shaft in one direction relative to said holder when said arrow is between and trictionally engaged with said jaw members and means normally urging said jaw members away from each other.

13. A bow arrow holder comprising a lazy-tong assembly having a horizontally disposed medial plane and including at least two pair of pivotally connected links, a mount, one corresponding pair of ends of one pair of said links being pivotally secured to said mount for swinging movement through planes paralleling said medial plane, a first pair of ends of the other pair of links being pivotally secured to the other pair of ends of said one pair of links for rotation about upstanding axes, said other pair of links being crossed and pivotally secured together intermediate their opposite ends for relative rotation about an upstanding axis, the free second pair of ends of said other pair of links having confronting elongated generally semi-cylindrical jaws thereon laterally offset to one side of and generally paralleling the medial plane of said lazy-tong as- LOUIS R. PRINCE, Primary Examiner. JAMES W. LOVE, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US656492 *May 21, 1900Aug 21, 1900William Fischer SrHolder for asparagus, &c.
US2483928 *Aug 18, 1947Oct 4, 1949George J OttArrow clamp for archery bows
US2622917 *Oct 30, 1947Dec 23, 1952Evans Pierce SamuelUtility tongs
US2705658 *Sep 10, 1952Apr 5, 1955Eastern Brass & Copper Co IncTongs and gripping jaws therefor
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4407261 *Dec 24, 1981Oct 4, 1983Elliott Kenneth LArrow lock
US4632087 *Sep 17, 1984Dec 30, 1986Cline Darrell WArchery arrow support device
US4722318 *Oct 29, 1986Feb 2, 1988Yankey Robert LCrossbow bolt stabilizer
US4949699 *Feb 28, 1989Aug 21, 1990Product Innovation Corp.Arrow guide
US5143414 *Sep 24, 1990Sep 1, 1992Rosellini Davey GMedical device for holding hypodermic syringe needle caps
US6196210 *Apr 12, 2000Mar 6, 2001Roger M. ChamberlainBow with arrow stabilizing pin and porous arrow
US7856968May 2, 2007Dec 28, 2010New Archery Products Corp.Move-away arrow rest
Classifications
U.S. Classification124/44.5, 294/118, 81/348, 294/119, 294/110.1
International ClassificationF41B5/22
Cooperative ClassificationF41B5/143
European ClassificationF41B5/14D8