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Publication numberUS3160295 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1964
Filing dateDec 1, 1961
Priority dateDec 1, 1961
Publication numberUS 3160295 A, US 3160295A, US-A-3160295, US3160295 A, US3160295A
InventorsRoark Leon S
Original AssigneeClaiborne Sales Company Of Tex
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tile loading machines
US 3160295 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, 1964 1.. s. ROARK TILE LOADING MACHINES 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec.

INVENTOR \M a QN MW m M m l M w\ W km Leon 5. Roar/r WM BY ATTORNEYS Dec. 8, 1964 s. ROARK 3,

TILE LOADING MACHINES Filed Dec. 1, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR Leon 5. Roar/r ATTORNEYS Dec. 8, 1964 1.. s. ROARK TILE LOADING MACHINES 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 1, 1961 ATTORNEYS L. S. ROARK TILE LOADING MACHINES Dec. 8, 1964 Filed Dec. 1, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 I 'INVENTOR 47 Leon 5. Roar/r "1i WWQ ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,16%,295 'HLE LGADING MACHENES Leon S. Roarir, Shreveport, La assignor to Claiborne Sales Company of Texas, Palestine, Tera, a corporation of Texas Filed Dec. 1, 1961, Ser. No. 156,339 4 Qlairns. (Cl. 2i4-l6.6)

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in loading machines and more particularly to a machine for automatically loading ceramic bisque or greenware in racks.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved machine for automatically loading fragile articles, such as ceramic bisque or greenware, in racks whereby it IS unnecessary to handle the articles and the possibility of damaging the articles is eliminated.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved loading machine for ceramic bisque or greenware wherein the greenware is conveyed to one or more elevating stations and lifted into position for movement into racks which are conveyed transversely of each elevating station for receiving and carrying the greenware therefrom.

A further object of the invention is to provide an improved loading machine, of the character described, wherein the racks are automatically positioned in alinement with the lifting means of the elevating station and said station has pusher means for automatically transferring thegreenware from said lifting means to said racks upon the elevating of a predetermined quantity of greenware.

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved loading machine, of the character described, having a pair of elevating stations fed by a common conveyor so that greenware may be conducted to and lifted by one of the elevating stations while greenware is being transferred to a rack at the other station whereby the operation of the common conveyor is continuous and uninterrupted.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved loading machine, of the character described, having a transverse conveyor for supporting racks above the common feed conveyor adjacent each elevating station and means for intermittently operating the transverse conveyor to position the racks relative to the lifting and pusher means of the elevating station.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described, together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein an example of the invention is shown and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational view, partly in section, of a loading machine constructed in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 2 is a horizontal, cross-sectional view, taken on the line 22 of FIG. 1,

FIG. 3 is an end elevational View of the loading machine,

FIG. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary view showing the drive of one of the elevating conveyors,

FIG. 5 is a View, similar to FIG. 4, showing the drive for one of the transverse conveyors,

FIG. 6 is a transverse, vertical, sectional view, taken on the line 6-6 of FIG. 2,

FIG. 7 is a simplified wiring diagram of the first elevating station circuit,

FIG. 8 is a simplified wiring diagram of one of the transverse conveyor circuits,

3,ib9,295 iatented Dec. 8, 1964 veyors 12 for receiving and lifting the tile T from the feed conveyor 11 and transfer means 13 for pushing the elevated tile into the compartments C of racks R which are known in the trade as setters, compacts or kiln furniture. A horizontal, endless conveyor 14 extends transversely of the feed conveyor adjacent and to the left of each elevating station for supporting the racks R and positioning the compartments thereof in alinement with the transfer means 13 and the space between the conveyors 12 of the station. The racks are adapted to be removed from the transverse conveyors 14 and placed in a kiln (not shown) for curing the tile T. As shown in FIG. 3, each rack R may include a pair of open, upright, parallel compartments C having horizontal, spaced, side rails or shoulders S in opposed relation for supporting the tile therebetween in tiers; however, it is noted that the racks may be of'different construction.

The frame 10 is rectangular and has upper and lower pairs of longitudinal members15 and transverse, end members 16 connected to one another and to upright legs or standards 17. Suitable adjustable feet 18 are provided for supporting the legs 17 and the medial portions of the lower longitudinal members 15. If desired, the sides of the frame may be enclosed by thin plate or sheet metal 19. A plurality of horizontal shafts 20 extend transverselybetween and are rotatably supported by the upper longitudinal members 15 for supporting rollers 21 upon which the pair of endless, parallel belts 22 of the feed conveyor 11 ride (FIG. 2). As shown, the feed conveyor may be of greater length than the frame so as to project therefrom toward the glaze sprayer and the belts 22 extend between the adjacent, inner flights of each pair of upright conveyors 12, the over-all width of said belts being less than the width of the tile T so that the lateral edges of the tile overhang said belts. For driving the feed conveyor, a pulley 23 is mounted on the shaft 21 at the right-hand or outer end of the frame (FIG. 2) and is connected by a belt 24 to one of the drive pulleys 25 of a gear reducer 26 which has a belt and pulley drive connection 27 with a motor 28. The gear reducer Z6 and motor 28 are suitably mounted on one of the lower frame members Each of the elevating stations A and B includes a the upper frame members 15 (FIGS. 1, 3 and 6). A

horizontal, rectangular frame 3-9 is fastened to the upper ends of the upright bars 29 and supports a longitudinal medial bar or member 31. Preferably, the sides and top of each superstructure 28 are enclosed by thin plate or sheet metal 32 having opposed openings 33 therein for accommodating the conveyor 14 and the racks R supported thereon. Each of the upright conveyors 12 includes a pair of endless chains 34 supported by upper and lower pairs of sprockets 35 and 36 and having right angular cleats or plates 37 connected thereto and extendmg transversely thereof. The upper pair of sprockets 35 is mounted on a longitudinal shaft 38 supported by the frame 30 (FIG. 6) and the lower pair of sprockets 36 1S m0llI1iI6d on a longitudinal shaft 39 which is suptile therebetween by. its lateral edges which overhang the feed conveyor. belts 22.

For imparting rotation to the lower sprockets 36 "so as to drive the chains :34- of each conveyor 12, a helical gea'r,41 is, fixed on each "shaft 39 and has its teeth meshing with one of a pair of helical gears B Z'carried by a .shaft 43 journaled and 'extendingtransver'sely between the upper frame members 15 (FIGS. land 6). One of the, coactihg gears Y41 and 42 is reversed relative to the other. gear so that the inner flights of each pair of conveyors travel upwardly. t A worm wheel 44 is mout ed on one end of the shaft 43 formeshing with one or a pair of worms 45carried by. a shaft 46, common to both elevating stations, extendinglongitudinally of one of the upper frame members and 'journaled in suitable bearings 47. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, the shaft 46 has a pulley 48 on one end thereof connected by an endless belt 49 to one of the drivev pulleys 50 of the gear reducer 26.

Each worm diforms'a part of a flanged clutch sleeve 51 'rotatably confinedon the shaft 46 between a set collar 52 and a'clutch member 53 fixed on said shaft (FIG. 4). A second clutch member 54 is slidably confined on the sleeve 51 and is urged toward the first clutch member 53 by a plurality of helical springs 55 for meshing the coacting teeth of the clutch members and causing rotationof the Worm v45 with the shaft 46 to drive the worm wheel 44 and its. shaft/t3. For holding the clutch members out of engagement, a pin 56 projects laterally from the clutch member 54 and is adapted to be engaged by a latch lever 57 which is pivotally suspended as shownat 58 from av solenoid'59 mounted on the frame member 15 adjacent andtransvcrsely of the shaft 46. The upper end of the lever 57 is'pivotallyatt ache'd to the outer end of the armature, which is spring-loaded, of the solenoid 59 as shown at 60 so as to pivot transversely of the clutch member 54 and longitudinally of its pin 56, the lower end of said lever being tapered as shown at 61 so that it will engage said pin as itpivots'inwardly and move said clutch member out of engagement with the first clutch member 53.

The transfer means 13 of each of the elevating'stations I A and B includes an elongate, upright, flat pusher r'nern her or plate 62 of a width less than the distance between the angular cleats 37 of the inner flights of the upright A horizontal bar or rod 63 extends from the right-hand or outer end of the frame 16 and is pivotally suspended from an'overlying bracketed, which projects horizontally from the framefifl of the superstructure 23,

by two pairs of armsor links 65 and 66. In addition to being pivoted to the bar 63 and bracket '64, each pair .of arms 65 and 66 has limitedpivotalconnection 67and 68, respectively, at the adjacent ends of the armswhereby the lower arms may 'pivot upwardly only relative to the upper arms. The corresponding arms of the pairs of arms are parallel, and of the same length so that the bar is maintained in parallel relation to the bracket upon pivotal movement of said arms. An extension 69 upstands from the upper arm of the. outer pair of arms 65 for pivotal connection with the piston rod 71 of a horizontal pressure fluid cylinder 72 which overliesand is supported by the medial bar 31 of the superstructure 28. Air or other fluid under pressure 'is suppliedby. a line 73 to the cylinder 72,,which has 'a spring-pressed piston (not shown), and the admission and exhaust of the fluid is 'bar 92.

controlled by a solenoid 74. Due to this arrangement, when the piston rod 71 is ejected from the cylinder, the pairs of arms 65 and 66 are pivoted clockwise about the pivot axis of the bracket 64 to swing the bar 63 and plate 62 through the space between the inner flights of the upright conveyors. Upon retraction of the piston rod, the transfer means 13 moves counterclockwise toits original position.

Each transverse conveyor 14 includes an elongate, rectangular bed or frame 75 overlying the feed conveyor 11 and extending through the opposed openings 33 of the superstructure 28 of each of the elevatingstations'A and B (FIGS. 1 and 3). The outenprojectingends of the conveyor bed 75 are connected to the lower frame members 15 by suitable. reinforcing rods or members 76. Sprockets 7 7 are mounted on shafts '78 extending transversely of the ends of the conveyorbed for supportingthe upper flight of an endless chain 79 having transverselyextending, flat cleats or plates 80 and spacers 8,1 which support and space the racks R. Preferably, longitudinal flanges 82 upstand from the medial portion of the conveyor bed 75 to prevent lateral displacement of the racks. I he lowerportion of the chain 70 extends around one of a pair of sprockets 83 which form a part ofa clutch member 84 journaled on a horizontal shaft 85 as shown in FIG, 5 Theshaft'SS extends longitudinally of the frame 10, being journaled in bearings 86 mounted on the legs 17 of said frame, and has-a chain and'sprocketjdrive connection 87 with the gear reducer 26 (FIGS, 1 and 3). A set collar 88 on the shaft 85 confines each clutch member 34 in close proximity to one of a pair 'of complementary clutch member89 which is keyed on said shaft and which has a collar 90 rot-atably mounted thereon for connection with a forked lever 91 (FIG. 5). The lever 91 is pivotally suspeneded from a horizontal angle bar 92 extendinglongitudinally of the frame 10 and supporting a pair of solenoids 93 and 94. Ajsuitablelinkage 95'pivotally connects the armatures of the solenoids 93 and :94- to the upper end of the lever which. projects above its pivotal connection to the angle bar 92. When the solenoid 93 is energized and the solenoid 94 is d'e-energized, the lever 91 is pivoted clockwise to slide the clutch member 89 into engagement with the clutch member 84 so that the sprocket 83 is rot'ated b'y'the shaft 85 to drive the conveyor 14. The clutch members are disengaged and the sprocket remains stationary upon energizin'g'of the solenoid 94 and de energizin'g of solenoid '93 so 'as'to pivot the lever counterclockwise. As will be explained, pins 96 and 97 extend laterally from the sprocket 83 for actuating a switch $8 which is suspended from the angle In operation, thetile T is conducted from the glaze sprayer to the first elevating station A by the feed conveyor 11. Although not shown, one of the'racksR is positioned with its right-hand compartment C (FIG. 3)

in alinement with the space between. the inner flights of the uprightv conveyors 12 and with the pusher, plate 62 of the transfer'means '13 by operation ofthe transverse conveyor 14. When the first tile moves over the angularv '(FIG. 1 The can 99 is'con'nected'by a lead 100 to a source of electrical current and by a lead 191 to a relay 162 from which a lead'ltlfi extends to the electrical current source (FIG. 7 It is notedthat thiscirc'uit has been simplified since it is conventional. Leads resend connect the contacts of the relay 162 to the solenoid 59 of the, transverse conveyor 14 of the station A and to a lead 106 which extends from an electrical current source to one of the contacts of another relay 107. A ratchet relay 108 has one of its contacts connected "to the relay 59 by a lead 109, to the electrical current source by leads 110, and to one of the contacts of the'relay 107 by a lead 111. The relay 107 is connected by leads 112 and 113 to a second photoelectric cell 114 which is mounted adjacent the cell 99 as shown in FIG. 1 and the beam to which is broken by the movement of the tile by the feed conveyor. A conventional counter circuit or other counting means D is connected in the leads 112 and 113 between the relay 107 and cell 114 for actuating the ratchet relay 108 at predetermined intervals, such as every sixteenth tile.

The relay 1132 is energized by the breaking of the .beam to the cell 99 so as to energize the solenoid 59 when the contacts of the ratchet relay 1118 are engaged, whereby the lever 57 is pivoted counterclockwise and disengaged from the pin 56 of the clutch member 54 to permit engagement of the latter with the clutch member 53. This connects the worm 45 to the shaft 46 for rotation therewith during one complete revolution and imparting intermittent rotation to the worm wheel 44 to drive the shaft 43 and, through the meshing gears 41 and 42, the shafts 39 upon which the lower sprockets 36 of the upright conveyors 12 are mounted (FIGS. 2-4 and 6). The intermittent travel of the upright conveyors is equal to the vertical distance between the rails S of the racks R for .alining the tile with the spaces therebetween and continues until a predetermined number of tile, such as sixteen or other number corresponding to the number of the rack rails, has been lifted. It is noted that each tile carried by the feed conveyor breaks the beam to the cell 99 for energizing the relay 59 which is de-energized when the tile is lifted or moved out of said beam. Although the beam to the cell 114 is broken by each tile, the counter circuit D between said cell and the relay 107 is such that said relay is not energized until the predetermined number of tile is lifted. The ratchet relay 108 is energized by the energization of the relay 107 to disengage the contacts of said ratchet relay and break the circuit to the solenoid 59 and prevent energization thereof by the relay 102. Due to the springloaded armature of the solenoid 59, the lever 57 pivots clockwise into engagement with the pin 56 of the clutch member 54 upon each de-energization of said solenoid and moves said clutch member out of engagement with the clutch member 53 to stop the travel of the upright conveyors 12.

, A third photoelectric cell 115 is mounted adjacent the cells 99 and 114 and the beam thereto is broken by the movement of the tile by the feed conveyor 11. As

. shown in FIG. 9, leads 116 and 117 connect the cell 115 to a relay 118 from the contacts of which leads 119 and 120 extend to an electrical current source and to a holding relay 121. A conventional counter circuit or other counting means E is connected in the leads 116 and 117 between the cell 115 and relay 113 for actuating said relay at predetermined intervals, such as every sixteenth tile. The lead 119 is connected by a lead 122 to the holding relay and leads 123 and 124 extend from the contacts of said relay to a ratchet relay 125 and to a lead 126 also connected to the ratchet relay, the lead 124 extending to a normally-closed switch 127 mounted on the upper arm 66 of the transfer means 13 of the second elevating station B. A lead 128 connects the switch 127 to an identical switch 129, of the transfer means 13 of the elevating station A, from which a lead 130 extends to the lead 120. The switches 127 and 129 are adapted to be opened by engagement with the brackets 64 upon clockwise pivoting of the arms 66 and inward reciprocation of the pusher plate 62 to break the circuit to and release the holding relay 121. A lead 131 connects the holding relay to a lead 132 which extends from the electrical current source to the solenoid 74 which controls the supply of pressure fluid to the cylinder 72 of the elevating station A. The latter solenoid is connected by a lead 133 to one of the contacts 143 of the ratchet relay 125, the lead 132 and the other cont act 142 of said ratchet relay being connected by leads 134 and 135 to the solenoid 74 of the elevating a 94 which engage and disengage the clutch members 84 station B, and a lead 136 extends from the lead, 134 to said ratchet relay. Switches 137 and 139, connected by leads 138 and 141) to an electrical current source and ratchet relays 141 (FIG. 8), are mounted on the brackets 64 for engagement and actuation by the links 70 to energize the relays 141 upon counterclockwise pivoting of the arms 65 and 66 and outward reciprocation of the pusher plates 62. As will be explained, each ratchet relay 141 controls the energization of the solenoids 93 and 94 for engaging and disengaging the clutch members 84 and 89 of each transverse conveyor 14.

Since the ratchet relay has separate contacts 142 and 143 connected to the leads and 133, only one of the transfer means 13 is actuated at a time. The contact 143 of the lead 133 is shown engaged in FIG. 9 for actuating the transfer means of the elevating station A. Upon energization of the relay 118 by breaking of the beam to the cell 115, the holding relay 121 is energized so as to energize the ratchet relay and the solenoid 74 for admitting pressure fluid to the cylinder 72 and thereby actuate the transfer means 13 of the elevating station A. The circuit between the cell 115 and relay 118 is such that the relay is not energized until a predetermined number of tile, such as eight or one-half of the number lifted, are moved past the first station A by the feed conveyor 11. As has been explained, admission of pressure fluid to the cylinder causes ejection of the piston rod 71 and clockwise pivoting of the arms 65 as well as the arms 66 so as to reciprocate the pusher bar 63 and plate 62 inwardly for pushing the tile T from between the inner flights of the upright conveyors 12 into the right-hand compartment C of the rack R (FIG. 3). When the pusher plate reaches the end of its inner stroke, the switch 129 engages the bracket 64 and breaks the circuit to and releases the holding relay 121 so as to de-energize the solenoid 74 and permit the escape of pressure fluid from the cylinder 72 whereby the piston rod is retracted and pivots the arms 65 and 66 counterclockwise to impart outward reciprocation to the pusher bar and plate (FIG. 1).

Since the elevating stations A and B are spaced apart a distance equal to the length of five tile and the necessary spacing therebetween, neither station functions during the time required for the tile T to reach the upright conveyors 12 of the second station B. A photoelectric cell 144 and its actuating lamp bulb 145 are mounted at the lower end of the superstructure 28 of the elevating station B (FIG. 3.) so that the light beam therebetween is broken by the tile being moved into overlying relation to the cleats 37 of the upright conveyors of said station. As shown inFIG. 10, the cell 144 is connected by leads 146 and 147 to a relay 148 and an electrical current source and a lead 149 extends between the relay and the electrical current source to complete a circuit which has been simplified for purposes of illustration. A lead 150 connects one contact of the relay 148 to the solenoid 59 of the transverse conveyor 14 of the station B and leads 151 and 152 extend from the other contact of said relay and from said solenoid to an electrical current source. The relay 148 is energized by the breaking of the beam between the cell 144 and bulb 145 so as to energize the solenoid 59 for pivoting the lever 57 counterclockwise to release the clutch member 54 and permit its engagement withthe clutch member 53 whereby the worm wheel 44 and its shaft 43 are driven by the worm 45 and shaft 46 to drive the shafts 39 and lower sprockets 36 of the upright conveyors 12.

During the lifting of the tile T at the second station, as explained, the transfer means 13 of the first station is actuated. Upon retraction of the piston rod 71, the link 70 engages and actuates the switch 139 to energize the ratchet relay 141. As shown in FIG. 8, the relay 141 is similar to the relay 125 and has its contacts 153 and 154 connected by leads 156 and 157 to the solenoids 93 and and 33 for controlling the rotation of the sprocket 33 and 7 the driving of the transverse conveyor 1 Alead 157 extends from the solenoid 9'3 to the lead 13$,w'vhich connects one contact of the tswitch 139 to an electrical current source, and leadsl158 and 159 extend from the lead 157 to the solenoid Y94 and switch 93. In addition to being connected to the relay 141, the lead 140 of the other contact of .tliefswitch "139 is connected by a lead 160 to the switch 98. Leads 160 and 161 extend. from the ratchettrelay to the electrical current source. When the solenoid 93 is energized and the solenoid 9'4 de-energized by the contact :153 of the lead 155 being engaged, the lever 91 is pivoted clockwise to engage the clutch members 84 and 89to causedriving of the transverse conveyor 14 "of the first elevating station A to 'rnovethe rack R and alineits left-hand compartment C with the space between the upright conveyors 12. The amount of movement is controlled by the positions of the 'pins 96 and 97 of the sprocket 83 whichareadapted toengage and actuate the switch 98 fonzenergizing the relay l'dl'and .thereby engage the contact'154 of the lead 156 so as to tie-energize the solenoid 93 and energize the solenoid 94 for disengaging the clutch members. Due to the construction of the racks R and the spacing therebetween, a greater movement of the transverse conveyor is-required between racks than between the compartments of the same rack in order to accurately-position the compartments. Accordingly, theclockwis'e; distance between the pins 96 and 97 is greater than'the clockwise distance ofsaid pin 97 from saidpinj96 and, for example, may be 202.5 degrees and 157.5 degrees, respectively.

, The aforesaid movement of the transverse conveyor 14 of the elevating station A is completed during th 'lifti'ng of the "tile T by the uprightconveyors '12 of the second station B and the lifting of tile at said station A is resumed, Upon completion of thelifting operation at the second station, the relays, 118 and 121 are energizedto energize the ratchet relay 125 and engage the contact M2 ofthe lead 135 for actuating the transfer means 13 of said second station (FIG. 9). The holding relay121 is released by thebreaking of the circuit there-to when the switch 127engages the bracket 64 at the end of the inner stroke of thejtranjsfer means to permit outward'reciprocation of said means andactuatioa of the switch 137 by engagement with the link '70. Although not shown, the switch 137 is 'connected to the solenoids '93, and 94 and switch 98 of the transverse conveyor 14 of the second station B and'toara-tchetrelay, identical to the relay 141, in the manner shown in FIG. 8 whereby said conveyor is driven to position another rack compartment for receiving tile lifted at said station. During the travel of the transverse conveyor of the second station, the. lifting operation is completed by the first station andthe tile on the feed conveyor 11 is conducted to said second station.

The foregoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shape and materials, as well as in the details of the illustrated construction may be made, within the scope of the appended claims,'without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A machine for loading articles in racks having means for supporting a plurality of articles in superimposed relationship including an endless feed conveyor for continuously advancing articlesin a single line, first and second uprightconveyor means in 'alinernent with and spaced longitudinally of the feed conveyor for receiving and lifting the articles therefrom, means overlying said feed conveyor and adjacent each of the upright conveyor means for supporting a rack, first and second means for transferring the lifted articles from each upright conveyor means to the adja'c'ent rack,

fixed means adjacent each orieof said upright-conveyor 'meansresponsive to each "article fed thereto by said feed conveyor for intermittently actuating each one "of said conveyor means,

and second means at the first upright conveyor means responsive to the feeding thereto of a predetermined number of articles by said feed conveyor for render: ing the intermittent actuating means inoperable and thereby prevent actuation of said first upright con- 'veyor means to enable the articles to pass said first upright conveyor means and feed to the second uprightc'onveyor means without causing operation of said first upright conveyor means.

2. A loading machine asset forth in claim l'incl'uding third means at the first upright conveyor means responsive to the advancement by the-feed conveyor of a-predeterminednumber of articles for alternately-actuating the first and second transferring means.

3. A machine for loading fragile articles in rackshaving means for supporting a plurality of the articles in superimposed relationship including an endless feed conveyor for continuously "advancing fragile articles in a single line with opposed edge por tions of the articles-projecting laterally therefrom,

first and second elevating stations 'in alinement with and spaced longitudinally of the feed conveyor,

a pair of coactingbndless upright conveyors at each -of the elevating stationshaving inner flights on opposite sides of said feed conveyor for receiving and lifting therefrom'the articles by their edgeportions,

means overlying said feed conveyor at each station for'supporting a rack in close proximity to the inner flights of'the pair of upright conveyors of the station,

a pusher member at each station and movable longitudinallyof said feed conveyor between said inner flights of'said upright conveyors for engaging and pushing a plurality of the lifted articles from said flights into the adjacent rack, 7

means fixed at each station responsive to each article advanced by said feed conveyor between said inner conveyor flights of the station for intermittently actuating its upright conveyors,

and second means at the intersection ofsaid feed conveyor with the inner conveyor flights of the first station and responsive to the advancement by said feed conveyor of a predetermined number of articlesbetween said inner flights for rendering the intermittent actuating means inoperable and'thereby prevent ac- =tuation of said paid of uprigh-t-conveyorsto enable the articles to pass said inner flights and feed to the inner conveyor flights of thesecond station without causing operation of said upright conveyors of said first station.

4. A loading machine as set forth in claim 3'including third means at the first station adjacent the second means and responsive to the advancement by the feed conveyor of a predetermined number of articles between the inner flights of the upright pair of conveyors of said station'for alternately aotuating'the pusher members of saidfirst and second stations.

References Cited in the file of'this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,606,477 McClelland Nov. 9,1926 1,779,210 Davis Oct. 21, 1930 2,698,693 Nord'quist Jan. 4, 1955 2,936,908 Carothers May'l7, 1960

Patent Citations
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US1606477 *Dec 15, 1924Nov 9, 1926Roy P M DavisRacking machine
US1779210 *Jun 11, 1929Oct 21, 1930Davis Roy P MRacking machine
US2698693 *Dec 29, 1950Jan 4, 1955American Can CoMachine for assembling articles in unit layers at successive stations
US2936908 *Apr 8, 1957May 17, 1960Gladding Mcbean & CompanyTile setter loading apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3977566 *Oct 31, 1975Aug 31, 1976Bell Telephone Laboratories, IncorporatedSemiconductor wafer handling apparatus
US4236858 *Jun 5, 1978Dec 2, 1980G.A.O. Gesellschaft Fur Automation Und Organisation MbhSheet collating and stacking device
US4566834 *Feb 9, 1984Jan 28, 1986Kabushiki Kaisha Komatsu SeisakushoAutomatic palletizing system
US4621969 *Oct 12, 1983Nov 11, 1986Valpak OyMethod and apparatus for loading and unloading a storage and transport rack
US4892455 *Mar 13, 1989Jan 9, 1990Hine Derek LWafer alignment and transport mechanism
US4929140 *Feb 17, 1989May 29, 1990Baker John BRack loader
US5102291 *May 23, 1988Apr 7, 1992Hine Design Inc.Method for transporting silicon wafers
US5244330 *Aug 29, 1991Sep 14, 1993Custom Metal Designs, Inc.Bottler loader and method
US5588791 *Aug 10, 1995Dec 31, 1996Intelmatec CorporationApparatus for sequentially delivering articles contained in cassettes
US6652216May 3, 1999Nov 25, 2003Recif, S.A.Method and device for changing a semiconductor wafer position
US6961639Jan 28, 2003Nov 1, 2005Recif, Societe AnonymeApparatus and process for identification of characters inscribed on a semiconductor wafer containing an orientation mark
US7108476Oct 24, 2003Sep 19, 2006Recif Technologies SasMethod and device for changing a semiconductor wafer position
EP0616183A1 *Jan 15, 1994Sep 21, 1994HEINRICH ZEIDLER, Maschinenfabrik GmbH & Co. KGCharging device for a firing furnace
WO1988009303A1 *May 23, 1988Dec 1, 1988Hine Design IncMethod and apparatus for aligning silicon wafers
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/331.13, 414/564, 414/280
International ClassificationB65G49/05, B65G49/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65G49/085
European ClassificationB65G49/08B