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Publication numberUS3164214 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1965
Filing dateApr 25, 1963
Priority dateApr 25, 1963
Publication numberUS 3164214 A, US 3164214A, US-A-3164214, US3164214 A, US3164214A
InventorsOelke Erwin S
Original AssigneeIngersoll Rand Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rock drill
US 3164214 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. S. OELKE Jan. 5, 1965 ROCK DRILL 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 25, 1965 INVENTOR. ERW/N 5. OEL K N'TORNEY Jan. 5, 1965 INVENTOR. ERW/N 5. OELKE BY A TORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,164,214 Patented Jan. 5, 1965 Filed Apr. 25, 1963, Ser. No. 275,710 10 Claims. (Cl. 17s 7s This invention relates to pressure fluid operated rock drills and more in particular to the control of the flow of motive fluid and spent motive fluid to operate a rock drill of the down-hole type.

In the commonly known down-hole type rock drills the valving arrangement to regulate the flow of the motive fluid to operate the hammer piston of the rock drill, and to discharge the spent motive fluid from the rock drill is usually complicated. The various conventional valving arrangements include longitudinal as well as radial passages in the cylinder wall of the rock drill, slidable porting sleeves about the piston of the rock drill, or other complicated valve mechanisms, all adding to the cost of the drill. These arrangements affect the quality of the drill casing and the eflective working area of the piston, they increase the wear of the associated moving parts, or increase the overall size, in particular the diameter, of the drill.

It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide a novel valving arrangement for a rock drill.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel valving arrangement for a rock drill which simplifies the structure of the rock drill.

Yet another object of this invention is to provide a novel valving arrangement for a rock drill which increases the efficiency of the rock drill.

Still another object of this invent-ion is to provide a novel valving arrangement for a rock drill which is simple, reliable and eflicient.

These and other objects will become apparent from the following specification and accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURES l and 1A are longitudinal sectional views of a rock drill according to the invention, the device of FIG. 1A being a continuation of the device of FIG. 1,

FIG. 2 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 2+2 of FIG. 1A looking in the direction of the arrows,

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the tubular member and resilient member as mounted on the rear end portion of the drill bit of the rock drill,

FIGS. 4 and 4A are longitudinal sectional views of an alternate structure of the rock drill shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A, the device of FIG. 4A being a continuation of the device of FIG. 4, and

FIG. 5 is a cross sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIG. 4A looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawings, numeral designates an elongated tubular rock drill casing formed with a bore 11 within which is disposed a reciprocal hammer member 12 having an axial passage 13 therethrough. The rear end portion of hammer member 12 is in the form of a piston 14, and the forward end portion of the hammer member is in the form of another piston designated 15, the latter being of smaller diameter than that of piston 14. The rear end portion of bore 11 is formed with a piston chamber 16 to slidably receive piston 14 of hammer member 12. Piston 15 of hammer member 12 is slidably received in a piston chamber 18 formed at the rear end of a drill bit 20 which is slidably mounted in the forward end portion of the rock drill casing, the structure and function of piston chamber 18 to be explained hereinafter. Drill bit 20 includes a shank 22 extending rearwardly into the drill casing for receiving impacts delivered thereon by piston 15 of the reciprocating hammer member 12.

The drill bit 20 is retained in the drill casing and engaged for rotation therewith by a chuck 24 which includes an end member 26 threaded into the forward end portion of the drill casing. End member 26 is provided with internal straight longitudinal splines 28 which slidably and interlockingly engage corresponding splines 30 on the shank of the drill bit 20. The chuck also includes a retainer ring 32 clamped between the end member 26 and a sleeve 34 and extends radially into a groove 36 in the shank of the drill bit to limit the longitudinal movement of the drill bit relative to the drill casing. It is to be noted that a portion of the shank 22 rearwardly of groove 36 is provided with longitudinal grooves 33, the purpose of which to be explained hereinafter.

The flow of pressure fluid to actuate the hammer member 12 is controlled by means of a valve 4%) including a conventional type flapper valve 42 mounted for rocking movement about a central tube 44 extending forwardly of valve 40 and held in position by a two piece valve cage 46 and 48 slidably fitted in the rear end portion of the drill casing. Pressure fluid is conducted from a source of supply (not shown) to valve 40 through a conduit 50 in the back head of the rock drill from where it flows through a passage 52 in the valve cage piece 46 and into a valve chamber 54 formed between the valve cage pieces 46 and 48. Dependent upon the position of the flapper valve 42, the pressure fluid flows from valve chamber 54 either into an inlet passage 56 and into tube 44, or into an inlet passage 58, both inlet passages being formed in valve cage piece 43.

Tube 44 slidably extends into passage 13 of hammer member 12 and is of such length that communication between the piston chamber 16 and the passage 13 of the reciprocating hammer member is constantly prevented. With this arrangement the pressure fluid to actuate the hammer member rearwardly is conducted through the hammer member into the forward end portion of the piston chamber 18. As for actuation of the piston forwardly the pressure fluid is conducted through inlet passage 58 into the rear end portion of the piston chamber 16.

Piston chamber 18 is formed by a tubular member 62 which is resiliently mounted on the rear end portion of the shank of drill bit 24) and extends rearwardly therefrom to slidably receive piston 15 of reciprocating hammer member 12. Resilient mounting of tubular member 62 on the rear end portion of shank 22 is achieved by compressing the forward end portion of the tubular member 62 about the corresponding rear end portion of shank 22 while retaining a resilient member 66, preferably made of polyurethane or other suitable resilient material, between the forward end portion of the tubularmember and the corresponding end portion of the shank, reference being made to Patent No. 3,078,827 to Erwin S. Oelke and Ewald H. Kurt, issued February 26, 1963, disclosing a similar structure and the features of the resilient mounting of a tubular member provided for valving purposes.

A space 64 is provided between the tubular member 62 and the corresponding inner periphery of the drill casing for the conduc ance of the spent motive fluid from the piston chambers 16 and 18, as will be explained hereinafter.

Referring to the conductance of the spent motive fluid from the piston chambers 16 and 18, the spent motive fluid from piston chamber 18 is conducted through space 64, grooves 38, and along the side of the shank (groove 36) of the drill bit from where the spent motive fluid is directed through passages 68 and 7t in the forward end portion of drill bit 2%). The conductance of spent motive fluid from the piston chamber 16 is achieved by providing an undercut 72 in the drill casing wall, an undercut '74 in that portion of the hammer member forwardly of piston 14, and longitudinal grooves 76 in that portion of hammer member 12 forwardly of undercut 74 to provide for a passage between the hammer member and the drill casing wall for the conductance of the spent motive fluid from piston chamber 16 to space 64 and forwardly thereof to the face of the material being drilled.

In operation, assuming the parts of the rock drill to be in the position shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A, pressure fluid is conducted from conduit 59 through passage 52 and into valve chamber 54 of valve 43 and thence through inlet passage 56, tube 44 and passage 13 of the hammer member into piston chamber 18. This fluid acting on the forward pressure surface of piston l5 actuates the hammer member rearwardly. When the piston has moved a sufliciently great distance rearwardly and beyond the rearward end of tubular member 62, the spent motive fluid is discharged from piston chamber 13 into space as and flows through grooves 33, '56, and the space between the splines on end member 26 and on the corresponding portion of shank 22 into passages 68 and 7t and into the hole being drilled.

Rearward movement of the hammer member causes piston 14 to cut oflcomrnunication between the piston chamber 16 and undercut 72 causing compression of the fluid in the piston chamber 16. This results in throwing of valve 42 into its other limiting position, cutting off the supply of pressure fluid to inlet passage 56 and to piston chamber 18, and supplying pressure fluid to inlet passage 58 and into the rear end portion of the piston chamber 16. This reversal of supply causes the hammer member to be actuated forwardly until the piston 14 uncovers the rear end of undercut 72 to provide for the spent motive fluid to discharge through undercuts 72, '74, grooves 76, space 64, grooves 38, 36, the spaces between the splines on end member 26 and on the corresponding portion of shank 22 into passages 68 and ill and into the hole being drilled.

Further forward movernet of the hammer member causes the piston 15 to enter into piston chamber l8 thereby cutting ofl the discharge therefrom and compressing the fluid present in piston chamber 1%. Compression of the fluid present in piston chamber 13 causes the flapper valve 42 to be thrown into the position shown in FIG. I to provide for the repetition of the cycle just described. When blowing of the hole being drilled is required, the flow of motive fluid to operate the rock drill is shut off. The rock drill is then raised a sufficiently great distance to permit the drill bit, and therewith the hammer me, ber 12, to move forwardly by gravity until the drill bit is supported by the retainer ring 32 of chuck 24. In this position of the drill bit, the hammer member is supported by the rear end of the drill bit and is held in its lowermost position. The motive fluid is then permitted to flow into valve chamber 54, and, dependent upon the position of the flapper valve 42, the motive fluid will flow either into piston chamber 16 or into piston chamber 18. if the pressure fluid flows through inlet passage 58 and into piston chamber 16, the pressure fluid is permitted to flow freely from piston chamber 16 into undercut 72 and through undercut 74, grooves '76, space 6 grooves 33, 36, the spaces between splines 28 and 3t) into passages 68 and 7t) and into the hole being drilled. If the pressure fluid flows through inlet passage 56, tube 4 4, passage 13 and-into the forward end of piston chamber 18, piston 15 is forced rearwardly beyond the rearward end of tubular member 62 to permit the pressure fluid to flow into space 64 and forwardly thereof to exteriorly of the drill casing into the hole being drilled.

It is to be noted that, although the passage means to conduct the spent motive fluid discharged from piston chamber 16 into space 64 is shown in FIG. 1 to be formed by machining a portion of the drill casing wall (undercut '72) as well as a portion of the hammer member (grooves 76), the aforementioned passage means may rec,

d be provided by machining the drill casing wall only, as will be disclosed hereinafter.

An alternate structure of the rock drill according to the invention is shown in FlGS. 4 and 4A and includes a casing lit formed with a bore 11 within which is disposed a reciprocal block type hammer member 12' having an axial passage 13 therethrough. A tube 44 extends forwardly from the valve (not shown) into the passage 13 to conduct pressure fluid into passage 13 in a manner as hereinbefore described in connection with he structures shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A. The rear end portion of hammer member 12 is in the form of a piston 14, and the forward end portion of hammer member E2 is in the form of another piston designated l5. Piston list is slidably received in a piston chamber 16' formed in the rear end portion of bore 11' while piston 15' is slidably received in a piston chamber 18 formed by a sleeve member '73 positioned re-arwardly of end member 26 and retainer ring 32. It is to be noted that a space 8% is provided between the outer periphery of sleeve member '78 and the corresponding inner periphery of the cars ing to conduct the spent motive fluid flowing from piston chamber 18 through undercut 82 in the rear end portion of sleeve '73, passages 34* in the rear end portion of sleeve member 78 to passages 86 in the forward end portion of sleeve member 78. The spent motive fluid is further conducte through groove 36 in the shank 22 of drill bit 2%, and the spaces between the splines on end member 26 and on the corresponding portion of shank 22 to extcriorly of the drill bit 29'.

The conductance of the spent motive fluid from the piston chamber 16' is achieved by providing an undercut 88 in the casing wall forwardly of piston chamber 16', longitudinal grooves 9'19 in the casing wall forwardly of undercut $3, and undercut 92 in the casing wall forwardly of grooves 5 h, undercut 92 leading into undercut 82 of sleeve member 78. Spent motive fluid is further conducted to exterio-rly of the drill bit as hereinbefore described in connection with the conductance of the spent motive fluid from piston chamber 18'.

Assuming the par-ts of the rock drill to be in the posi tion shown in FIGS. 4 and 4A, pressure fluid is conducted through tube 4-4 and passage 13 of the hammer member into piston chamber 1% acting on the forward pressure surface of piston 15' to force the hammer member rearwardly. \Vhen piston 15 has moved a sufficiently great distance rearwardly and beyond the forward end of undercut 82, the spent motive fluid is discharged from piston chamber 13' into undercut 82 and flows forwardly to exteriorly of the drill bit as hereinbefore described. When rearward movement of the hammer member causes the valve (not shown) to be thrown, pressure fluid is admitted to the rear end portion of piston chamber 16' forcing the hammer member forwardly until piston 14' uncovers the rear end of undercut 38. This provides for the spent motive fluid to be discharged through undercut 8S, grooves hi! and further forwardly as hereinbefore described.

While specific forms of the invention are shown and described, it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made Without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.

l claim:

1. A rock drill comprising:

(a) a casing;

(15) valve means within the rear end portion of said casing;

(c) drill bit support means mounted within the forward end portion of said casing to support a drill bit;

(11) said valve means and said drill bit support means defining a chamber in said casing;

(e) a reciprocal hammer member within said chamber having a passage therethrough;

(f) a tube having one end supported by said valve means and having the other end scalingly extending into said passage for constant communication between said tube and said passage;

(g) said valve means adapted to alternatively valve motive fluid into the forward end portion of said chamber through said tube and said passage and into the rear end portion of said chamber; and

(It) means to conduct the spent motive fluid from said chamber exteriorly along said hammer member and exteriorly along at least a portion of said drill bit support means to the exterior of said casing.

2. A rock drill comprising:

(a) a casing formed with a chamber therein;

(15) valve means within the rear end portion of said chamber;

(c) drill bit support means mounted within the forward end portion of said chamber -to support a drill bit;

(d) a hammer member having a passage therethrough positioned within said chamber and reciprocable between said valve means and said drill bit support means;

(e) a tube having one end supported by said valve means and having the other end sealingly extending into said passage for constant communication between said tube and said passage;

(f) said valve means adapted to alternatively valve motive fluid into the rear end portion of said chamber and through said tube and said passage into the forward end portion of said chamber;

(g) said hammer member having an end portion cooperating with said end portions of said chamber to valve the spent motive fluid to the exterior of said end portions of said chamber; and

(h) passage means formed between the outer periphery of said hammer member and the corresponding inner periphery of said chamber and between the outer periphery of at least a portion of said drill bit support means and the corresponding inner periphery of said chamber to conduct the spent motive fluid from said end portions of said chamber to flow exteriorly along said hammer member and exteriorly along at least a portion of said drill bit support means to the exterior of said casing.

3. A rock drill comprising:

(a) acasing;

(b) valve means within the rear end portion of said casing;

(c) a working implement having one end portion extending into the forward end portion of said casing;

(d) said valve means and said one end portion of said working implement defining a chamber in said casing;

(e) a reciprocal hammer member within said chamber having an axial passage therethrough;

(j) a tube having one end supported by said valve means and having the other end extending centrally through the rear end portion of said chamber and sealingly into said passage for constant communication between said tube and said passage;

(g) said valve means adapted to alternatively valve motive fluid into the rear end portion of said chamber and through said tube and said passage into the forward end portion of said chamber;

(h) said hammer member having end portions cooperating with said end portions of said chamber to valve the spent motive fluid to the exterior of said end portions of said chamber; and

(i) passage means formed between the outer periphery of said hammer member and the corresponding inner periphery of said chamber and between the outer periphery of at least a portion of said end portion of said working implement and the corresponding inner periphery of said chamber to conduct the spent motive fluid from said end portions of said chamber to flow exteriorly along said hammer member and exteriorly along at least a portion of said end portion 6 of said working implement to the exterior of said casing.

4. A rock drill comprising:

(a) a casing formed with a first piston chamber within said casing;

(b) a first piston reciprocable in said first piston chamber;

(c) a second piston in said casing positioned forwardly of said first piston and connected thereto to form a hammer member therewith;

(d) a working implement having one end portion extending into the forward end portion of said casing and positioned to be actuated by said second piston;

(e) said one end portion of said working implement being formed with a second piston chamber to slidably receive said second piston; and

(f) means to valve motive fluid alternatively to said piston chambers to actuate said pistons;

(g) said means including conduit means extending through said first piston chamber and through said hammer member to conduct motive fluid to said second piston chamber.

5. A rock drill comprising:

(a) a casing formed with a first piston chamber within said casing;

(b) a first piston reciprocable in said first piston chamber;

(c) a second piston in said casing positioned forwardly of said first piston and connected thereto to form a hammer member therewith;

(cl) a working implement having one end portion extending into the forward end portion of said casing and positioned to be actuated by said second piston;

(e) said one end portion of said working implement being formed with a second piston chamber to slidably receive said second piston;

(1) means to vaive motive fluid alternatively to said piston chambers to actuate said pistons;

(g) each piston cooperating with the associated piston chamber to valve the spent motive fluid exteriorly of said cylinders; and

(h) means to conduct said spent motive fluid to flow interiorly of said casing but exteriorly along said hammer member and exteriorly along at least a portion of said end portion of said working implement in said casing to the exterior of said casing.

6. The device claimed in claim 5 in which said second piston chamber is formed by a tubular member resiliently connected to the rear end portion of said working implement and extending rearwardly thereof.

7. The device claimed in claim 6 in which resilient means is interposed between the outer periphery of the rear end portion of said Working implement and the corresponding portion of the inner periphery of said tubular member.

8. A rock drill comprising:

(a) a casing formed with a first piston chamber within said casing;

(b) a first piston reciprocable in said first piston chamber;

(c) a second piston in said casing positioned forwardly of said first piston and connected thereto to form a hammer member therewith;

(d) a working implement having one end portion extending into the forward end portion of said casing and positioned to be actuated by said second piston;

(e) said one end portion of said working implement being formed with a second piston chamber to slidably receive said second piston;

(f) said first piston chamber having an inlet port positioned to conduct fluid into the rear end portion of said first piston chamber;

(g) said hammer member having a longitudinal passage therethrough to conduct fluid;

(h) a valve mounted in said casing and having a first inlet passage and a second inlet passage to conduct motive fluid valved alternatively by said valve into said first inlet passage and into said second inlet passage;

(i) a tube connected tosaid valve to communicate with one of said inlet passages of said valve and extending forwardly of said valve and into said pas sage of said hammer member to cooperate therewith to be constantly in communication with said passage of said hammer member to conduct motive fluid into said second piston chamber;

(j) the other of said inlet passages of said valve being in communication with said inlet port of said first piston chamber to conduct motive fluid into said first piston chamber;

(k) each piston cooperating with the associated piston chamber to valve the spent motive fluid exteriorly of said piston chambers; and

(1) means to conduct said spent motive fluid to flow interiorly of said casing but exteriorly along said hammer member and exteriorly along a portion of said end portion of said Working implement in said casing to the exterior of said casing.

9. The device claimed in claim 8 in which the last said means includes passage means formed between the outer periphery of said hammer member and the corresponding inner periphery of said casing and between the outer periphery of at least a portion of said end portion of said Working implement in said casing and the corresponding portion of the inner periphery of said casing.

10. A rock drill comprising:

(a) 'a casing formed with a first piston chamber Within the rear end portion of said casing;

(b) a first piston reciprocable in said first piston chamher;

(0) a second piston in said casing positioned forwardly of said first piston and connected thereto to form a hammer member therewith;

(d) a Working implement having one end portion eztending into the forward end portion of said casing and positioned to be actuated by said second piston;

(e) a chuck connected to the forward end portion of said casing to movably receive saidone end portion of said Working implement;

(f) said one end portion of said Working implement being formed with a second piston chamber to slidably receive said second piston;

(g) said first piston chamber having an inlet port positioned to conduct fluid into the rear end portion of said first piston chamber;

(It) said hammer member having an axial passage therethrough to conduct fluid;

(i) a valve mounted in said casing and having a first inlet passage and a second inlet passage to conduct motive fluid valved alternatively by said valve into said first inlet passage and into said second inlet passage;

(j) a tube connected to said valve to communicate with one of said inlet passages of said valve and extending forwardly of said valve and into said passage of said hammer member to cooperate there with to be constantly in communication with said passage of said hammer member to conduct motive fluid into said second piston chamber;

(k) the other of said inlet passages of said valve be ing in communication with said inlet port of said cylinder to conduct motive fluid into said first piston chamber;

(1) each piston cooperating with the associated piston chamber to valve the spent motive fluid exteriorly of said piston chambers; and

(m) passage means formed between the outer periphery of said hammer member and the corresponding inner periphery of said casing and between the out er periphery of at least a portion of said end portion of said working implement in said chuck and the corresponding portion of the inner periphery of said chuck to conduct the spent motive fluid discharged from said first and said second piston chambers to the exterior of said casing.

References Cited by the Examiner UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,601,733 10/26 Gilman l73-l38 X 2,951,467 9/68 Morrison 17373 X 3,050,032 8/62 Carey 173-73 X BROUGHTON G. DURHAM, Primary Examiner.

MILTON KAUFMAN, Examiner.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1601733 *Feb 11, 1920Oct 5, 1926 Drilling machine
US2951467 *Nov 6, 1958Sep 6, 1960Ingersoll Rand CoRock drill
US3050032 *Dec 30, 1960Aug 21, 1962Carey Machine & Supply IncPercussion-type drill
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3322216 *Nov 18, 1964May 30, 1967Ingersoll Rand CoAnvil for percussive drill
US3712387 *Nov 4, 1968Jan 23, 1973Amoco Prod CoRotary percussion drilling motor
US3986565 *Dec 26, 1974Oct 19, 1976Hughes Tool CompanyExhaust means for percussion tool motors
US4094366 *Sep 30, 1976Jun 13, 1978Abraham GienPneumatic percussion machines
US4280570 *Apr 17, 1979Jul 28, 1981Walter Hans PhilippDrill hammer
US4484638 *Sep 12, 1977Nov 27, 1984West Joe ELiquid inertia tool
US4487274 *Jul 21, 1982Dec 11, 1984Weaver & Hurt LimitedRock drills
US4722403 *Aug 5, 1986Feb 2, 1988Institut Gornogo Dela Sibirskogo Otdelenia Akademii Nauk SssrAnnular air-hammer apparatus for drilling holes
US7198120 *Mar 23, 2004Apr 3, 2007Bernard Lionel GienDown-the-hole drill assembly
CN100494613CMar 25, 2004Jun 3, 2009莱昂内尔吉安伯纳德Submerged hole driller component element
Classifications
U.S. Classification173/73, 173/136, 91/317, 91/315, 91/325, 173/138
International ClassificationE21B4/14, E21B4/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B4/14
European ClassificationE21B4/14