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Publication numberUS3159905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1964
Filing dateApr 23, 1962
Priority dateApr 23, 1962
Publication numberUS 3159905 A, US 3159905A, US-A-3159905, US3159905 A, US3159905A
InventorsBaggett Jr Roy
Original AssigneeBaggett Jr Roy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint roller
US 3159905 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

. 8, 1964 R. BAGGETT, JR

PAINT ROLLER Filed April 23. 1962 United States Patent 3,159,905 PAINT ROLLER Roy Baggett, 3n, 18610 Matthews, Riverview, Mich. Filed Apr. 23, 1952, Ser. No. 189,422 Claims. (6i. ZE-lltl) This invention relates generally to paint rollers and refers more particularly to paint rollers designed to paint the inside corners of a room.

One of the essential objects of the invention is to provide a paint roller wherein the peripheral surface of the rotatable member is formed of frusto-eonical sections defining an angle therebetween less than 90, one section being inclined with respect to the axis of rotation more than the other.

Another object of the invention is to provide a paint roller wherein the large ends of the sections of the peripheral surface are of the same diameter and joined to one another intermediate the ends of the member, and the small ends of the sections are disposed adjacent the ends of the member.

Another object is to provide a paint roller wherein the large ends of the frusto-conical sections are joined in a plane normal to the axis of rotation, one section forming an angle of approximately 45 with the normal plane.

Another object is to provide a paint roller wherein the other section forms an angle of approximately with the normal plane.

Another object is to provide a paint roller wherein the rotatable member has a core composed of a cylindrical sleeve and frusto-conical sections.

Another object is to provide 'a paint roller wherein sleeve and core sections are formed of cardboard sheet material, and the core sections are supported interiorly by a transversely split resilient ring member.

Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds, especially when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of a paint roller ebbodying my invention, shown in use in an inside corner of a room.

FIGURE 2 is an end elevation of the rotatable member forming part of the paint roller.

FIGURE 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary view of a portion of FIGURE 1.

Referring particularly to FIGURE 1, the paint roller is generally designated it) and comprises a rotatable memher or head 12 and a handle 14. The handle 14 has a main shank portion 16 and an end journal portion 18 at right angles thereto. Disc 20 are rotatably mounted in axially spaced relation on the end portion 18 of the handle, and the rotatable member 12 is secured to the disc peripheries to be rotatable therewith with respect to the handle. Preferably this is merely a friction connection between the rotatable member and the discs so that the rotatable member may be replaced when and if desired.

The invention concerns the rotatable member or head 12 which is shown removed from the handle in FIGURES 2, 3 and 4. The rotatable member comprises a core which includes the cylindrical sleeve 22 and the frustoconical sections 24 and 26 which are concentric with and i I surround the sleeve. The sleeve 22 is preferably formed of cardboard or like sheet material which is inexpensive and of a flexible and yieldable nature. The sleeve 22 may be rolled from a flat sheet to the tubular shape shown, in which the longitudinal edges abut at 28 so that the sleeve 3,15%,9fi5 Patented Dec. 8, 1954 section 24 snugly encircles one end of the sleeve 22 and is permanently secured such as glue.

The other section 26 may likewise be formed from a flat sheet of material into a frustrum of a cone, as shown,

thereto by any suitable means,

with the edges thereof abutting along the line similar to that indicated at 30 in connection with section 24. The small end 34 of the section 26 is of the same diameter as the small end of the section 24, and snugly encircles the opposite end of sleeve 22, being secured thereto by any suitable means, such as glue.

The large ends of the sections 24 and 26 are of the same diameter and meet in abutting relation as shown at 36, being secured together at the junction by any suitable means, such as glue. Preferably the abutting end faces of the sections are cut so as to-lie in a plane normal to the axis of rotation of the rotatable member, which coincides with the longitudinal axis of sleeve 22. A strip of tape 3% may be applied over the outer surface of the core sections 24 and 26 adjacent the juncture of the large ends thereof around the entire periphery of the core sections to close the crack at the junction between the sections.

' As shown particularly in FIGURE 3, the junction of the large ends of the core sections lies in a plane normal to the axis of rotation of the rotatable member nearer the right end of the sleeve 22 than to the opposite end thereof. In axial section, seen in FIGURE 3, the peripheral surface of the core sections 24 and 26 are straight, and thelength of the peripheral surface of core section 26 is greater than that of core section 24. The core sections define an angle of somewhat less than and preferably the core section 26 forms an angle with the normal plane through the juncture of the sections at the large ends thereof of 45, while the section 24 forms an angle therewith of 30. 7

The core sections are interiorly supported by a substantially annular transversely split ring 40. The ring 40 is preferably in the form of a wire of a flexible resilient material such as spring steel. The wire 4% in its free state will assume a larger circular form than that shown in FlGURE 4, since it is under compression within the core sections and thus held to a smaller diameter. The wire 4% thus bears against the large ends of the core sections at their juncture with one another, imposing a radially outward pressure thereon. Accordingly the core is strong enough to support itself against deformation when used to paint the corners of an interior space.

The core sections 24 and 26 are covered on their outer surfaces with a soft fibrous material 42, which may be lambs wool for example.

In use, the roller is dipped into the paint to cover the lambs wool, and then the roller may be applied to a wall 46 near the corner 48 formed by that wall with another wall 56). These corners are almost always 90 as shown, and by reason of the less than 90 angle between the core sections 24 and 26, only one wall, in this instance 46, need be painted in the corner at a time. In other words, if one wall is to be painted one color andthe other another color, such as often is the casein the corner between a wall and ceiling, this roller is well suited to the performance of the function. The core sections 24 and 26 are yieldableto conform to irregularities in the wall surface. When the lambs wool covering core section 26 paints wall 46 in the corner, the lambs wool on the other core section 24 is f corner paint can be applied by the lambs wool on the ore section 24, where a narrower strip is desired, the.

ipposite side of the roller periphery providing relief so hat the other wall will not be painted.

The lambs wool is preferably a resilient sleeve which is lot permanently secured to the core. Hence it may be tretched and slipped off the core and reversed when one ide becomes worn.

What I claim as my invention is:

l. A rotatable paint roller head, the peripheral surface If which comprises first and second frusto-conical secions each of which is uninterrupted and continuous, the arge ends of said sections being of the same diameter and oined to one another intermediate the ends of said head, aid sections tapering towardopposite ends of said rotata- )1e head from the joined large ends thereof, the angle ietween the conical sections being less than 90, and said irst section being inclined with respect to the axis of otation of said head more than said second section, the mall end of said first section being disposed at one end if said head and the small end of said second section )Blllg of the same diameter as that of the first section and lisposed at the opposite end of said head, the large ends of ;aid sections being joined in a plane normal to the axis )f rotation of said head located nearer the said one end at said head than the opposite end thereof.

2. The structure defined in claim 1, wherein said second section forms an angle with respect to said normal plane of approximately 45 and said first section forms an angle with said normal plane of approximately 30.

3. A rotatable paint roller head comprising a core, said core including a cylindrical sleeve and first and second frusto-conical core sections encircling said sleeve in concentric relation therewith, said sleeve and said sections being separately formed elements permanently secured together, said sections each being formed of a light gauge sheet material shaped as an annulus to provide the frustoconical form aforesaid, the small end of the first section being joined to one end of said sleeve and the small end of the second section being of the same diameter as that of the first section and joined to the opposite end of said sleeve, the large ends of said sections being of the same diameter and joined to one another intermediate the ends of said sleeve, said sections defining a substantial angle therebetween, a substantially annular, transversely split resilient element compressed within the space between said core sections and sleeve in concentric relation therewith and in bearing engagement with said sections at the junction between the large ends thereof to impose a radially outward pressure thereon.

4. The structure defined in claim 3, wherein said sleeve and core sections are separately formed cardboard elements permanently secured together at the points where they join one another.

5. The structure defined in claim 4, wherein the juncture between the large ends of said core sections is disposed in a plane normal to the axis of rotation of said rotatable member nearer to the said one end of said sleeve than to the other, said first section forms an angle of approximately 30 withsaid normal plane and said second secend section forms an angle of approximately 45 with said normal plane.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2538241 *Jun 25, 1947Jan 16, 1951Drum Products CorpStippling device
US2929089 *Oct 6, 1958Mar 22, 1960Nall Warren LPaint applicator for corners
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3662422 *Jul 22, 1970May 16, 1972Richard D JohnsonCorner paint roller
US5146646 *Feb 20, 1990Sep 15, 1992Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyPaint applicator
US5412832 *Apr 6, 1994May 9, 1995Irven; NeilEdging paint roller
US5855715 *Jul 10, 1992Jan 5, 1999Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing CompanyMethod of making a paint applicator
US6049970 *Apr 15, 1998Apr 18, 2000Northrop Grumman CorporationZ-fiber pinning tool
US6378157 *Apr 12, 2000Apr 30, 2002Schlegel CorporationFoam surface conditioning pad
US7337488 *Mar 3, 2003Mar 4, 2008Hyde Tools, Inc.Roller hub with cover and loading device
US7509703 *Dec 4, 2007Mar 31, 2009Hyde Tools. Inc.Roller hub with cover and loading device
US20030217427 *Mar 3, 2003Nov 27, 2003Martin Floyd E.Roller hub with cover and loading device
US20080141480 *Dec 4, 2007Jun 19, 2008Hyde Tools, IncRoller Hub with Cover and Loading Device
EP0047255A1 *Feb 25, 1981Mar 17, 1982GRYPARIS, JohnPaint applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification492/19, 492/29, 15/230
International ClassificationB05C17/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05C17/0232
European ClassificationB05C17/02R2B