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Publication numberUS3162117 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 22, 1964
Filing dateMar 16, 1962
Priority dateMar 16, 1962
Publication numberUS 3162117 A, US 3162117A, US-A-3162117, US3162117 A, US3162117A
InventorsIrvin L Young
Original AssigneeIrvin L Young
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Measuring tape printing machines
US 3162117 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 22, 1964 Filed March 16, 1962 I. L. YOUNG MEASURING TAPE PRINTING MACHINES FIG. 1

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

Irvin L. Young wj a fwm afforne 1 5.

Dec. 22, 1964 1.. YOUNG MEASURING TAPE PRINTING MACHINES 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 16, 1962 INVENTOR.

n rm L JL .m M U hf FIG. 2 BY United States Patent 3,162,117 MEASUREIG TATE PRINTENG MAtCHiNEfi Irvin L. Young, 2435 N. Shemeld Ave, Chicago, Ill. Fiied Mar. 16, 1952, Ser. No. 189,276 5 fllaims. (6i. 191-219) My invention relates to the printing of numbers, graduations and other data on measuring tapes, and more particularly to machines which do this work. Measuring tapes are made in different lengths, such as 6 ft., 12 ft., and so on, for home or industrial use; and they are printed on a cylinder whose circumference conforms to the length of the tape to be printed. Thus, since a cylinder is required for printing each length of the tape measure, it is apparent that the printing equipment or machine becomes quite large for the longer tapes, and that an assortment of printing machines is required if tapes of different lengths are to be printed, representing a considerable investment and requiring extensive floor space and attention.

The above situation points to the desirability of a single machine so versatile as to print all conventional lengths of measuring tape, and the main object of the present invention is to provide a machine so constituted in which all the necessary features are concentrated in a single unit.

A further object is to provide a machine of the above character which applies printing operations to basic and successive lengths of the tape in accordance with predetermined patterns of printing required for each length,

Another object is to include automatic means for shifting the printing patterns as unitary lengths of the tape are drawn from a supply roll of the same.

An important object is to design a machine of the carries a pulley 13a for a belt drive 15 from the motor 12.

A reduction drive extends from the jack shaft 13 to a cross-shaft 17 journaled in the frame at a lower level, such drive comprising a pinion 12a on the jack shaft in mesh with a large gear 18 on the shaft 17. A third shaft 20 is journaled in the lower part of the frame, and is adapted to receive motion from the large gear by way of a sub-gear 22 secured by a hub 22a to the shaft 26). The

hub receives and is slidable on a tube 23 attached to the left-hand wall of the frame it), whereby to render the subgear 22 movable from a position indicated at A to one indicated at B by means of dot-and-dash lines in FIG. 1. The large gear 18 is made wide to maintain its mesh with the sub-gear at all points in the movement of the latter.

The shaft 20 extends from the right-hand side of the frame it} through a bearing ltib to receive the hub 25a of a drum 25 which serves as a printing roll for the easuring tape. The shaft could also receive a bearing at its outer end in case its length tends to make it sag and apply the printing roll unevenly. The supply reel for the measuring tape is seen at 2T. The tape T leads from the supply reel to an impression roll 28, the shafts 27a and 17 of these rolls being journaled in bearings The and 10d extending from the frame, as seen in FIG. 1. Inking and spreader rolls 25c and 25d are indicated in FIG. 2.

It is noted that the printing roll 25 has its surface divided axially into a series of sections 25b; and the sections are marked with measure numbersor graduations,

ice

as shownhalf-way around the roll. For example, the first sectionat the rightis a scale from 0 through 11 inches; the second from 12 through 23 inches; the third from 24 through 35 inches, and so on.

The printing roll 25 is shown with a section 2512 in peripheral engagement with the tape T on the under side of the impression roll 28. The sections are designed for consecutive placement in this position as the roll is moved from the position indicated at A-l to that indicated at B1 by means of dot-and-dash lines. This action corresponds to the movement of the shaft 2t} and the sub-gear 22from A to Bdescribed before; and the movement of the shaft hub 22a is resisted by a spring 34} coiled on the shaft.

It is the purpose of the arrangement just described to print the measuring tape with consecutive portions of a measuring scale, such as the first foot, the second foot, and so on. Thus, when the first section of the printing roll at the right-as seen in FIG. lis positioned opposite the tape T, it will print the markings for the first foot in the measuring scale. When the printing roll is shifted to the right the width of one section, then the markings for the second foot in the measuring scale are printed, and so on, the illustration showing the roll positioned to print the fifth foot in the measuring scale. In order to avoid friction with the tape, or the smearing of the same, the printing roll is only shifted as described when it is turned with its plain surface facing the tape, instead of its higher embossed printing surface doing so.

The movements of the shaft 20 to shift the printing roll as stated are induced by a vertical arm 32 pivoted with its lower end, as shown at 32a, to a bracket 34 projecting from the left-hand side of the frame 10, as seen in FIG. 1. This arm carries a shifter fork 35 applicable with a ball-bearing coupling 37 to the shaft 20. Thus, the latter may be shifted While in rotation.

The shifting feed of the shaft is induced at each halfturn of the impression roll 28, whose diameter is the same as that of the large gear 118 The control for this action originates with a disc 4%) carried by the crossshaft 17, the disc having a pair of diametrically-spaced cams ltia. A bracket 42 is carried by the machine frame opposite the disc, the bracket having a follower 43 suspended pivotally at 430. The follower has a verticallyjournaled roller 45 in the rotary path of the disc cams ida, so that the follower is swung to the rightas seen in FIG. 1every time one of the cams 40a impinges on the roller 45. The follower carries a pivoted pawl 46 engaging a ratchet-toothed slide bar 4-8 below it; and the teeth of the slide bar are directed to receive a feed stroke in the right-hand direction when the pawl 46 is urged likewise by a cam, as shown in PEG. 1. An upward extension 32b of the arm 32 supports the left-hand end of the slide bar 48 by means of a pivotin joint 455a; and the right-hand portion of the slide bar rides on a roller 4% carried by a downward extension 42a of the bracket 42. Such right-hand portion passes through an opening Me in the frame it); and the large gear 18 is chambered-as indicated at 13ain order to clear the advancing move ment of the slide bar 48.

The slide bar 48 is normally checked against reverse travel by the action of a check-pawl 51 in respect to a ratchet bar 52 situated below the slide bar 48. The ratchet bar is supported at the right by a pivoting joint 54 with the bracket extension 42a, and rests with its medial portion on a roller 55 carried by the Vertical arm 32.. The cheelopawl 51 is pivoted at 51a to the extension 321) of the arm 32. Both the pawl 46 and the check-pawl 51 ride by gravity on the ratchet teeth below them, but they are designed to be raised clear of the same, the pawl 46 by a solenoid 53 carried by the bracket 42, and the check 3 pawl-51 by a solenoid 55 carried by the arm extension 32b.

It was stated in a previous section that the shifting progress of the printing roll 25 is from left to right as seen in FIG. 1. The steps in that course of travel are represented byholesrSla in a..horizontal bar 57 carried in the lower part'ofthe frame 1t). The spacing'of the holes equals that of the-printingrollperipheral sections 251); and a slide '59 may be set along the bar 57 by means of a key'59a applicable to the hole 57:: which represents the measuring limit to which the tape T is to be printed. According to the example cited, setting the key 59a in the first hole secures the consecutive printing of l-foot measuring scales on the tape, setting the key in the second hole secures the printing of 2-foot measuring scales thereon, and so on.

According to the action of the control cams 40a, the feed of the printing roll is one step during each halfturn of the cross-shaft 17. If the slide 59 is set correspondingly, a stop for the feed is procured when the subgear 22 pushes the button 60a of a switch 60 carried by the slide 59, as indicated by dot-and-dash lines in FIG. 1. This action causes the solenoids 53 and 55which are in an eiectri-cal circuit with the switch 60to raise the pawls 46 and 51. The spring 39 now shifts the shaft 20 to back the arm 32 to the original position. The incidental breaking ofthe solenoid circuit allows springs 53a and 55:: on the solenoid piungers to extend them and re-set the pawls. Since the rotary drive of th'e'printing roll is continuous, the cycle of operation .just completed will be repeated, causingthe unitary printing on the tape to be repeated again and again, so that the roll of tape will eventually be made up of divisions which may be cut apart, each constituting a tape measure of prescribed length. The ratio of the large gear and the sub-gearis 1:2. Since the printing roll is shifted every revolution, the cams 40a are two in number in keeping with theratio stated.

FIG. 2 shows schematically that a wind-up reel 65. is provided for the printed tape. Also, since the printing roll 25 prints only with half of itscircumference, a second pri-ntingroll 67 may be applied to another part of the tape and geared to present its printing portion in alt'ernation withthat of the roll 25, so that the full printingof the tape isprocured in one continuous operation.- If the printing so far involves only the measure numerals, an auxiliary printing facility 69'may be provided for printing the measure graduations at the same time. Also, the machine may be equipped with printing roll installations which impose decimal, metric or other types of scales on the tape, as well as color or special printing, so that the machine will have versatile applications by the mere selection of the corresponding printing roll installation. A machine isthus had which can print all lengths of tape measures continuously on a single roll of tape, with its mechanism compact in size, and the controlfor choosing the lengthaof the measuresin very simple form.

I claim:

1. Means for imposing linear printing units on a tape, comprisinga rotary printing roll in peripheral'rolling engagement with the tape and formed with a series of peripheral sections arranged in axial succession, the sectionshavingprintingxforms for said units, and means for shifting the-printing roll;periodically in an axial course for the individual application of said sections to the tape for printing said units, the rotation of the printing roll procuring the printing of a given' length ofrthe tape, said printing formsoccupying less than the circumference of the printing. roll, and means operative when the unoccupied part of the printing roll faces the tape to return the printing roll to its original position in order to repeat its operation in respect to another length of the tape.

2. Means for imposing linear printing units on a tape, comprising a rotary printing roll in peripheral rolling engagement with the tape and formed with a series of peripheral sections arranged in axial succession, the sections having printing forms for said units, and means for shifting the printing roll periodically in an axial course for the individual application of said sections to the tape for printing said units, the rotation of the printing roll procuring the printing of a given length of the tape, said printing forms occupying half of the circumference of the printing roll, and second means operative when the other half of the printing roll faces the tape to return the printing roll to its original position in order to repeat its opera tion in respect to another length of the tape.

3. Means for imposing linear printing units on a tape, comprising a rotary printing roll in peripheral rolling engagement with the tape and formed with a series of peripheral sections arranged in axial succession, the sections having printing forms for said units, and means for shifting the printing roll periodically in an axial course for the individual application of said sections to the tape for printing said units, the rotation of the printing roll procuring the printing of a given length of the tape, said printing forms occupying half of the, circumference of the printing roll, a second printing roll with similarly positioned printing forms situated to procure the printing of the next succeeding length of the tape while the other half of the first printing roll faces such length, and second means operative at such time to return the first printing roll to its original position inorder to repeat its operation in respect to a third length of the tape,

4. Means for printing a tape in different lengths each composed of a number of linear units forming a measuring scale of corresponding length, comprising a rotary printing roll in peripheral rolling engagement with the tape and formed with a series of peripheral sections arranged in axial succession, the sections having printing forms progressing from one end of the roll to the other to produce a measuring scale for a maximum one of said lengths, and means for shifting the printing roll periodically for the successive application of the sections to the tapein the progressive order of said scale and to an extent corresponding to said length, a control device adapted for setting at points corresponding to said different lengths, and a connection between the control device and said shifting means to render the'latter ineffective when the application of the sections has reached said extent.

5. Means for printing a tape in different lengths each composed of a number of linear units forming a measuring scale of corresponding length, comprising a rotary printing roll in peripheral rolling engagement with the tape and formed with a series of peripheral sections arranged in axial succession, the sections having printing forms progressing from one end of the roll to the other to produce a measuring scale for a maximum one of said lengths, and means'for shifting the printing roll periodically for the successive application of the sections to the tape in the progressive order of said scale and to an extent corresponding to' said length, second means for rotating the printing roll continuously, a control device adapted for setting at points corresponding to said ditierent lengths, a connection between the control device and said shifting means to render the latter inefiective when the application of the sections has reached said extent, yieldable means operative to return the printing roll to the original position in such event, and cam-controlled means geared to said second means then effective to restore said shifting means.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNIT ED STATES PATENTS 1,160,284 Bohnengel June 16, 1914 1,342,803 Gillespie June 8, 1920 1,781,793 Spencer Nov. 18, 1930 2,098,946 Elliott Nov. 16, 1937 2,106,805 Lang et al Feb. 1, 1938 2,174,728 Potdevin Oct. 3, 1939 2,250,534 Higgins et al July 29, i941 2,256,801 Barber Sept. 23, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1100284 *Jan 19, 1914Jun 16, 1914Andrew J BohnengelTape-printing machine.
US1342803 *Feb 9, 1918Jun 8, 1920Edward S GillespieArt of coloring moving-picture films
US1781793 *Aug 16, 1927Nov 18, 1930Harry E SpencerWeight-printing mechanism for scales
US2098946 *Apr 15, 1936Nov 16, 1937Calico Printer S Ass LtdFabric printing machine
US2106805 *Sep 28, 1935Feb 1, 1938American Telephone & TelegraphTeletypewriter
US2174728 *Aug 20, 1936Oct 3, 1939Potdevin Machine CoPrinting machine
US2250534 *Feb 19, 1938Jul 29, 1941Hoe & Co RPrinting machine
US2256801 *Jan 8, 1940Sep 23, 1941Cottrell C B & Sons CoRotary printing press
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4051774 *May 17, 1976Oct 4, 1977Jack Barnes Engineering, Inc.Machine for printing measuring tapes
US4135447 *Jul 22, 1977Jan 23, 1979Jack Barnes Engineering, Inc.Machine for printing measuring tape
US7717036 *Jan 4, 2008May 18, 2010Guojian LiMultifunctional tape printer of tape measure
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/219, 101/74
International ClassificationB41F17/08
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/08
European ClassificationB41F17/08