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Publication numberUS3161932 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1964
Filing dateApr 15, 1963
Priority dateApr 15, 1963
Publication numberUS 3161932 A, US 3161932A, US-A-3161932, US3161932 A, US3161932A
InventorsRussell Anne Seymour
Original AssigneeRussell Anne Seymour
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Magnetic fastener
US 3161932 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1964 A. s. RUSSELL 3,161,932

MAGNETIC FASTENER Filed April 15, 1963 INVENTOR.

27 5| 5 s 21 20 N N S 5 ANNE s. RUSSELL F5 5 BY 5% M W- ATTORNEYS United States Patent 3,161,932 MAGNETEC FASTENER Anne Seymour Russeil, 944 67 th Road, Forest Hills, N.Y. Filed Apr. 15, 1963, Ser. No. 272,910 4 Claims. (Qt. 24-203) This invention relates to closures and closure fasteners for garments, particularly for baby garments and other fragile fabrics.

The buttons, zippers, snap fasteners, and hooks and eyes of the prior art are difficult to manage with a squirming baby to hold and only one hand to work with. Magnet fasteners have been proposed for raincoats and the like but their bulk and conformation, uncomfortably large, badly shaped and filled with angles, is totally inconsistent with use on fragile cloth such as is employed in baby garments. Other fragile things, particularly for feminine wear also have need for a fastener which will fasten itself, will come unfastened readily, will hold adequately in service, will not bunch in use or in storage, and which can be put through a washer and be ironed with less care than is required with prior types. It is also desirable to supply, as an article of manufacture, clothing fasteners which can be applied to garment closures by garment manufacturers and housewives using existing equipment such as flat irons, sewing machines, and needles and thread.

The objects of the invention are accomplished, generally speaking, by a closure fastener for garments consisting essentially of complementary strips of magnets, the mag nets of each strip being aligned with like poles in opposition, the magnets in the complementary strips being arranged so that they will be in attractive position when the strip is attached to a closure.

In the accompanying drawings are illustrated the best form of the invention and some modifications of it.

FIG. 1 is a sketch of a baby dress with the magnetic closure fasteners applied.

PEG. 2 illustrates a useful form of the invention in plan.

FIG. 3 illustrates the same in profile.

FIG. 4 is a plan View partly in section illustrating a closure fastener embodying the invention and a method of manufacture.

'FIG. 5 is a cross section on line 55 of FIG. 4.

H6. 6 is longitudinal section through a closure in closed position.

As shown in FIG. 3, a simple form of the invention includes a strip or ribbon of tape 10 and a complementary strip 11. These strips may be of any durable material such as cloth or cellulose tape to the face of which are applied, as by adhesive of water resistant type, flat, circular magnets 12, 13 which are flat on the side attached to the tape and slightly rounded on the other face. Magnets 12 have their north poles in the center and their south poles at the circumference. Magnets 13 have their south poles at the center and their north poles at the rim. Such magnets may be made by methods now in existence which form no part of this invention. The magnets 12 are spaced apart somewhat less than the diameter of magnets 13 and vice versa. The magnets on strip it) are staggered with relation to the magnets on strip 11, as shown in the figures. There is thus an overlap of the magnets at their edges, the N poles of the magnets 13 making contact with the S poles of magnets 12. and acting to close the closure. The strips of tape it 11 are of the same length, so that they may be sewed to the garment without measurement, the top of the tape being sewed to the top of the flap of the garment which forms the closure in each instance as shown in FIG. 1, the magnets falling into proper position when so applied.

"ice

In FIGS. 4 and 5 are shown tapes of pocket type receiv ing rectangular magnets. This form of the invention includes a tape 20 folded upon itself at 2-1 and sewed at 22 parallel to the fold. It is also sewed at regular intervals transversely to the fold as at 23, 24, forming pockets 26 into which can be slipped magnets 27 which are thin, fiat and rounded at the edges so as to present no sharp surface.

ter the magnets are inserted the pockets are closed by sewing parallel to the fold. Enough material is left outside the magnets to allow the sewing of the tapes of the garment.

FIG. 6 is a longitudinal section through a part of a tape as applied to a garment and closed. The flips 3t 31 of the garment have attached thereto the tapes of FIG. 4, including magnets 27, 27'. The near poles of the adjacent ma nets are of the same sign, but the signs differ in the tapes, so that the N poles are opposed in tape 31 and the S poles in tape 30.

The arrangement of the poles in opposition causes the magnets of one tape to repel each other, tending to prevent crumpling of the flaps of the garment. Folding between magnets can also be prevented by slightly stiffening the tape, not enough to prevent flexibility but enough to offer some opposition to the attraction of the magnets during handling. Various stiffening processes, for instance starching, and various flexible but somewhat stiff fabrics are known, for instance those which have been sized or given a plastic resin treatment.

The advantages of the invention to mothers are very great, as all fumbling for fasteners or snap, hook, button or zipper type, is eliminated. The closure fasteners can be sold in strips appropriately marked for application. They are as useful to the housewife as to the manufacturer. They need not be more bulky than fasteners already in use and are less bulky than some. In FIG. 6 of the drawing the magnets need be only to thick. They are covered by cloth and their length and width can be as desired, for instance, long and A wide. The magnets of FIG. 2 are dome shaped or frusto-conical as clearly shown upon FIG. 3 so that the total thickness when in use is less than the combined thickness of two magnets. They can be any shape and size consistent with the intended use.

As many apparently widely different embodiments of the present invention may be made Without departing from the spirit and scope thereof, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific embodiments.

What is claimed is:

1. In a closure fastener for a garment, first and second ribbon-like strips of flexible material each adapted to be secured to and along a respective closure edge of the garment, and a multiplicity of like, discrete, thin, wafer-like circular magnets fixed to and along each said strip in faceto-face relation therewith, the center points of the magnets of each strip defining a line parallel with an edge of its respective strip, the spacing between contiguous magnets of each strip being slightly less than the corresponding diameter of the magnets measured in and along said line so that each magnet of one strip may be superposed over and in contact with two contiguous magnets of the other strip to partially nest therebetween, each magnet of said first strip having a positive pole at each intersection with its periphery of its said line, and a negative pole intermediate said positive poles, each magnet of said second strip having a negative pole at each intersection with its periphery of its said line, and a positive pole intermediate said negative poles.

2. The fastener of claim 1, each said magnet being fiusto-conical and having its face of larger diameter in contact with its respective strip.

3. As an article of manufacture, a ribbon-like strip of flexible material adapted to be secured to and along an edge of a closure flap of a garment, and a multiplicity of like, thin, fiat, discrete magnets of regular geometrical outline, each having a center point, said magnets being fixed to said strip in uniformly-spaced relation along and with respect to an edge thereof, the spacing between contiguous magnets in the line defined by their center points being less than the corresponding dimension of the magnets measured in and along said line, each said magnet having its polar areas centered substantially in said line, there being areas of one polarity at the intersection of said line with the respective edges of each said magnet, and an area of opposite polarity between said first-named areas.

4. In a closure fastener for a garment, first and second ribbon-like strips of flexible material each adapted to be secured to and along a respective closure edge of the garment, and a multiplicity of like, discrete, thin, Wafer-like magnets of regular geometrical perimeter fixed to and along each said strip in face-to-face relation therewith, the center points of the magnets of each strip defining a line parallel with an edge of its respective strip, the spacing between contiguous magnets of each strip being slightly less than the corresponding dimension of the magnets measured in and along said line so that the magnets of one strip may be superposed over and in contact with those of the other strip to partially nest therebeteewn, each magnet of said first strip having positive poles at the intersection of said line with its perimeter and a negative pole intermediate said positive poles, each magnet of the second strip having negative poles at the intersection of said line with its perimeter and a positive pole intermediate said negative poles, whereby unlike poles are contiguous when said strips are superposed as aforesaid.

References (Jited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,212,326 8/40 Piken 24201.2 2,319,292 5/43 Boggs 2420l.2 2,389,298 11/45 Ellis 2420l.2 2,649,330 8/53 Schamel 24201,2 3,008,299 111/61 Kurt 24201,2 3,102,314 9/63 Alderfer 2420l.2

FOREIGN PATENTS 552,740 12/56 Italy.

M. HENSON WOOD, JR., Primary Examiner.

DONLEY J. STOCKING, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2212326 *Jul 13, 1938Aug 20, 1940Irving J PikenMagnetically held curtain
US2319292 *Jan 2, 1941May 18, 1943Richards Boggs & King IncGarment
US2389298 *Mar 27, 1943Nov 20, 1945Ellis RobertApparel fastener
US2649330 *Jun 29, 1951Aug 18, 1953Gen Motors CorpAutomatic rear quarter weather seal for automobile bodies with convertible tops
US3008209 *Nov 28, 1958Nov 14, 1961Kurt Franklin TMagnetic fastener
US3102314 *Oct 1, 1959Sep 3, 1963Sterling W AlderferFastener for adjacent surfaces
IT552740B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4802523 *Jul 13, 1983Feb 7, 1989Richard A. ScholtenBlanket shade for window frame
US5545157 *May 2, 1995Aug 13, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationPanty shield
US5558662 *Apr 20, 1994Sep 24, 1996Kimberly-Clark CorporationAbsorbent article having an attachment mechanism and a method of attaching
US5604960 *May 19, 1995Feb 25, 1997Good; Elaine M.Magnetic garment closure system and method for producing same
US5681304 *May 7, 1996Oct 28, 1997Kimberly Clark Worldwide, Inc.Combination undergarment and absorbent article
US5785698 *Dec 20, 1996Jul 28, 1998Kimberly-Clark CorporationPanty shield
US5884340 *Sep 19, 1997Mar 23, 1999Chen; Chun NanShield or like clothing article
US6301754May 18, 1999Oct 16, 2001Sama S.P.A.Magnetic closure device for clothing items, leather goods and the like
US6367126 *Mar 23, 2000Apr 9, 2002Bernard RivkinMagnetic force eyeglass holder
US6412116 *Aug 31, 2001Jul 2, 2002Wayne ClarkArticle with magnetic collar closure
US6434801 *Apr 6, 2001Aug 20, 2002Sama S.P.A.Magnetic closure for items of clothing
US6748602 *Oct 21, 2003Jun 15, 2004Arthur William BarnesDecorative magnetic collar stay
US7373696 *Aug 16, 2004May 20, 2008Brian SchoeningApparatus and method for holding garments
US7409730Mar 30, 2006Aug 12, 2008Boos Jonathan BMethod and apparatus for keeping a shirt collar aligned and fastened, magnetically
US7992264 *May 25, 2006Aug 9, 2011Joseph AbadiMagnetic closure
US8108948Aug 11, 2008Feb 7, 2012Boos Jonathan BMethod and apparatus for keeping a shirt collar aligned and fastened, magnetically
US8403140Jun 28, 2010Mar 26, 2013Aaw Products, Inc.Apparatus and method for displaying tool holders incorporating magnets
US8516621 *Oct 7, 2008Aug 27, 2013Aaw Products, Inc.Magnetic work clothes
US20090094801 *Oct 7, 2008Apr 16, 2009Aaw Products, Inc.Magnetic work clothes
US20100293695 *Jan 30, 2009Nov 25, 2010Graduation Regalia Pty. LtdAttachment of a hood to a garment
US20120180197 *Jul 15, 2011Jul 19, 2012Colette Gartner CoskyMagnetic closure fashion belt
US20120285367 *Aug 25, 2011Nov 15, 2012Patricia Malley ShanahanMagnetic flag
EP0922399A2 *Nov 30, 1998Jun 16, 1999SAMA S.p.A.Magnetic closure particularly for items of clothing
EP0958750A1 *May 18, 1999Nov 24, 1999SAMA S.p.A.Magnetic closure device for items of clothing, leather goods and the like
WO2006075073A1 *Jan 6, 2006Jul 20, 2006FastmagMethod for the production of a non-permanent assembly element and assembly element obtained according to said method
WO2013144990A1 *Mar 28, 2013Oct 3, 2013Youareu S.R.L.Magnetic removable closure system
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/303, 428/900
International ClassificationA41F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S428/90, A41F1/002
European ClassificationA41F1/00B