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Publication numberUS3160317 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 8, 1964
Filing dateNov 6, 1962
Priority dateNov 6, 1962
Publication numberUS 3160317 A, US 3160317A, US-A-3160317, US3160317 A, US3160317A
InventorsHambro Herbert A
Original AssigneeVeritas Company Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic system for supplying alkali and detergent to commercial laundry washing machines
US 3160317 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 8, 1964 H. A. HAMBRO 3,160,317 AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT TO COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINES Filed Nov. 6, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 TANK FILLING I a CONNECTIONS I l v 1 '1 1 ea M "1 q DETERGENT ALKALI SILICATE CAUSTlC MIX -7|"- 3 I I PUMP z"! 58 I V 4 METER WATERSUPPLY 6E METER v 1 a 4/ 39 MANUAL FILLING LINES AUTOMATIC 40 40 40 DISPENSERS 36 35' i313 l a;

l l l WASHER WASHER WASHER WASHER WASHER WASHER N0.l. No.2. NO.3. NO.4. NO. 5. No.6.

I 32129823302 11% e2 3 fl.Haa2Zuq Dec. 8, 1964 H. A HAMBRO 3,160,317

AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT T0 COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINES Filed Nov. 6, 1962 5 SheetsSheet 2 DETERGE T I l I CAUSTIC PUMP I WATER SUPPLY by Ma 0.

fltihmuey Dec. 8, 1964 H. A. HAMBRO 3,160,317

AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT TO COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINES Filed Nov. 6, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 WHEEL Dec. 8, 1964 H. A. HAMBRO 3,160,317

AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT TO COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINES Filed Nov. 6, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 AIR 8/ as ea se 69 1320832203": flea beau? ulflcmzfwo, by Q m/iwm Dec. 8, 1964 H. A. HAMBRO 3,160,317

AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT T0 COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MACHINES Filed Nov. 6, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 SERVICE DISCONNECT 1219.6. SWITCH CIRCUIT BREAKER DISTRIBUTION PANEL DISOONNEG SCONNEOT SWITCH SWITCH MOTOR MOTOR STARTING STARTING SWITCH SW ITOH E MOTOR MOTOR -L STARTING STARTING fi Lg a fi] E SWITCH SWITCH FLOAT 1 WATER I SWITCH I METER \CONTACTOR/ l ALKALH {cAus'ncH SILICATE| I H PUMP I PUMP by W.

fltfozney AUTOMATIC SYSTEM FOR SUPPLYING ALKALI AND DETERGENT T COMMERCIAL LAUNDRY WASHING MAQHINES Herbert A. Hambro, Milton, Mass, assignor to The Veritas Company, Inc., Medway, Mass, a corporation of Massachusetts 7 Filed Nov. 6, 1962, Ser. No. 235,641 Claims. (Cl. 222

This invention relates to a method of automatically feeding cleansing ingredients to the washing machines or wash Wheels of industrial laundries, and pertains more particularly to a novel method of delivering liquid ingredients or supplies, in controllable proportions, from storage tanks directly to the Wash wheels.

,The supplies or ingredients are those customarily used by industrial or commercial laundries, namely, an alkali such as caustic soda mixed with a silicate, such as sodium silicate, and a non-ionic or anionic detergent, but these ingredients are stored and delivered as liquids rather than as powders.

The principal purpose of the invention is to provide a completely automatic monitored system for feeding the supplies, in the desired quantities and proportions, from relatively large storage tanks which may be conveniently filled from tank trucks, directly to the wash wheels in the 7 Wash room, after first mining the alkali and silicate in a separate tank or compartment'and then delivering that alkali mix and the concentrated detergent through separate supply lines to the wash wheel. p

More specifically, the objects of this invention are to lower supply costs and save washing time by using liquid alkali which is less expensive than powdered alkali in the quantities required, and by accurately controlling the vol-. ume of each of the liquid ingredients according to the desired washing formula; to lower production expense by eliminating manual handling, measuring and waste of con ventional powdered ingredients, and by shortening'the washing cycle inasmuch as'no time need be allowed for dissolving powders, thereby 3 lessening mechanical wear and extending the life of the washed garments; and to permit the essential controls of the system to be operated bylwell known types of sequence timers which have heretofore been customarily used in circuit breaker distribution panels, to control the timing of the Washing cycle of a battery of wash wheels in industrial laundries.

"Further advantagesof the automatic supply system will become apparent from the following description oi the'improvcd method, as diagrammatically illustrated bn system in which the'alkali or caustic ingredient'an'd the silicate ingredient are "combined and mixed with water, and then delivered to the alkali mix storage tanks;

FIG. 3 is a detaileddiagram of the piping system for supplying the alkali'mix to the Wash wheels; the piping. system for supplying the detergent being essentially similar thereto; v

FIG. 4 is a diagram of a compressed air piping system for servicing air-operated control valves in the liquid supply systems; and p FIG. 5 is a diagram of the electric control system for regulating the caustic-silicate mix and the supply of the detergent and alkali mix to the wash wheels.

In accordance with the method of this invention, the basic liquid ingredients are stored in large-sized vented tanks (or a single compartmented tank) providing reserp ice voirs for detergent, alkali mix, silicate and caustic; such tanks preferably ,being so located that the three storage reservoirs for the basic ingredients may be filled from tank delivery trucks, and that the detergent and the alkali mix may be conveniently pumped to the dispensers in the. wash room, through separate supply lines, as indicated in FIG; 1 and FIG. 3.

The liquid silicate and caustic are piped from their respective reservoirs to prop'ortioning pumps, labeled silicate pump and'caustic pump in FIG: 2; these pumps being of wellknown and commonly used types, such as those sold under the trade name Proportioneers Treet-O-Unit and operated by compressed air. The respective pumps may be adjustedto supply any desired ratio of caustic soda and silicate, to produce a mixture ranging from sodium meta associated with 'a solenoid controlled regulating valve '18;

thence to a hydraulic valve 19 and through another check valve 20, to the connections fromthe respective propor tioning pumps; and thence past a pressure gauge 21,

through strainers, to a mixing chamber 22 (FIG. '1) and to the alkali mix reservoir. Said reservoir is provided with afloat 23 (FIG. 1) for actuating a float switch 24 (FIG. 2) in said chamben'which automatically stops the operation of the alkali combining system-when the mix reservoir is filled to a predetermined level.

The float switch, the control meter andits said solenoid valve, andrsolenoid valves of the respective proportioning pumps are in circuit with each other and with a distribution panel, as indicated at the left hand portion of the schematicwiring diagram of FIG. 5. That circuit may also include'an electronic conductivity meter for registering the alkalinity, of the alkalirnix, and 'an alkali level alarm, as indicated. The circuit breaker distributor panel of FIG. 5, may bea standard type of sequence timer heretofore used in controlling the successive operations of washing, rinsing and spin-drying in commercial clothes washing machines, in predetermined sequence--with such additional contacts as may be needed for programming the alkali mix and detergent supply systems also indicated in FIG. 5 and described below.

As indicated generally iniFlG. l, concentratedliquid detergent is fed from the detergent reservoir by either of the alternate pumps 31,- 32,to header pipe 33 for a series of automatic dispensers 34 fora battery of washers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, or optionally through a meter 35 to a header pipe 36 for: manual-controlled" supply to the i same battery of wash wheels. V 7

Similarly, liquid alkali is pumped from the alkali'mix reservoir by pump?! or pump 38 to a header pipe 39 for a'series of automatic dispensers 40 for the battery of wash wheels, or"o ptionally througha 'meter'l to aheaderpipe 42 for manual feeding to the wash wheels. The automatic dispensers for detergent and alkali are arranged to be filledto capacity and then to be disalkali mix reservoir to the respective pumps 37 and 38" 3,160,317 Patented Dec. 8, 1 964 are preferably equipped with gate valves 45 for manual shut-down when needed, and with pressure gauges 46; and the pumps are associated with motors 47 and 48, respectively, actuated by solenoid switches 49 and 50 in the control circuit of FIG. 5. The extra pump is preferably provided for standby purposes, in the event that matic dispensers are filled and the check ,valves in the supply lines are closed. Pressure gauges 61 may be connected in the outlets of said pumps.

Supply pipe 53 leads to the header pipes 39 and 42, as aforesaid, and thesupply line may have a pressure gauge 62 and a pressure switch 63. Manual valves are preferably provided, as indicated, in the lines to the respective header pipes, so that the system may be regulated for automatic or for manual feeding of the alkali mix to the washers; and the header 42 has the aforesaid meter 41 and, preferably, a strainer 64.

Each automatic dispenser 40 is filled from header 39 by a separate supply line 65 having gate and check valves 66 and 67; and each, after being. filled, discharges to an individual wash wheel, through a relief valve 68 and a transparent plastic pipe section 69. The filling and discharge of dispenser 40 is controlled by athree way air valve 70 (FIG. 4) which is actuated by the electrical control system of the sequence timer.

The supply system for the concentrated gent is essentially the same as that just described in connection with the alkali mix supply system of FIG. 3, which shows in broken lines the connection of the automatic detergent dispenser 34 of FIG. 1 to the supply line 65 leading to the individual wash wheel. As previously explained, the detergent and alkali arenot mixed together until the mixture is to be discharged into the respective wash wheels, thereby avoidingchemica-l breakdown of those supplies which would be likely to result upon standing intermixed in a supply line.

' The detergent dispenser 34 is also controlled by a A three-way, air-operatedvalve 75 (FIG. 4) actuated by the electrical control system; and it will be understood that the air valves 70 and 75 regulate the filling, discharge and refilling of the automatic dispensers in timed sequence, and that the alkali dispenser and detergent dispenser, for each wash wheel, are actuated simultaneously or separately, as desired and programmed.

The piping for the air pressure system for operating the diaphragm valves of the automatic supply system and the optional manual supply system of the liquid ingredients for the washer is d-iagnamrned in FIG. 4.

liquid deterfeeding excess alkali back to the reservoir when'the auto-' w The supply of compressed air enters apipe 81 equipped I with gate valves 82 and a strainer 83, and having a branch line 84 leading through a globe valve 85 to a relief valve 86, and another branch line 87 leading through a reducing valve 88 and a globe valve 89 back to main line 81 near an adjustable pressure:valve;,90

having a gauge 91. The air line then branches to the air valves 76 and 75 of the respective automatic dispensers 40 and 34 for each wash wheel, and to the manu- I ally actuated air valves 73 and 9 2 for regulating the supply of alkali and detergent respectively by hand. It

will be understood that air valve 92 would be operated by a separate push button 93. c r

It will be understood that the electric circuits diaa grammed in 'FIG. 5 .are controlled by conventional switches on a monitoring panel, the operation of the sequence timer being regulated by a conventional programin g chart. 6

The automatic flow system for supplying liquid ingredients to the wash wheels of industrial laundries, as :herein disclosed, conveniently and efiiciently achieves the objectives of this invention, as previously set forth. Substantial economies are achieved with increased output in a shorter time period, by utilizing stored liquid alkali, automatic measuring controls which precisely regulate the washing formula, thereby eliminating manualmixing, spillage, and dangerto personnel. It hasbeen found that seven loads of industrialwash may be washed, with uniform quality, by the use of this completely automatic method, in the time normally required for six loads, per machine per day, thus increasing productivity cate and caustic; pumping a mixture of a metered quan-v tity of water, a proportioned quantity of the liquid caustic and a proportioned quantity of the liquid sili- 'cate to said fourth separate reservoir, to provide an.

alkali mix; pumping the alkali from its reservoir through a flow line to a wash wheel area; pumping the concentrated detergent from its reservoir through a separate flow line to said wash wheel area; dispensing a predetermined quantity of'said alkali mix and said concentrated detergent from said respective flow lines into said wash wheel; and electrically controlling the operating of said pumping steps. 7

2. A method as described in claim 1, including the further step of electrically controlling the dispensing step in time sequence with relation to the electrical control of said pumping steps. I p i 3. A method described in claim 2, including the further steps of pumping the alkalirnix and the detergent to separate refillable dispensers of predetermined capacity, separately dispensing the alkali and detergent from the dispensers to the washwheel, refilling said dispensers, and electrically controlling the filling, dispensing and refilling of said dispensers by said electrical controlling step. 7 I

4. A.method as described in claim 3, including the further step of controlling the filling, dispensing and refilling of said dispensers by valves regulated by said electrical controlling step and actuating said valves by compressed air. 7 V v 5. A method as described in claim 3, including the further step of providing alternative supply lines and manuallycontrolled valves therefor for optionally dispensing the alkali mix and the detergent from said dispensers to said wash wheels.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS RAPHAEL M. LUPO, Primary Examiner.

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3251508 *Dec 27, 1963May 17, 1966Standard Oil CoAsphalt blending system
US3336767 *Jan 11, 1966Aug 22, 1967Ael Products IncAutomatic chemical dispensing system
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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/1, 222/504, 68/17.00R, 222/135, 137/263, 8/137
International ClassificationB01F15/04, B01F3/08, D06F39/02
Cooperative ClassificationD06F39/022, B01F3/088, B01F2215/0077, B01F15/0454
European ClassificationB01F3/08P, B01F15/04H5, D06F39/02B