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Publication numberUS3164303 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 5, 1965
Filing dateDec 4, 1961
Priority dateDec 4, 1961
Publication numberUS 3164303 A, US 3164303A, US-A-3164303, US3164303 A, US3164303A
InventorsHerbert L Trautmann
Original AssigneeSemco Res Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Storage and mixing cartridge
US 3164303 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 5, 1965 H. L. TRAUTMANN 9 9 STORAGE AND MIXING CARTRIDGE Filed Dec. 4, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 I N VE N TOR. #525501 fiqz/r/w/z/n/ BY w H. L. TRAUTMANN 3,164,303

STORAGE AND MIXING CARTRIDGE Jan. 5, 1965 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 4, 1961 24-5 INVENTOR.

$525527! [EM MAW United States Patent Ofiiice 3,154,303 Patented Jan. 5, 1965 3,164,303 STORAGE AND MiXlNG CARTRIDGE Herbert L. Trautmann, San Marino, Califi, assignor to Semco Research, Inc., Inglewood, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Dec. 4, 1961, Ser. No. 156,898 16 Claims. ((31. 222-190) This invention relates to a container for a plurality of ingredients which must be stored separately until shortly prior to the time of use, then adequately intermixed, and finally dispensed for use in filling, potting, sealing, cementing or other purposes. The container of this invention is so constructed that it provides separate compartments for storage of the ingredients and, by adjustment, can then be used as a mixing and a dispensing container.

Many of the most desirable and effective modern day sealants, cements and similar materials are of the cata lytic setting type; that is, they are composed of a base 'material, such as a resin, and a catalyst or accelerator which undergo no change during separate storage but which commence a chemical reaction when mixed, which results in setting up in permanent final form in a relatively short period of time, usually from thirty minutes to two hours. One of the highly desirable features of such materials is that they contain no solvent to dry out and consequently they do not shrink or change form while setting.

In the past, most materials of this type have been stored in separate bags, cans, or other types of containers and poured into some additional larger container, being mixed with a spatula or the like. The mixture must then be poured into a dispenser for use. Such arrangements are clumsy and time consuming and, since the mixing is done in the open air, the operation usually results in the incorporation of many small and large air bubbles in the mixture which is particularly undesirable in the case of asealant.

The difiiculties mentioned above have been largely,

overcome in the mixing cartridge disclosed in the patent application of Ralph J. Cook, Serial No. 828,118, filed July 20, 1959, now abandoned. The device there disclosed includes a shell having a dasher andadiaphragm therein, the latter dividing the shell into storage compartments for two ingredients, with means to dislodge the diaphragm when desired to allow the ingredients to inter-.

mix. An end wall or plug closes one end of the shell and an actuating rod for thedasher extends through and closes the dispensing outlet opening. After the ingred-' ients are mixed, the dasher rod is removed and the shell or cartridge is ordinarily placed in a power operated gun of the type disclosed in the Detrie Patent No. 2,838,210 in order to dispense the contents.

While the device described is eminently satisfactory for its purpose it is rather expensive to make and its use is generally limited to larger sizes such as used in commer cial and industrial work. There is at present a great need and a widespread demand for a very small container which will store the ingredients separately, mix them adequately and be operable manually with self contained means to dispense the contents. -Such a device is pri-1 ingredient is then introduced through end of the shell is closed by a generally cylindrical plug to form a container. For the purpose of dividing the container into two compartments at. opposing ends a gen erally cylindrical or disk-like partition is provided. The partition has sealing contact with the Wall of the container and is formed with a central axial passage. This passage is threaded in part and has a substantially cylindrical sealing seat in part.

A dasher is located in the compartment adjacent the dispensing end and extends across at least the major part of the span of the container. It may contact the wall but preferably is of slightly smaller diameter. A plurality of axially extending holes are formed adjacent the periph cry but any other formation which will accomplish adequate mixing may be substituted. A slender elongate handle extends from the dasher on the longitudinal axis of the container, passes freely through the passage in the partition and has a sliding fit in a bearing hole in the end wall. A centrally located boss on the dasher confronts the partition and has a generally cylindrical or slightly tapered section to sealingly engage the seat in the partition and a threaded section to engage the threaded portion of the partition passage.

When the dasher and partition are screwed firmly together the partition becomes efllectively imperforate and combined members'now serve as a piston or plunger and I the handle is moved forwardly to extrude the mixture through the nozzle.

Several methods of filling thecompartmentsare available. nozzle dipped in the ingredient, and the plunger retracted to. the desired extent. If the ingredient isof low enough viscosity it may be forced in through the nozzle in the;

manner. of a lubricating operation pushing the plunger" back until the desired amount of ingredient is in the compartment. In either event, air is excluded. Afterthe forward compartment is filled, the rear compartment may be filled by pouring, after which the end wall plug is inserted. A small passage is provided in the end wall to allow the escape of air audit is later plugged with a pellet. In some cases the'end wall is inserted first and the second the small passage with a nozzle type instrument.

A slender, elongate, pin-like element is inserted in and v fills the nozzle passage duringistorage to prevent the ac- Y cess of air and during mixingtokeep the nozzle free of the ingredient so that all of the material will be thoroughly; mixed. The end wall seals off air from the other ingredient and moves'axially to a slight extent to breathe? and accommodate the presence of differing amounts of the handle in thejcontainerduring mixing.

1 invention;

Various other advantages and features of novelty will become apparent as the description proceeds in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view, partly in section, illustrating the presently preferred embodiment of the FIGURE 2 is a longitudinal sectional view through a part of the apparatus showing the partition in imperforate sealing condition;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the dasher separatedfrom the partition;

The plunger may be pushed to ,the domed end, the

' the nozzle or dispensing outlet.

of the bore is provided with a thread 40.

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view of the dasher;

FIGURE 5 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 showing the dasher ready to be re-engaged with the partition;

FIGURE 6 is a longitudinal sectional View showing a modified form of dasher and partition; and

FIGURE 7 is a view similar to FIGURE 6 showing anothermoditled form of dasher and partition.

Turning now to FIGURE 1, it will be seen that the device consists generally of a shell ill in the form of a cylinder having a domed end 12, which end is completed by a tapered nozzle 14 having a slender elongate passage 16 which is preferably cylindrical or slightly tapered. The opposite end 18 of the shell is closed by a plug or end wall 20. A pair of opposed ears 22 are provided to serve as finger grips, primarily in the dispensing operation.

' Means 24 are provided to divide the shell or container into two opposed compartments 25 and 27 for storing the ingredients prior to mixing and to serve ultimately as a piston or plunger to extrude the ingredients through Means 24 comprises a partition 26 anda dasher 28, the latter having a slender elongate handle 3i extending rearwardly and terminating in recurved grip section 32. The forward end of the handle has an enlarged flattened end 33 to insure anchorage in the dasher. The shell 19, end wall 24), and partition 26 are made of a suitable plastic material such as polyethylene, while the dasher and handle are preferably metal.

, As can be best seen in FIGURE 2, the partition 26 is, generally cylindrical or disk-like in form and is provided with a plurality of annular labyrinthtype sealing lips 34, which tightly contact the inner wall of the shell to constitutea' seal. The partition is also provided with a central passage or'bore 36. The portion of the bore confronting the dasher is in the form of an annular recess or seat 38 which may be cylindrical or slightly tapered, diverging toward the dasher. The opposite end :The dasher .28. has a domed forward face 42 which substantially matches. the shape of the end of the cylinder. In mixing, this insures that all of the material will intermingle properly. In dispensing, it insures that all of the mixture will be forced out for use except the small amount remaining in the dasher holes 44. The 'size of the dasher itself may vary with the character of the ingredients being mixed. If the ingredients are rela- "Lively/thin it is preferable to leave a clearance between the dasher and the wall for easier reciprocation. Howing the handle and comprising a first portion 48 which is generally annular in shape and may be cylindrical or V converging slightly outwardly, and a second portion 54 bearing a thread which matches thread 40 in the partition. When the partition is in the position of FIGURE 1 intermediate' the ends of the cylinder it must be effectively 'im-perforate to constitute a substantiallyperfect seal between theing'redientsin' compartments 25 and 27. As seen in FIGURE 2, this is accomplished by securing the dasher and partition tightly together. through themedium of the threaded portionsdtl and 50. Part 48 of the boss is forced into part SS in the partition to completely seal the passage 36,.and the sealing lips 34 tightly contactthe wall of the cylinder. During storage this, seal may be 'furtherinsurcd by tightly wrapping the flexible :shelll0 with adhesive tape at the locus of the partition.

When it is desired to mix the two ingredients the handle is actuatedto 'unserew the dasher from the partition to the position shown in FIGURE 3. It will be seen that at this time the plug edits entirely removed from seat 38 to provide a .flow path through the partition.

The handle can now be pulled rearwardly tomove the dasher and partition to the position of FIGURE 5. Since the partition is flexible, threads 4t? have a tendency to snap over threads 5% and decrease the flow path to practically zero. In order to offset such action threaded part 5% is provided with a pair of opposed flats 52 as shown in FlGURE 4. With this construction there is always a flow path through the threads. Obviously threads at, could be mutilated instead or small passages could be formed adjacent to the threads. it will be noted in FIGURE 3 that handle 36' has a substantial clearance in passage 36.

With the parts in the position shown in FIGURE 5, compartments Z5 and 27 have been merged and the dasher may be reciprocated throughout the length of the single compartment to thoroughly the two ingredients. Since the partition has a rather tight fit in the shell it will remain at the rear end out of the Way during the operation. As the length of the handle moves into and out or" the compartment, the volume must change slightly. This is taken care of by the fact that end wall 213 together with the partition, move axially a slight distance. After the mixing completed the dasher is returned to the position of FIGURE 5 and the handle is rotated to re-engage the parts sealingly to constitute a piston or plunger. To prevent any possible rotation of the partition during engagement or disengagement the shell may be gripped externally to immobilize the partition. The handle may now be moved forwardly, forcing the piston down the length of the shell and extruding the contents through the dispensing outlet 16. Bars 22 may be engaged by the operators fingers at this time to assist in moving the handle.

The forward compartment 25 is normally filled first and usually contains the catalyst or accelerator. In one method of filling, the plunger or piston comprising the dasher and partition sealingly engaged is moved fully forward and nozzle id is dipped into a container of the desired ingredient. The plunger is now pulled rearwardly by the handle and the ingredient is drawn in by suction. The operation is stopped when a predetermined amount of ingredient has been deposited in the compartment. In an alternative method, the plunger is moved fully forward and the ingredient is forced into the nozzle by a device substantially identical to a lubricating grease gun. Entrance of the ingredient will of course force the plunger rearwardly, and again the operation is stopped when the desired amount of ingredient has been inserted.

It is desirable to exclude air from the ingredient during storage and to exclude the ingredient from the nozzle passage 16 during mixing so that there will be no unmixed ingredient requiring bleeding off before the proper mixture is dispensed. To take care of this problem a sealing member is provided in the form of a slender elongate rod or pin 54 which is a press or push fit in passage 16 and is just long enough to completely fill the passage. The rod or pin is united at its forward end to a conical cap 56 which fits snugly over nozzle E4. The nozzle is provided with a head 58 and the cap has a cooperating annular groove or recess 6 9 to yieldingly retain the cap in place. The cap and sealing element are of course removed for dispensing.

The proper amount of base material may be poured into compartment 27 and plug 2d then inserted in end 13 of the shell to a point eliminating any air space above the material. Since the plug or end wall 239 has sealing contact with the rod and the shell Wall, means are provided to allow escape of air during insertion. The means take the form of an axially directed passage 62 through the end wall. The passage may be non-circular as shown for a purpose to be described or it may be cylindrical. In either event a spherical enlargement d4 is formed intermediate the ends and serves as a for the sealing member as which may be a pellet of metal or plastic.

sea

Another method of filling is to insert the end wall in place and then insert a filling nozzle in passage 62, forcing material in until the compartment is full. A cylindrical or conical nozzle is used, providing air spaces between itself and the corners of the non-circular passage. Filling is continued until all of the air has exited and the material appears at the outlet of the passage. The nozzle is now removed and seal 66 is inserted.

It will be seen that the present invention provides a novel self contained device which initially stores ingredien-ts completely separately as long as desired, and which can then be adjusted to serve as a practical mixing device without opening it or in any way exposing the contents to air which would undesirably mix with the contents. By another adjustment and still without opening it except for removal of the nozzle cap, it becomes a practical dispenser.

The specific construction of the dasher and partition may be modified as shown in FIGURE 6 where the dasher 128 is provided with a recess 148 and a threaded bore 150. The partition 126 has a boss or protuberance 138 and a threaded extension 146. The partition has an axially extending opening 136 substantially larger than the handle 130 and the extension is pierced by a'plurality of generally radially extending holes 141 to form flow paths. 143 seats in recess 138, thus sealing off holes or ports 141 and making the partition substantially imperforate. When they are readjusted to the position shown, the partition may be moved to the end of shell and mixing may proceed as previously described.

Another modification is illustrated in FIGURE 7 where dasher 228 is provided with an annular bead 248 on its confronting face and also bears a centrally located boss 25% surrounding handle 239 and bearing mutilated threads 251 of the type shown in FIGURE 4 at St and 52. The partition 226- has a bore 23a substantially larger than handle 23% and threaded at 240 to engage with threaded boss 25%. With the parts as shown the partition is completely sealed by engagement of the annular bead 248 with the planar face 227 of the partition. When the parts are separated by rotation of the handle, the material will flow between the threaded portions and between the separated faces of the dasher and partition and they may now be moved to the rearward end of the shell. The mixing and dispensing operations are as previously described.

Various changes and modifications may be made in the specific construction of parts of the invention as disclosed herein without departing from the spirit of the invention and it is intended that all such changes and modifications shall be embraced with the scope of the following claims.

I claim: V

l. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing them, and later dispensing the mixture, comprising: an elongate cylindrical shell to contain the two ingredients and having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends;

When the parts are tightly secured together boss g and having a central axially extending flow passagetherev and end wall closing the other end of the shell and.

cooperating with the shell to form a container; a partition extending generally diametrically. across the entire span of said shell at an intermedite point in the length of the latter to divide it into two compartments at opposing ends of said shell to store said two ingredients separately;

-end; anda central boss on' said dasher surrounding said handle and confronting said partition; said boss having an annular portion to engage the annular portion of said bore to completely seal said partition and having a threaded portion to engage the threaded portion of said bore to secure said partition and said dasher together in sealing relation for storage purposes.

2. A construction as claimed in claim 1, said dasher being rotatable to unseat the annular part of said boss from the annular part of the bore in said partition, said dasher further being axially movable toward said end wall to urge said partition to an inoperative position adjacent to said end wall.

3. A construction as claimed in claim 2 in which one of the sets of threads is mutilated to provide a flow path for one of said ingredients through said partition to permit it to be moved to said inoperative position.

4. A construction as claimed in claim 1, the wall of said shell being flexible whereby it may be gripped externally to immobilize said partition while the dasher is being manipulated to engage and disengage the partition.

5. A construction as claimed in claim 2, said dasher being reengageable in sealing relation with said partition adjacent the end wall after the mixing operation; said handle being operable to force said joined partition and dasher toward said outlet to extrude the mixed ingredients extending generally diametrically across the entire span of said shell at an intermediate point in the length of the latter to divide it into two compartments at opposing v ends of said shell to store said two ingredients separately;

said partition having a sealing edge in contact with the.

cylindrical inner wall of said shell around its periphery through; a dasher extending across at least a major porof the span of'said shell and having an elongate handle passing freely through the flow passage in the partition and extending slidably through said end wall; said passage being enough larger than said'handle to allow free flow of ingredients from one side of said partition to the other; and a central boss on said dasher surrounding said handle and confronting said partition and being of a said end wall and leave said partition in inoperative position adjacent to said end wall; whereby substantially the entire interior'of said shell is converted into a single compartment containing both of said ingredients and said dasher may be reciprocated throughout the length thereof to mix the contents.

7. A construction as claimed in claim 6, said dispensing outlet being in the form of an elongate nozzle having an axial passage therethrough; and a removable sealing element extending through said passage to exclude air from the ingredient adjacent to the nozzle during storage and to exclude the'ingredient from the passage during mixing.

8. A construction as claimed in claim 6, said end wall being axially movable to accommodate changes in volume resulting from the presence of varying lengths of said handle in the mixing compartment during the mixing operation.

9. A construction as claimed in claim 6, said end wall being axially movable into the end of said shell to close same after filling; an opening through said wall to permit escapeof air during insertion; and a plug to close said opening and exclude air from the adjacent ingredient during storage.

. mixing.

10. A construction as claimed in claim 9, said end Wall opening being enlarged intermediate its ends and said plug being in the form of a substantially spherical pellet sized to be seated securely in the enlarged portion of said opening.

11. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing them, and later dispensing the mixture, comprising: an elongate cylindrical shell to'contain the two ingredients and having a normally closed dispensing outlet at one of its ends; an end Wall closing the other end of the shell and cooperating with the sheil to form a container; a partition extending generally diametrically across the entire span of said shell at an intermediate'point in the length of the latterto divide it into two compartments at opposing ends of said shell to store said two ingredients separately; said partition having a sealing edge in contact with the cylindrical inner Wall-of said shell around its periphery and having a central axially extending flow passage therethrough; a dasher extending across at least a major portion of the span of said shell and having an elongate handle passing freely through the flow passage in the partition and extendingslidably through said end wall; said passage being enough larger than said handle to allow free flow of ingredients from one side of said partition to the other; interengaging means on said partition and said dasher to seal the flow passage in said partition and make it eliectively imperforate; and means operable by movement of said handle to engage the dasher tightly with the partition and to urge said sealing means into interengagemerit to seal said compartments from each other for storage purposes and operable by opposite movement of said handle to disengage said dasher and partition and said sealing means to permit flow through the flow passage in said partition; said handle being movable axially when said parts are disengaged to move said dasher and partition toward said end wall to store said partition adjacent thereto and convertsub-stantially the entire interior of said shell into a single compartment for mixing of said ingredients bysaid dasher; said dasher being sealingly're-engageable with said partition adjacent said end wall to subsequently serve as a piston for extruding the mixed.ingredients through said dispensing outlet.

12. A construction as claimed in claim ll, said interengaging sealingmeans comprising a protuberance and from the ingredient adjacent to the nozzle during storage and to exclude the ingredient from the passage during 14; A construction as claimed in claim ll, said means operable by movement of the handle to engage the dasher With the partition comprising threaded portions on said dasher and partition.

15. A construction as claimed in claim ll, said end wall having a non-circular opening formed therethrough to receive a filling instrument having an external surface of circular cross-sectional shape; and a plug to seal said opening for storage purposes.

16. A dual compartment container for separately storing two ingredients, subsequently intermixing them, and later dispensing the mixture, comprising: an elongate cylindrical shell to contain the two ingredients and having a scalable dispensing outlet at one of its ends; and end Wall closing the other end or" the shell and cooperating with the shell to form a container; a partition extending across the span of said shell at an intermediate point in the length of the latter to divide it into two compartments at opposing ends of said shell to store said two ingredients separately; said partition having an annular margin in slidable sealing contact with the cylindrical inner wall of said shell; a flow passage extending through said partition from one of said compartments to the other for free flow of either of said ingredients therethrough; a dasher extending laterally of said shell between said partition and said dispensing outlet and having an elongate handle passing through said partition and said end Wall; interengaging means on said partition and said dasher to seal the flow passage in said partition to make it effectively imperforate and prevent mixing of said ingredients until desired; said dasher handle being movable to make and break said sealing interengagement; said handle being movable axially when said parts are disengaged to move said dasher rearwardly toward said end wall; said dasher pushing said partition toward said end wall to convert substantially the entire interior of said shell into a single compartment for mixing of said ingredients by repeated axial movements of said dasher; and said dasher being sealingly re-engageahle With said partition adjacent said end Wall to subsequently cooperate therewith as a piston for extruding the mixed ingredients through said dispensing outlet.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,166,437 Howie July 18, 1939 2,841,145 Eppe July l, 1958 2,954,144 Elam Sept. 27, 1960 3,028,052 Archer Apr. 3, 1962 3,140,078 Krahe et al July 7, 1964 FOREIGN PATENTS 32,420 Denmark Oct. 22, 1923 460,039 France Nov. 21, 1913 933,444 France Apr. 20, 1948 370,788 Germany Mar. 7, I923

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/190, 222/136, 222/386, 366/333, 604/92, 604/89, 222/546
International ClassificationA61M5/315, B01F15/00, B01F13/00, B01F15/02, A61M5/28, B01F11/00, A61M3/00, B05C17/01, B05C17/005
Cooperative ClassificationB05C17/00559, B05C17/0052, B01F15/00506, B05C17/00553, B01F15/0205, B01F11/0082, A61M5/284, A61M3/005, A61M5/31596, B05C17/00579, B01F13/0023, B01F13/002, B01F15/0223, B01F15/0215, B01F15/0213, B05C17/01
European ClassificationB01F13/00K2B, B01F15/02B20B, B01F15/02B6P, B01F13/00K2B4, B01F15/02B6R, B05C17/005P2, B05C17/005F4, A61M5/28M, B05C17/005F, B01F11/00N2, A61M5/315M, A61M3/00M, B01F15/02B6, B05C17/005C