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Publication numberUS3158865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 24, 1964
Filing dateMar 28, 1961
Priority dateMar 28, 1961
Publication numberUS 3158865 A, US 3158865A, US-A-3158865, US3158865 A, US3158865A
InventorsMax Mccorkle
Original AssigneeThompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Submarine mounted telescoping antenna
US 3158865 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

mza ww Nov. 24, 1964 M. MCCORKLE SUBMARINE MOUNTED TELESCOPING ANTENNA Filed March 28, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 a A;TORNEYS Nov. 24, 1964 M. MCCORKLE 3,158,865

SUBMARINE MOUNTED TELESCOPING ANTENNA Filed March 28, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Nov. 24, 1964 M. MCCORKLE SUBMARINE MOUNTED TELESCOPING ANTENNA 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 28, 1961 United States Patent 3,158,865 SUBMARINE MOUNTED TELESCOPING ANTENNA Max McCorkle, Kirtland, Ohio, assignor to Thompson Ramo Wooldridge Inc., Cleveland, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Mar. 28, 1961, Ser. No. 98,913 4 Claims. (Cl. 343-709) This invention relates antenna structures and, more particularly, to a multiple whip retractable antenna for submergible vessels such as submarines.

Antennas for sea going vessels, particularly submarines, must be designed to meet numerous requirements not ordinarily encountered with normal installations. For example, a low frequency antenna mounted on a submarine should be designed to retract into the submarine hull for protection during a dive and be extended to a considerable height for operation when the submarine has surfaced. When the submarine is on the surface and the antenna is extended, it must be able to withstand high winds and rough seas, and, during a maximum depth dive, it must be able to withstand the high pressures encountered and have practically no air or oil leakage, which would raise the chances of detection.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to pro vide a novel retractable antenna for submergible vessels such as submarines which meets these requirements.

It is another object of this invention to provide an antenna structure for a submarine and a method of installing it which can be retracted into the submarine hull for safe storage and protection during a depth dive and, when extended on the surface, will operate in high winds and rough seas.

It is still another object of this invention to provide a retractable antenna structure having a series of telescoping members which are coupled together by bellows seals.

Other objects, features and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying figures of the drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic illustration of a retractable antenna structure constructed in accordance with the invention; and

FIGURES 2-5 are detailed illustrations of sections of the retractable antenna structure illustrated in FIGURE 1.

As shown on the drawings:

With reference to FIGURE 1, there is illustrated an antenna structure 10 that is mounted in the hull 11 of a vessel such as a submarine. The structure 10 includes a storage area 12 that is constructed in the hull 11 and coupled to two telescoping casings segments 13 and 14. Disposed within the inner segment 14 is a sliding car riage 15 for a plurality of antenna probes 16. This carriage 15 is slidably mounted within the casing segment 14, the segment 14 is slidably mounted within the seg ment 13, and the segment 13 is slidably mounted within the storage area 12.

When the segments are to be retracted from the extended position shown in FIGURE 1, a storage pulley 17 is rotated about a shaft 18 which causes a retracting cable 19, fastened to the carriage 15, to windup and pull the segments 13 and 14 and the carriage into the storage area 12. On the other hand, when the antenna structure 10 is in the retracted position and is to be extended for use, a source of fluid, preferably air, under pressure, is coupled to the interior of the structure through a conduit 20 and the force of this fluid causes the segments 13 and 14 and the carriage 15 to slide outwardly.

An electric cable 21 travels down the center of the segments and connects the antenna probes 16 to a suitable electric circuit such as a transmitter or tuner.

The interiors of the area 12 and the segments 13 and 14 are cylindrical and the couplings between the sliding members of the structure are made watertight by a series of cylindrical bellows seals 22, 23 and 24. The outermost seal 22 prevents water from entering the interior of the structure between the storage area 12 and the segment 13, the intermediate seal 23 prevents water from entering the interior between the segments 13 and 14, and the innermost seal 24 prevents water from entering between the segment 14 and the carriage 15.

FIGURES 2-5 are detailed illustrations of this structure, FIGURE 2 showing the details of the left end section that includes the pulley 17, FIGURE 3 showing the details of the section that includes the coupling between the storage area 12 and the segment 13, FIGURE 4 showing the details of the section that includes the coupling between the two segments 13 and 14, and FIGURE 5 showing the details of the section that includes the antenna probes 16 and the carriage 15.

The apparatus illustrated in FIGURE 2 is mounted within the interior of the hull 11 behind the storage area 12 and includes a container 25 that is fixed to the storage area 12 by suitable means such as bolts or welding. Mounted within this container 25 is a motor and transmission box 26 which is coupled to drive the cable storage pulley 17 and the retracting cable 19. This is preferably an electric motor which is coupled to a suitable source of electric power by a coupling 27 and a power line 27a which are mounted on the container. The retracting cable 19 is looped around an idler pulley 28, which is mounted on a bracket 29, and rests on a guide 30 which keep the cable 19 on a straight line down the center of the segments 13 and 14.

The container 25 is made air tight by seals 31 between this container and the hull 11 and by seals 32 between the container 24 and an access cover 33, which is fastened to a flange 34 on the container 24 by a plurality of bolts. The source of fluid under pressure is fastened to a coupling 35 and a conduit 36, the coupling 35 being mounted in one wall of the container 25. When the antenna probes 16 are to be extended to their outermost points, the fluid source is turned on and it fills the container 24, the storage area 12, and the casing segments 13 and 14, and forces these elements and the carriage 15 outwardly. Later when the antenna is to be retracted the pressure is withdrawn and electric power is applied to the electric motor drive. The retracting cable 19 then winds up around the cable storage pulley 17 and causes the carriage 15 and antenna probes 16 to be drawn into the interior of the casing segment 14 and the two segments 13 and 14 to be drawn into the antenna storage area 12.

The cable 21 which connects to the antenna probes 16 is preferably a coaxial cable which follows a spiral path around the retracting cable 19. The rearward of this cable is held in place by a clip 37 that is fastened to the guide 30 stand, and it is electrically coupled to a tuner 38 by means of an electrical coupling 39.

A structural ring 39 is fastened to the casing for the storage area by a plurality of bolts 40. Another bolt 41 extends through the stand for the guide 30, a spacer 42, the structural ring 39, and a bellows mountnig ring 43, thereby mechanically coupling the guide 30 stand and the ring 43 to the structural ring 39 and the vessel hull. The bracket 29 for the idler pulley 28 is also mounted on this structural ring.

A cylindrical bellows seal 22 is fastened to the bellows mounting ring 43 by suitable means such as welding, and two annular seals 45 and 46 are seated in grooves formed in the structural ring 39. These seals prevent water from passing from the space on the outside of the bellows seal ice 3 44 into the container 25, with the result that the interior of the vessel and the container are made watertight.

FIGURE 3 is a detailed illustration of the coupling between the casing for the antenna storage area 12 and the casing segment 13. The antenna storage area 12 includes a cylindrical bore 50 that receives the cylindrical casing segment 13. The segment 13 rides on two sleeve bearings 51 and 52, both being fastened to the segment 13. These two bearings may be formed in a continuous ring around the segment 13 or they may be a plurality of arcuate strips that are spaced at substantially equal angular distances around this segment. The bearings can be fastened in place by any suitable means, and the bearing 52 is prevented from moving by a snap ring 55.

A cylindrical bellows support 56 is threaded into the interior surface of the casing segment 13 and is fastened directly to the outer end of the bellows seal 22. The innermost end of the bellows support 56 is fastened to a second bellows mounting ring 57 which supports the intermediate bellows seal 23. The bellows mounting ring 57 is held in place on the bellows support 56 by a portion 59 which fits into a groove formed in the support 56, and a seal 60 makes the connection between the ring 57 and the support 56 watertight.

Although water may enter the bore 50 in the space between the inside of the storage area 12 and the outside of the outermost bellows seal 22, the interior of the antenna structure is still dry because of the bellows seal 22 which is fastened in a watertight manner between the outside of the casing segment 13 and the inside of the antenna storage area 12.

A seal bleed 61 is formed in the casing segment 13 so that air and water can pass into and out of the bore 50 f the storage area as the segment 13 is being extended and retracted. A circular scraper 62 is fastened to the mouth of the bore 50 and bears against the segment 13 and removes debris.

FIGURE 4 gives a detailed presentation of the details of the coupling between the two casing segments 13 and 14. These two segments are hollow cylinders and two circular bearings 65 and 66, which are fastened to the segment 14, provide a bearing surface between them. Once again, a key 67 fastened to the inner casing segment 14 rides in a keyway 68 formed in the segment 13 and guides the relative movement of these two segments. The outer segment 13 also has a scraper 69 fastened to it by a bolt 70, which bears against the inner segment 14 and removes debris when the antenna is being retracted.

A cylindrical bellows support 71 is threaded into the interior of the casing segment 14 and is fastened to the outer end of the intermediate bellows seal 23. The end of the bearing support 71 is fastened by a bolt 72 to another bellows mounting ring 73 which in turn is fastened to the innermost bellows seal 24. A ring seal 75 and a guide member 76 are fastened between the bellows support 71 and the bellows mounting ring 73, the guide member 76 ensuring that the retracting cable 19 and the coaxial cable 21 will remain in approximately the center of the casing segments and not get snagged on any of the moving parts.

Once again it can be seen that in the event water enters the interior of the casing segment 13 it will be prevented from entering the interior of the segment 14 due to the watertight coupling presented by the bellows seal 58. A seal bleed 77 is again formed in the casing segment 14 which permits air and water to flow when the antenna is being extended and retracted.

With reference to FIGURE 5, four equally spaced antenna probes 16 are mounted on the carriage in the casing segment 14. The probes 16 include metallic cylinders 80 which are wrapped in a sheath 81 of an insulating material such as plastic. Each antenna probe is slidably held in a sleeve 82 made of insulating material which is rotatably mounted in a bracket 83. The circular bracket is in two parts and a central screen 84 is held in place between them to keep out debris. A plurality of bolts 85 fasten the bracket 84 to the carriage 15.

The carriage 15 includes a metallic mounting bracket 86 that is pivotally linked to the four metallic antennas 80 by four metallic pins 87. These pins 87 are preferably silver coated to reduce contact resistance. The outside of the mounting bracket 86 is also coated with an insulating material 88, such as plastic, and the couplings between probes 16 and the mounting bracket 86 are covered in each case by a reinforced cylindrical boot 89, also made of an insulating material. Two tension bands 90 and 91 are provided for each boot 89 to hold them in place. The electrical connection to the metallic antennas 80 from the coaxial cable 21 is made through a conventional coaxial connector 92, the mounting bracket 86 and the pins 87. A waterproof insulating material 93 encloses this connector 92.

The metallic mounting bracket 86 is threaded into an annular member 94, made of an insulating material, which in turn is mounted on a sleeve 100 by a plurality of set screws 100a. The sleeve 100 slides along the interior of the casing segment 14 and has a key 101 which rides in a keyway 102 and guides the movement of the carriage.

The retracting cable 19 is coupled to the carriage 15 by a plurality of links 95 that are threaded at one end into a plurality of yokes 96 and at their other ends to a coupling 97. The yokes 96 are fastened to the carriage by pins 98 that extend through the yokes 96 and an annular bellows mounting ring 99. The ring 99 is fastened to the bellows 24 and is threaded into the sleeve 100 that also receives the member 94. Two circular seals 103 and 104 are positioned between the sleeve 100, the ring 99 and the member 94 make the coupling with the sleeve watertight.

In the event water enters the interior of the casing segment 14, it cannot reach the interior of the antenna structure and the electrical connections because of the watertight coupling presented by the bellows seal 74 and the seals 103 and 104. Once again, a seal bleed 105 formed in the sleeve 100 permits air and water to flow into and out of the interior of the casing segment 14 from the outside of the bellows seal 74 as the carriage 15 is being extended and retracted.

The telescoping members may be so constructed that when they are pulled by the cable 19 to their most retracted positions, the telescoping members bear against each other and make the structure better able to with stand the high pressure encountered during dives. For example, the innermost ends of the bellows supports 56 and 71 may bear against the mounting rings 43 and 57. When the carriage 15 is pulled tightly in, the bellows seal 24, in its collapsed position, has sufficient strength .to withstand these pressures. It is apparent that the small openings between the members reduces the water pressure on these bellows seals, and air pressure may be maintained within the structure to support the bellows seals.

The antenna storage area 12 may be constructed in the hull 1 1 so that its mouth is flush with the hull, or it may be projected as shown. While four whip antenna probes are shown mounted on the carriage, it is obvious that a greater or lesser number can be used, or entirely different types may be used. Also, additional telescoping segments can be used.

It is apparent that a novel and useful antenna structure for a submergible vessel has been provided. The antenna structure is easily extended for operation when the vessel is surfaced by injecting -a gas under pressure into the interior of its telescoping casing segments which forces these segments to their extended positions. This action also causes the retracting cable 19 to unwind from the cable storage pulley 17. When the structure is so extended it rises to a considerable height, and, even at this height, it is still sturdy enough to withstand the forces of high winds and rough water. When the vessel is preparing to submerge the motor attached to the pulley storage cable pulley 17 is energized which causes the cable 19 to wind up around the pulley 17 and pull the carriage 15 and the two telescoping casings 13 and 14 into the antenna storage area 12. The bellows seals coupling these telescoping members together makes the apparatus watertight. The external surfaces of the casing segments are perfectly smooth and snag free, and the antenna circuit is insulated and located inside of the dry antenna structure.

It will be apparent that other modifications and variations may be effected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. A retractable antenna structure adapted to be installed on submergible vehicles comprising at least outer and inner telescoping segments, an antenna carriage mounted within said inner segment, means for mounting said outer segment on the vehicle, at least one antenna probe mounted on said carriage and retractable therein, a first bellows seal coupling said outer segment to the vehicle, a second bellows seal coupling said outer and inner telescoping segments, and a third bellows seal coupling said carriage to said inner segment, a retracting cable connected to said carriage and adapted to be connected to a drive motor for retracting said antenna structure, means for coupling a source of gas under pressure to the interior of said outer and inner segments, and electrical cable means connected to said antenna probe which is adapted to be connected to an electrical circuit means.

2. A retractable antenna structure adapted to be installed in a submarine comprising an antenna storage area constructed in the submarine, a first segment slidably mounted within said storage area, a second segment slidably mounted within said first segment, a carriage slidably mounted within said second segment, a first bellows seal connecting said antenna storage area to said first segment, a second bellows seal connecting said first segment to said second segment, a third bellows seal connecting said second segment to said carriage, at least one antenna probe mounted on said carriage and retractable within said carriage in fluid tight relation therein, a retracting cable coupled to said carriage and adapted to be connected to a drive motor, means for coupling the interior of said first and second segments and said antenna storage area to a source of pressurized gas, and electrical cable means connected to said antenna probe which is adapted to be connected to a tuner.

3. A retractable antenna adapted to be installed in a submarine comprising an antenna storage area, means for mounting said antenna storage area on a submarine,

a casing segment slidably mounted within said antenna storage area, means for slidably mounting and retracting at least one antenna probe within said segment, first bellows seal means coupling said antenna storage area to said segment, second bellows seal means coupling said segment to said antenna probe mounting means, a retracting cable connected to said probe mounting means which is adapted to be coupled to a drive motor, means for coupling a source of pressurized gas to the interior of said antenna storage area and said segment, and means electrically connecting said antenna probe to an electric circuit means.

4. A retractable multiple whip antenna for a submarine comprising an antenna storage area adapted to be installed in the submarine, said antenna storage area having a substantially cylindrical bore which is adapted to slidably receive a cylindrical first casing segment, an airtight container mounted on said antenna storage area over one end of said bore, first bellows seal connected between the inside of said antenna storage area and the outside of said first casing segment, said first casing segment having a substantially cylindrical bore which is adapted to slidably receive a cylindrical second casing segment, second bellows seal coupling the inside of said first segment to the outside of said second segment, said second segment having a substantially cylindrical bore which is adapted to slidably receive an antenna probe carriage, third bellows seal connecting the inside of said second segment and said antenna carriage, at least one antenna probe mounted on said carriage and retracted therein, a retracting cable connected to said antenna carriage and running down the center of said first and second segments and said antenna storage area to a drive motor, said drive motor being mounted within said airtight container, an electrical cable connected to said antenna probe and coiled within the center of said first and second segments and said antenna storage area and adapted to be connected to a tuner, and means mounted on said airtight container for coupling the interior of said container to a source of pressurized gas, the construction being such that said segments and said carriage are extended when the pressurized gas is applied and said segments and carriage are retracted when said drive motor is energized.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,172,117 Beaufort et al Sept. 5, 1939 2,173,095 Byrne Sept. 19, 1939 2,344,490 Brach Mar. 21, 1944 2,965,137 Leeson et a1. Dec. 20, 1960 2,992,634 Peters July 18, 1961

Patent Citations
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US2172117 *May 2, 1938Sep 5, 1939Beaufort John MRadio antenna
US2173095 *Apr 14, 1938Sep 19, 1939Collins Radio CoTelescoping vertical radiator and method of erecting the same
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3495261 *May 8, 1968Feb 10, 1970Gardner Newell JTelescopic radar antenna
US3500429 *Sep 8, 1966Mar 10, 1970IttTelescoping antenna system with translatable payout reel
US3579241 *Nov 18, 1968May 18, 1971Adronics IncTelescoping rod antenna with hinged joint at a medial section
US3704466 *Apr 22, 1971Nov 28, 1972Us Air ForceSurvivable telescoping antenna
US4062156 *Sep 17, 1976Dec 13, 1977Dornier System GmbhExtensible rod
US4647941 *Jun 25, 1984Mar 3, 1987At&T Bell LaboratoriesTelescopic antenna extended by coaxial cable feed
US4907007 *Mar 26, 1987Mar 6, 1990Siemens AktiengesellschaftMount and magnetic field probe for navigating a motor vehicle
US5091732 *Sep 7, 1990Feb 25, 1992The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyLightweight deployable antenna system
US6122866 *Feb 20, 1997Sep 26, 2000Brolaz Projects (Pty) Ltd.Method and apparatus for the concealment and disguisement of antenna structures
US6392606 *Dec 14, 2000May 21, 2002The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyAntenna extension system
US6907839 *Jun 20, 2002Jun 21, 2005Gabler Maschinenbau GmbhMast device for a submarine
US7000561Jun 10, 2004Feb 21, 2006Gabler Maschinenbau GmbhMast device for a submarine
US7165504 *Dec 20, 2004Jan 23, 2007The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy.Antenna linear extension and retraction apparatus for a submersible device, and method of use
US7472615 *Jun 13, 2005Jan 6, 2009A+Manufacturing, LlcPortable insertable probe assembly
US7617745 *Nov 30, 2008Nov 17, 2009A+ Manufacturing, LlcPortable insertable probe assembly
US8418642 *May 7, 2009Apr 16, 2013Irobot CorporationUnmanned submersible vehicles and methods for operating the same in a body of liquid
USRE37559Mar 31, 1999Feb 26, 2002Edward A. MarueTelescoping mast with integral payload
DE102012011985A1 *Jun 16, 2012Dec 19, 2013Atlas Elektronik GmbhMethod for driving and retracting radio antenna of torpedo, involves controlling drive of rope drum while driving and retracting telescopic cylinder such that rope drum unwinds and/or winds determined rope length of traction cable
DE102012011985B4 *Jun 16, 2012Jan 16, 2014Atlas Elektronik GmbhVerfahren zum Ausfahren und Einfahren einer Funkantenne eines Torpedos
DE102012011987B3 *Jun 16, 2012May 29, 2013Atlas Elektronik GmbhSubmarine torpedo has radio antenna that is held by traction cable in retracted position, and rotary driven cable drum which is provided for controlling extension and retraction of telescopic cylinder
EP0791976A2 *Feb 21, 1997Aug 27, 1997Sectional Poles Africa (Proprietary) LimitedConcealment and disguisement of antenna structures
WO2013185749A1 *Jan 30, 2013Dec 19, 2013Atlas Elektronik GmbhUnderwater antenna apparatus comprising a non-stationary antenna and underwater vessel
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/709, 343/883, 343/902
International ClassificationH01Q1/34, H01Q1/27, H01Q1/12
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/34, H01Q1/1235
European ClassificationH01Q1/34, H01Q1/12C