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Publication numberUS3158282 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1964
Filing dateJan 8, 1962
Priority dateJan 10, 1961
Publication numberUS 3158282 A, US 3158282A, US-A-3158282, US3158282 A, US3158282A
InventorsIngen Housz Jan Floris
Original AssigneeInland Steel Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shipping container
US 3158282 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 24, 1964 J. F. l. HOUSZ SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed Jan. 8, 1962 INVENTOR. JAN wms INGEN H0052 Z 4 MM vw 0W ATTYS.

United States Patent Ofiflce 3,158,282 Patented Nov. '24, 1964 SHIPPING CONTAINER Jan Floris Inger: Housz, Heemstede, Netherlands, as-

signor, by mesne assignments, to Inland Steel Company, Chicago, 111., a corporation of Delaware Filed Jan. 8, 1962, Ser. No. 164,824 Claims priority, application Great Britain Jan. 10, 1961 6 Claims. (Cl. 220-63) The present invention relates generally to shipping containers and, more particularly, to an improved closure assembly suitable for use with a container of the type having a rigid outer shell or overpack and a flexible, nonmetallic inner shell or liner, the liner having one or more inlet or outlet necks projecting outwardly through corresponding openings formed in the outer shell.

It is a general aim of the present invention to provide an improved closure construction for shipping containers having non-metallic liners. A related object of the invention is to provide a novel closure assembly for shipping containers characterized by its ability to effect a positive, liquid-tight seal, yet wherein the container may be readily opened and subsequently reclosed for storage of any unused contents.

More specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a shipping container closure construction employing both a reusable, kxible, snap-on seal cap and a destructible, single-use rigid seal cap.

It is another object of the invention to provide a shipping container and a closure assembly therefor which permits of economic fabrication from readily available materials.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention are attained by the construction and arrangement shown by way of illustration in the accompanying drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary front elevational view of a sealed shipping container with the left portion of the container. and its closure assembly shown in section prior to turning the rigid seal cap inwardly; and,

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. 1 of a slightly modified closure assembly also embodying the features of the present invention.

While the invention has been illustrated and will be described with particularity in connection with preferred embodiments thereof, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to these specific embodiments. On the contrary, it is intended to cover such equivalent and alternative constructions as may be included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

Referring first to FIG. 1, there is illustrated a portion of a shipping container embodying the features of the present invention and having a generally rigid outer shell or overpack 11 within which is located a flexible inner shell or liner 12. As the ensuing description proceeds, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that while the present invention is not directed to particular materials for the manufacture of shipping containers, it is, nevertheless, advantageously applicable to containers in which the outer shell or overpack 11 is made of a rigid material such, for example, as sheet steel or other sheet metals, fiber board, plywood, or other natural or synthetic materials, while the liner 12 is made of a more flexible thermoplastic material such, for example, as polyethylene.

In order to provide for filling and emptying such containers, the liner 12 includes a neck 13 projecting through an opening in the outershell 11 (or a lid therefor), the extremity of the neck being provided with an outwardly and downwardly depending skirt 14 having a diameter greater than that of the neck 13. A rigid annular collar 15 having a head or curl 16 at its upper extremity, is mounted in surrounding relation to the neck 13 with the curl 16 being snugly received within the annulus defined by the depending skirt 14 of the liner neck 13. In the exemplary form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, the collar 15 is integral with the outer shell 11. It will be appreciated that the foregoing arrangement insures that the flexible liner 12 is fixedly axially relative to the rigid outer shell 11.

In forming shipping containers of the type described above, the liner 12 may be blow moldedthat is, the thermoplastic material is blown into the outer shell 11 from a parison. Inasmuch as the liner neck 13 is of a thickness substantially the same as the liner 12 (that is, no screw threads are provided), the neck 13 may either be blown directly from a thin parison or it may be blown out from the material forming the liner proper. The

, latter system permits the location of the neck to be chosen with more freedom than otherwise possible since the neck need not be seated on the nip-off line. The depending skirt portion 14 may be molded to the neck of the liner right at the blowing operation. Alternatively, the skirt may be formed by folding back a portion of the neck.

An additional advantage attendant the formation of such containers resides in the fact that, since no screw threads are formed in the liner material, the liner 12 proper and the neck 13 are not subjected to shrinking stresses resulting from non-uniform wall thicknesses. Consequently, dimensional control of the thermoplastic material is facilitated and the problem of stress cracking (particularly in the root area of the neck) is decreased. Moreover, the rate of production is enhanced since the extended cooling period required for setting of relatively thick threaded necks is unnecessary.

Inaccordance with one of the important aspects of the present invention, there is provided a novel closure assembly which not only insures a positive liquid-tight seal for thecontainer, but which also serves as a reusable closure in the event it is desired to store a portion or all of the contents of the container after the latter has been opened. In the exemplary form of the invention shown in FIG. 1, this is accomplished by utilizing a flexible snap-on cap 17 in conjunction with a destructible thin metal seal cap 18. The flexible cap 17 may be made of a similar material as the liner 12, for example, polyethylene. Thus, the. natural resiliency of the material permits the lip of the cap to be pushed or snapped over the curl 16 when closing or opening the container.

To provide a liquid-tight seal, the destructible rigid seal cap 18 (which, for example, may be made of sheet metal) has formed thereon an annular skirt 19 which is dimensioned such that the lower portion thereof may be turned inwardly by means of a crimp-on sealing tool or a wheel-on tool (such a wheel-on tool being shown diagrammatically at 20 in FIG. 1). The tool 20 serves to turn the lower portion of the skirt 19 inwardly into intimate contact with that portion of the flexible snap-on cap 17 which'encompasses the depending liner skirt 14 and container curl 16. Thus, the thin layers of flexible liner neck 13 and snap-on cap 17 material are tightly crimped between the rigid sealcap 18 and the rigid curl 16 over a substantial portion of the latters cross-sectional pe rliphery, thereby insuring a liquid-tight and tamperproof Sec To facilitate opening of the container, provision may be made for destroying the rigid seal cap 18. Merely by way of example, the cap 18 shown in FIG. 1 has formed therein a peripheral score or tear line 21. A tab or ear 22 is securely mounted on the skirt 19. To open the container it is merely necessary to grasp the ear 22 and tear the cap 18 01f along the tear line 21. Of course, those skilled in the art will appreciate that it is not necessary to provide a score or tear line since the seal cap may be destroyed in other ways without damaging the snap-on 3 closure cap 17. After removal of the rigid seal cap 18, the snap-on cap 17 may be readily removed although it remains intact. Consequently, partially emptied containers may be reclosed by again applying the snap-on cap to the container neck. Such a closure will generally suflice for storage purposes.

If the shipping container is to be reused, a new rigid seal cap 18 which is relatively inexpensive, particularly in comparison to the entire container, may be applied.

Turning to FIG. 2, there is shown a slightly modified form of closure construction also embodying the features of the present invention. In this embodiment the flexible snap-on cap 17 has formed therein a recessed top within which is positioned a rigid, cup-shaped support 23. The cup-shaped support provides additional backing and support for the curl 1d during the crimp-on" or wheel-on operation. Additionally, it enhances the quality of the seal by increasing the effective sealing area between the flexible snap-on cap 17 and the liner neck 13.

It will be appreciated that there has been described a novel and effective closure construction for use with shipping containers of the type embodying liners made of thermoplastic material or the like, yet wherein the need for screw threaded closures is eliminated. Moreover, the snap-on cap may be used repetitively in the event the container is not completely emptied.

I claim as my invention:

l. A shipping container comprising,.in combination, a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surrounding said opening, said collar having a circumferentially disposed bead formed thereon, a resilient non-metallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing said bead, a resilient flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said bead so as to form a single continuous seal between the two resilient surfaces provided by the lip of said flexible cap and the skirt portion of said liner encompassing said bead, and a thin metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt of said seal cap.

2. A shipping container comprising, in combination, a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surrounding said opening, said collar having a circumferentially disposed bead formed thereon, a resilient non-metallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing said bead, a resilient flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said bead so as to form a single continuous seal between the two resilient surfaces provided by the lip of said flexible cap and the skirt portion of said liner encompassing said bead,

a thin'metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt of said seal cap, and means on said thin metal seal capfor destroying said cap while leaving: said flexible cap intact.

3. A shipping container comprisingin combination, a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surroundingsaid opening, said collar having a circumferentially disposed bead formed thereon, a non-metallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing said bead, a flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said bead, the top central portion of said cap having a recess formed therein, a rigid cup-shaped support mounted in said recess, and a thin metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt of said seal cap.

4. A shipping container comprising, in combination, a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surrounding said opening, said collar having a circumferentially disposed bead formed thereon, a non-metallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing said bead, a flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said head, the top central portion of said cap having a recess formed therein, a rigid cup-shaped support mounted in said recess, a thin metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt ofsaid seal cap, and means on said thin metal seal cap for destroying said cap while leaving said flexible cap intact.

5. A shipping container comprising, in combination, a

a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surrounding said opening, a resilient nonmetallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing the upper end of said collar, a resilient flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said downwardly extending skirt portion of said liner so as to form a single continuous seal between the two resilient surfaces provided by the lip of said flexible cap and the skirt portion of said liner encompassing said bead, and a thin metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt of said seal cap.

6. A shipping container comprising, in combination, a rigid hollow shell, said shell having an opening formed therein, means associated with said shell defining a rigid annular collar surrounding said opening, a resilient nonmetallic liner received within said shell, said liner having a neck projecting outwardly through said opening and through said collar, said neck terminating in an outwardly and downwardly extending skirt portion encompassing the upper end of said collar, a resilient flexible non-metallic cap having a circumferentially disposed downwardly and inwardly projecting lip, said lip being snapped over said downwardly extending skirt portion of said liner so as to form a single continuous seal between the two resilient surfaces provided by the lip of said flexible cap and the skirt portion of said liner encompassng said bead, the top central portion of said cap having a recess formed therein, a rigid cup-shaped support mounted in said recess, and a thin metal seal cap, said seal cap having an annular skirt encompassing said lip and being deformed inwardly beneath said lip so that said lip and the skirt portion of said liner neck are crimped between said collar and the skirt of said seal cap.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 6 Graham June 14, 1932 Scudder "Dec. 22, 1936 Shenk Jan. 31, 1939 Marzo June 15, 1943 Pfeifer Sept. 15, 1953 Florman Mar. 15, 1955 Tupper Oct. 16, 1956 Ernst Oct. 23, 1956 Wagner July 22, 1958 Keller Sept. 8, 1959 Scanlon June 6, 1961

Patent Citations
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US1447082 *Jan 20, 1922Feb 27, 1923Henrik IpsenBottle closure
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US1862620 *Dec 19, 1928Jun 14, 1932Graham Ralph ABottle cap
US2065293 *Sep 18, 1935Dec 22, 1936Tracy ScudderLined drum
US2145613 *Jan 18, 1937Jan 31, 1939Continental Rubber WorksRubber lined barrel
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US2652148 *Dec 9, 1949Sep 15, 1953Edwal Lab IncCombination package
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US2767711 *Feb 25, 1954Oct 23, 1956Ernst OttoEye medicament package
US2844277 *Sep 4, 1956Jul 22, 1958Sherwin Williams CoSingle ring element container closure
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3425471 *Dec 1, 1966Feb 4, 1969Bennett Ind IncPlastic container with double lid
US4087019 *Feb 13, 1976May 2, 1978Atsugi Kinzoku Kogyo Co., Ltd.Plug arrangement for a container
US4151929 *Aug 16, 1977May 1, 1979Sapien Sisto VPlastic liner with collar for a paint receptacle
US4520942 *Apr 20, 1984Jun 4, 1985American Flange & Manufacturing Co. Inc.Container closure having a frangible outer cap
US4585143 *Jan 25, 1984Apr 29, 1986Boise Cascade CorporationLiquid container
US4625892 *Apr 18, 1985Dec 2, 1986Poly Processing Company, Inc.Polyolefin tank within a metallic tank
US4625980 *Jul 1, 1985Dec 2, 1986Chrysler MotorsFuel tank
US5174464 *Jan 14, 1992Dec 29, 1992All-Pak, Inc.Paint or similar can with overcap
US5261551 *Jun 30, 1992Nov 16, 1993All-Pak, Inc.Paint or similar can with overcap having a central opening
US5450975 *Nov 9, 1994Sep 19, 1995Total Containment, Inc.Secondarily contained underground liquid storage vessel and method of construction
EP2592015A1 *Nov 9, 2011May 15, 2013Carlsberg Breweries A/SBeverage bottle with a re-sealable closure having a cap and a collar
WO2013068454A1 *Nov 8, 2012May 16, 2013Carlsberg Breweries A/SBeverage bottle with a re-sealable closure having a cap and a collar
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/62.21, 220/257.1, 29/511, 220/270
International ClassificationB65D51/18, B65D41/32, B65D41/42
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2251/0015, B65D2251/0078, B65D2251/0046, B65D41/42, B65D51/18
European ClassificationB65D51/18, B65D41/42