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Publication numberUS3163423 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 29, 1964
Filing dateMar 26, 1962
Priority dateMar 26, 1962
Publication numberUS 3163423 A, US 3163423A, US-A-3163423, US3163423 A, US3163423A
InventorsGerald D Jackson
Original AssigneeGerald D Jackson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Stock exchange game
US 3163423 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 29, 1964 s. D. JACKSON STOCK EXCHANGE GAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 26, 1962 N20 Imam CALL obnons SPECULATION PUT OPTIONS TIMI NG Rnnn INVENTOR. GERALD DJACKSON A Tram [Y JIJ Dec. 29, 1964 G. D. JACKSON s'rocx EXCHANGE GAME I: Sheets-Sheet 2 w Filed March 26, 1962 INVENTOR. GERALD DJ ACKSON BY I :2 I, I g g 117701911 5 Dec. 29, 1964 G. D. JACKSON STOCK EXCHANGE GAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 26, 1962 mwtohm rain #2- .3. t M22353 .832 in; to 502. 15.85...

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A'T TORNE Y 3,163,423 STOCK EXCHAN GE GARE Gerald D. .Iaclrson, 21 Dauntless Lane, Hartford, Ccnn. Filed Mar. 26, 1962, Ser. No. 182,492 3 Claims. (Cl. 273134) This invention relates to a stock exchange game and parf ticularly concerns a game involving trading operations] in stocks on a stock exchange.

The present invention has educational as well as entertainment features since players of the game will gain instruction in common stock trading practices such as buying and selling long, selling short, put and call options, and the like. The players stock positions are influenced by business news flashes, declaration and passing of dividends, rising and falling of the market prices of stocks and other situations simulating those commonly encountered. by stock traders.

It is a principal object of the invention to provide a stock trading game including a simulated stock exchange board having listed stocks which rise and fall in price, and a stock trading board on which players engage in buying and selling of stocks, put and call options and various other stock trading operations.

Still another object is to provide a stock trading game in which players engage in simulated stock exchange trading operations.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings,

and to the appended claims. in which the various novel features of the invention-are more particularly set forth. In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is a top View of a stock exchange board employed in playing the game.

the lower right-hand corner as viewed in FIG. 1. Play of the game starts at this box and proceeds in a clockwise direction as indicated by arrow 27. Boxes 28 carry designations 29 of various stocks involved in the game. Each stock box 28 has a border 30 30 or 30 respectively colored blue, red or yellow. These colors in the present game represent investment categories. .The blue bordered boxes 39* represent so-called blue chips or seasoned stocks. The red bordered boxes 3W represent growt stocks which pay small dividends but which tend to increase in market value. The yellow bordered boxes 30 represent speculative stocks which move rapidly up or down in market price due to special situations involving the companies or industries they represent. In

each of stock boxes28 is a legend 31 indicating the par value in dollars per share of the stock. The NEWS FLASH boxes 32 32 and 32 are interposed among the stock boxes and serve to signal the players that a new business condition which may affect their. stock positions has been reported as indicated on one of a stack of NEWS FLASH cards 34 shown in FIG. 14'.

A TRADINGROOM-SELLER box-es and a TRAD- ING ROOM-BUYER box 38 are locations where selling and buying of stocks take place. A corner box 39 is designated BROKERAGE HOUSE Where legend 40 indicates the commission to be paid when a players piece occupies this box.

actual stock trading operations...

Inside the margin of board 25 are three spaced rectangles 45, 46 and 47 upon ,which'will be respectively placed stacks of PUT OPTION cards shown in FIG. 3, CALL OPTION cards 46* shown in FIG; 4, and NEWS FLASH cards 34 shown in FIG. 14.

FIG. 5 shows a stack of stock cards 50 each of which has a colored border 51 corresponding in color to that of the colored border 30 -30 of a stock box 28, and a FIG. 15 is a perspective view of a plurality of players r pieces or markers.

FIG. 16 is a top view of the stock exchange board with dials removed.

FIG. 17 is a top view similar to FIG. 7 of part of a modified form of stock exchange board.

FIG. 18 is a perspective view of another dial used with the board of FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is a top view of the dial of FIG. 18 mounted on the modified board of FIG. 17.

FIG. 20 is a sectional view taken on line 2020 of 7 FIG. 19.

Referring first to FIG. 1, there is shown the rectangularstock trading board 25 on which the game is designated SPECULATION. This board has its margins marked Off into rectangles or boxes designated as follows The single STOCK EXCHANGE box 26 is located at stock name 52 corresponding to stockname 29 in box 28; There are five of each of the stock cards, each card being worth twenty shares as indicated by legend 53 on the card, so that for every stock there are provided one hundred shares. The par value of thestock is indicated by legend 54 corresponding to the par value legend 31 in the stock box 28-. L 7

FIG. 6 shows a stack of scrip or play money; which is used in playing the game. The play moneymay have the following numbers of bills, denominations and distinctive colors:

Number of Bills Denominations Color FIG. 15 shows a plurality of disks 56 which may be used as playing pieces or markers. Each piece has a difierent distinctive color. V

FIG. 9 shows a pair of cubical dice 58 each having a different number of dots on each of its six sides. FIG. 11 shows a single colored cubical die 60 having a diiferent number of dots on each of its six sides. FIGS. 10, l2

' and 13 show cubical dice 61, 62 and 63 colored yellow,

red and blue, respectively. Each of the dice has a dif-' ferent number of sides bearing the legends UP and OFF. 7

In FIG.;2 is shown the stock'exchange board employed'in playing the game, assembled with rotatable 33,163,423 Patented Dec. 29., 1964 PUT OPTION box 42 and; CALL OPTION box 44 are locations where the players can exercise put and call options simulating corresponding dials 76. The dials are removed from the board 75 as shown in FIGS..7. and 16, to expose the circular scales 77 marked on the board. Board 75 has twenty-five scales 77 arranged in five horizontal rows and five vertical columns. Names of stocks 81 are marked adjacent the 7 several scales 77. Each of the scales has an outer stock scale on which the dial is rotatably mounted. A pointer 83 is, formed by a radially projecting tip in each 'cutout 87. Radially spaced from the cutout 87 is another smaller arcuate cutout 85 into which extends a projecting tip defining another pointer 86 disposed in diametral alignment with pointer. 83. Pointer '83 .points at stock prices indicated on the outer ring'73 while pointer 86 points at dividend rates per share of the stock on the inner ring 80.

. In playing the game, each player strives to become the wealthiest player and thus the winner of the game. The players match wits against each other by deciding which stocks should be bought and sold and when. Money may be acquired by a player by collecting dividends on stocks which he owns, by exercising put and call options, and by shrewdly buying and selling stocks, whose prices are continuously changing, at a profit.

Starting the Game Each of the players is assigned a different one of the colored markers 56 as his playing piece. Each player is provided with $20,000 in play money bills divided as One of the players is selected by the players to serve as GOVERNOR of the Stock Exchange. He is responsible for taking care of the remaining undistributed money and stock certificates. He records stock price changes on the stock exchange board 75, .The trading board 25 is placed 2 horizontally on a fiat surface. The board 75 may be placed horizontally .or vertically. The news flash cards 34, put option cards 45 and call option cards 46 are placed face down in rectangles 45, 46 on board 25..

Each player in turn throws the dice. 58. The players then take turns in playing according to the numbers of dots uppermost on the thrown dice. The player throwing the highest number goes first, then'those throwing lesser numbers follow in play. If two players throw the same number they throw again and the player throwing the highest number of the two plays first. The dials 76 are set on board 75 to the stock prices indicated by the pan values 31 on board 25. i

The starting player throws the two dice S and moves his playing piece 56 a number of boxes from box 26 in counterclockwise direction equal to the number of dots The stocks initially have the price indicated by their par value on the stock cards and trading board 25. When a stock changes in price this is indicated by movementofthe appropriate dial 76 on'board 75in one direction or the other depending'on whether the price went up or down. A stock price can vary when an event takes place which is inidcated on a news flash card 34. If the playing piece lands on a stock box 28 the player then throws the die 60 along with one of colored dice 61-63 corresponding in color to the color of the margin Bil -30 of the stock box. The pthrown die 6l-63 will indicate whether the stock price has gone After he has made his choice and bought or sold or done neither, he throws the die 60 and one of dice 61-63 to determine a change in the stock price. If the player elects to buy or sell the stock he does so at the existing price shown on board 75 prior to the change in price determined by rolling the die 60 and one of dice 61-63.

The player has the following available choices when he lands on stock box 28:

(1) The player may elect neither to buy nor sell the stock.

(2) If no other player or players own all the stock,

the player may buy the stock or sell the stock short up to 100 shares of the stock at the current price quoted on board 75. Purchases and sales must be in twenty share lots of twenty, forty, sixty, eighty or 100 shares. More than one player may own shares of a stock but the total owned my not exceed 100 shares.

(3) If other players own the stock he must pay the current dividend on the number of shares owned to the owners and may buy or sell short the remaining stock held by the Stock Exchange at the current price.

(4) If all the stock is owned by other players (the Stock Exchange in this case holds no shares) he may buy the stock from another: player wishing to sell at a mutually agreed upon price usually greater than the current price.

(5) If the Stock Exchange 'has stock to sell, but another player owning the stock is anxious to sell, he may buy the stock from the other player at a mutually agreed upon price usually lower than the current price.

'(6) If the player who lands on the'stock already owns it, he may sell his stock at the current price to the Stock Exchange or at a mutually agreed upon price usually greater than the current price to another player wishing to buy it.

appearing uppermost on the thrown dice. The playing piece may land on any of the boxes which will permit the player to buy or sell stock, pay commissions or dividends, draw a news flash card, receive a putor call option, collect money, etc. After the player} has completed his turn at play, the next player takes a turn at play. The players pieces 56 remain on the boxes where they land until the following turns of the players at play.

Summary willing to buy it from him.

5 A player may sell short under two conditions: (1) When he lands on the stock. (2) When he lands on the sellers trading room box 36. Landing on a News Flash Box A player takes the top card from the pack 34. If the news flash relates-to any stock or stocks the necessary adjustments to the price of the stocks involved are made on the stock exchange board 75. If the flash relates to the player the player follows the instructions. in either case, the card is returned face down to the bottom of the pack 34.

Landing on the Call Option Box The player pays the Stock Exchange $300 and receives a call option from the top of the pack ie v This option gives the play-er the right to buy 100 shares of the stock named at the par value price for as long as the player holds the option. Since it can become quite valuable, the option may be soldto another player at a mutually agreed upon price. A player makes money with a call option when the current price is greater than the price at which he can buy (par value price). He

' does so by selling the option back to the Stock Exchange A player pays the Stock Exchange $206 and receives a put option from the top of the pack 45 This option gives the player the right to sell to the Stock Exchange 100 shares of the stock named at the par value price for as long as the player holds the option. become valuable, this option may be sold to another player for a mutually agreed upon price. A player makes money with a put option when the current price of the stock is less than the price at which he can sell it (par value price). He does so by selling the'option hack to the Stock Exchange at 100 times the dilterence between the par value price and the current price of the stock. If the par value price is equal to or less than the current price, the option is worthless. When the last put option is taken from the pack they all must be returned to the Stock Exchange for what they are worth at that time (160 times par value price less'current rice reshufiied and placed face down on the playing board 25 again.

Landing on the Buyers Trading Room Box When a player lands on the buyers trading room box 38 he may buy all the shares held by the Stock Exchange of any one stock on the playing board 25, at the current price quoted on the stock exchange board 75.

Landing on the Seller's Trading Room Box When a player lands on the stock exchange box-26 lie collects from the exchange $2.00 for every share of stock he owns at that time.

Landing on the Brokerage H ozise Box When a player lands on the brokerage house box 39 he pays the Stock Exchange brokerage commissions of Since it can either 1% of his total Worth or an estimated $250. If v total worth. It is figured on cash'on hand, and current,

price of all shares of stock owned.

Selling Short If a player thinks a stock will go up in price he can buy it from the Stock Exchange, hoping to sell it back at a higher price and make a profit. if a player thinks a stock will go down in price he may: sell the stock short' to the Stock Exchange, hoping to buy it back at a lower price and make a profit. In other words, when a player uys a stock he thinks and hopes it will go up in price, but when he sells a stock short he thinks and hopes it will go down in price.

Selling short is selling a stock before one buys it. p This is done by borrowing the stock to sell and repaying it with stock that one buys in the future. This isionly profitable when the price paid in the future to buy the stock is less than the price received when the stock is sold'short;

- When a player sells short he does not own the stock. He ispaid by the Stock Exchange the current price for the stock whichv he sold short. Since he does not own the stock he borrows the stock certificate from the Stock Exchange and turns it face down. This signifies that he has sold short and owes this stock to the Stock Exchange.

The player repays the Stock Exchange in the future by buying the stock. When this occurs the player pays the Stock'Exchauge t e current-price of the stock and instead of receiving a new stock certificate, he returns the one he had borrowed; If the player has not boughtrthe stock at the conclusion of the game, he must pay the Stock Exchange the currentprice of the stock and return the selling short Union States Steel is $400'since he sold 20 shares at $160 and bought it later at $80.

Common Stock Price Changes All transactions regarding the buying or selling of stocks upon which a player has landed must be concluded before a change in the price of the stock may occur by the piayers throwing numbered die 60 along one of colored dice 6l63. When the colored'die indicates UP the price of the stock rises and the dial '76 on board 75 is turned clockwise a number of scale'divisions -equal to the number of dots turned up on die 6% When'the colored die indicates OFF the price of-the stock falls and 'the dial 76 is turned counterclockwise a number of scale divisions equal to the number of dots turned. up on {die 6%). The pointer 83 indicates the stock price.

Dividend Rate The dividend rate of each stock changes automatically 7 as indicated by; pointer 86 when changes occur in the stock price. The dividend rate remains the same .as'long as pointer 86 lies within any one division of scale ring bounded by two adjacent division lines. The dividend rate is indicated in dollars and cents per share of the stock.

7 Miscellaneous Rules Exchange for one half either its current price or par value price, Whichever is less. A player is bankrupt when he owes more than he can pay either to another player or the Stock Exchange. He must convert his stocks into cash by selling them to the Stock Exchange at one half price, pay his creditors and retire from the game.

The Stock Exchange can never run out of money. The Governor may issue as much money as he may require by writing out a money bill on any piece of paper.

If the price of a stock falls to zero the company is considered bankrupt. owning the stock must return it to the Stock Exchange, Without receiving any money. If a player is short the stock he merely returns the stock he owes the Stock Exchange without having to buy it.

If the price of a stock rises to the limit existing on the stock exchange board (for example $240 for Union States Steel) any player owning the stock must return it to the Stock Exchange, receiving that price from the Exchange. If a player is short the stock he must retu-m the stock he owes the Exchange, paying that price to the Stock Exchange.

In both the above cases, when the stock is returned to the Stock Exchange the price of the stock'once again becomes its par value price. i

The game may terminate at any time agreed to by the players prior to or during play, when the one player having the greatest Wealth in money and stock calculated at the current market price is declared winner. The game may be played with as many players as desired, each of whom will have an assigned playing piece 56 and will take his turn at play.

FIGS. 17-20 show an arrangement of dial 76 and.

scale 77 which may be employed on board 75 instead of the arrangement shown in FIG. 2. Between the stock price ring 78 and the dividend rate ring 8% is a circular series of holes 90 corresponding in angular spacing to the divisions of ring 78. Dial '76 has its pointer 83 bent downwardly to engage in the holes 90 in succession as the dial is rotated over the scale 77*. This arrangement insures that the dials Will not become displaced if the board 75 is jarred during play, to accidentally change the prices of the stocks ontheir dividend paying rates as indicated on rings 73, St). The pointer 83 will always be located in one of the holes 90 on each of the scales 77 so that all the dials remain fixed in position until changed by the Governor of the Stock Exchange during play.

The game will impart to players a general knowledge of stock trading practices and will also be entertaining to participants and observers.

While I have illustrated and described the preferred embodiments of my invention, it is to be understood that I do not limit myself to the precise construction herein disclosed and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent is:

1. A stock trading game, comprising a stock trading board having a series of marginal stock boxes designating different stocks and instruction boxes designating different play instructions relating to buying and selling of said stocks, playing pieces movable over the boxes on the trading board, a stock exchange board having a plurality of stock price scales corresponding in number and'name to stock boxes on the stock trading board, each of said scales having a rotatable dial with a pointer indicating the current market price of the stock represented by the scale, a plurality of stacks of stock trading 'instruction' cards disposable on the stock trading board for selection by the players during play, a plurality of cubical dice for determining changes in prices of stocks by the dials on said scales, each of said stock price scales being circulVhen this happens, any player 8 lar in form and divided into equal divisions, and a circular dividend payment scale located on said stock exchange board within each stock price scale, each of said dials.

having another pointer at the dividend payment scale in diametral alignment with the first-named pointer to indicate a dividend payment rate corresponding to each stock price, said stock trading board having a plurality of rec-.

stocks, playing pieces movable over the boxes on the trading board, a stock exchange board having a plurality of stock price scales corresponding in number and name to stock boxes on the stock trading board, each of said scales having a rotatable dial with a pointer indicating the current market price of the stock represented by the scale, a plurality of stacks of stock trading instruction cards disposable onthe stock trading board for selection by the players during play, a plurality of cubical dice for determining changes in prices of stocks by the dials on said scales, each of said stock price scales being circular in form and .divided into equal divisions, and a circular dividend payment scale located on said stock exchange board within each stock price scale, each or" said dials hav- 'ing another pointer at the dividend payment scale in diametral alignment with the first-named pointer to indicate a dividend payment rate corresponding to each stock price, veach of said scales having a circular array of holes therein, one of the pointers of each dial having a depending point engageable in said holes for holding the dials.

stationary on the stock exchange board at each setting of each dial on each scale, one stack of said cards representing stock call options, another stack of said cards representing stock put options, and a third stack of said cards representing news flashes accompanied by stock trading instructions, said stock trading board having a plurality of rectangles within the margin of the board for locating the respective stacks of cards thereon, and a plurality of stock certificates each corresponding in name to a correspondingly named stock in one of the marginal boxes onthe stock trading board and a correspondingly named scale on the stock exchange board, each of said certificates having anassigned numerical share number and an assigned par value corresponding to an identical par value indicated in each of the stock boxes on the stock trading board.

3. A stock trading game, comprising a stock trading board having a seriesof marginal stock boxes designating ditierent stocks and instruction boxes designating different play instructions relating to buying and selling of said stocks, playing pieces movable over the boxes on the trading board, a stock exchange board having a plurality of stock price scales corresponding in number and name to stock boxes on the stock trading board, each of said scales having a rotatable dial with a pointer indicating the current market price of the stock represented by the scale, a plurality of stacks of stock trading instruction cards disposable on the stock trading board for selection by the players during play, a plurality of cubical dice for determining changes in prices of stocks by the dials on said scales, each of said "stock price scales being circu larin formanddivided into equal divisions, and a circular holes therein, one of the pointers of each dial having a depending point engageable in said holes for holding the dials stationary on the stock exchange board at each setting of each dial on each scale, one stack of said cards representing stock call options, another stack of said cards representing stock put options, and a third stack of said cards representing news flashes accompanied by stock trading instructions, said stock trading board having a plurality of rectangles within the margin of the board for locating the respective stacks of cards thereon, and a plurality of stock certificates each corresponding in name to a correspondingly named stock in one of the marginal boxes on the stock trading board and a correspondingly named scale on the stock exchange board, each of said certificates having an assigned numerical share number and an assigned par value corresponding to an identical par value indicated in each of the stock boxes on the stock trading board, one of said dice having number indicating sides, and others of said dice being differently colored and having thereon different numbers of indications of up and down changes in said prices of stocks, each of the stock certificates having a different color corresponding to a color of one of the other dice, each of the stock boxes having a colored periphery corresponding in color to the color of the corresponding stock certificate.

215,665 Phillips May 20, 1879 393,806 Abercrombie Dec. 4, 1888 398,713 Enos Feb. 26, 1889 543,463 Brown July 30, 1895 886,189 Crouch Apr. 28, 1908 934,507 Crane Sept. 21, 1909 1,156,345 Burnap Oct. 12, 1915 1,414,857 Brandvein May 2, 1922 2,039,332 Morrill May 5, 1936 2,174,058 McGennis Sept. 26, 1939 2,611,616 Kloss Sept. 23, 1952 2,666,644 Strehlow et a1. Ian. 19, 1954 2,863,417 Newton Dec. 9, 1958 2,870,735 Hunt Jan. 27, 1959 3,058,747 Nemetsky et a1 Oct. 16, 1962

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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/256, 116/223, 273/141.00R
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00069
European ClassificationA63F3/00A6D