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Publication numberUS3165220 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 12, 1965
Filing dateJan 22, 1962
Priority dateJan 22, 1962
Publication numberUS 3165220 A, US 3165220A, US-A-3165220, US3165220 A, US3165220A
InventorsHaynes Don A
Original AssigneeHaynes Don A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tamper-proof container
US 3165220 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 12, 1965 D. A. HAYNES 3,165,220

TAMPER-PROOF CONTAINER Filed Jan. 22, 1962 3 Sheets-Sheet l INV EN TOR.

Don A. Haynes D. A. HAYNES TAMPER- Jan. 12, 1965 PROOF CONTAINER 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jail. 22, 1962 Fly. 6

INVENTOR. Don A. Haynes Jan. 12, 1965 D. A. HAYNES 3,165,220

TAMPER-FROOF CONTAINER Filed Jan. 22, 1962 5* Sheets-Sheet 3 INV EN TOR.

Fla. /2 Don A. Haynes United States Patent 3,165,220 TAMFER-PROOEF CGNTAINER Don A. Haynes, 1989 Osage Drive, @lremos, Mich.

' Filed Jan. 22, 1962, Ser. No. 167,581

2 laims. (Cl. 215-42) This invention relates to tamper-proof containers, such as bottles, cans and the like, and more particularly to those in which the closures can be pushed onto the containers, but which can be removed only by unscrewing them and replaced again by screwing the closures onto the containers.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a simple and inexpensive screw-on, screw-oft type of container closure having means for indicating whether, when once originally filled and sealed, the container has been opened.

A further object of the invention is to provide such a container closure which can be placed on the container by an axial movement when originally filled, thereby decreasing the expense involved in capping the container.

These objects are attained by providing the closure with a unique type of thread and a relatively flexible closure having lugs thereon co-operating with the threads to provide a screw-on, screw off connection, and a frangible means to prevent removal of the closure until said means is broken.

In the drawings accompanying this specification:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a container and closure embodying the invention;

FIG. 2 is a top plan view thereof;

FIG. 3 is a bottom View of the closure;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken on substantially line 44 of FIG. 2 with the closure partially on the container;

FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing the container on the closure;

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary elevational View of the invention showing the closure partially on the container;

FIG. 7 is a view similar to FIG. 6 showing the closure on the container;

FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view taken on substantially line 88 of FIG. 1 showing the cap partially on the container;

FIG. 9 is a fragmentary cross-sectional View taken on substantially the line 9-9 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 10 is a fragmentary side elevational view of a modified form of the invention;

FIG. 11 is a top plan view thereof;

FIG. 12 is a bottom view of the closure;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the container and closure on a larger scale than FIG. 10, and showing the principal parts in broken lines; and

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the modified form with the closure partially removed.

Referring now to the drawing in more detail, and particularly to FIGS. 1 to 9 which show one form of the invention, a container in the form of a glass or plastic bottle 10 is closed by a closure 12.

The container 10 has an opening therein surrounded by an annular wall or neck 14 on the outside of which are threads 16. Preferably there are three threads, all alike and shaped as shown in FIGS. 4 and 5. Between the threads, grooves 18 are formed for a purpose which will appear presently. It will be noted that the under side of each thread 16 has a helical portion 20 which terminates in a flat portion 22. Just above this flat portion 22 the thread has a relatively abrupt shoulder 24 inclined as shown. Each thread terminates at 26 opposite the shoulder 24 of the adjoining thread to form an entrance opening to the groove 13 for a purpose which will appear later.

ice

Also formed integral with the neck of the container and extending radially outwardly therefrom are one or more buttons or pins 28. These buttons are in the form of truncated cones as shown in FIG. 9, and have relatively easily breakable connections 30 with the neck of the container. The purpose of these will appear later.

The cap or closure 12 is a cup-shaped member having an annular wall 32 surrounding the neck of the container. Adjacent the lower edge of the wall 32 are lugs 34 equal in number to the threads 16 and spaced circumferentially so that they will all enter grooves 18 between the terminals 26 and shoulders 24 on the threads simultaneously. The lugs 34 are similar to wedge-shaped latches in side elevation, as shown in FIGS. 4 and S particularly.

The closure is also notched at 36 to receive the buttons 28, the notches being spaced so that they will receive the button or buttons when lugs 34 are positioned a the entrances to the grooves 18.

The closure 12 is formed of a slightly deformable and stretchable material so that the closure can be forced axially onto the neck of the container with the lugs 34 passing over the threads 16 and snapping back into place.

After the container is originally filled with the intended contents, the closure is attached thereto by locating the lugs 34 in the entrance openings in the grooves 18 and pushing the closure axially onto the neck of the container. As mentioned previously, when the lugs 34 are positioned so that they will enter the grooves 18 one of the notches 36 will be in a position to receive the button 28 and slide over the same. As axial pressure is exerted on the closure in a direction toward the container, the lugs 34 will strike those portions 17 of the threads directly under the gaps between the ends 26 of the threads and the adjacent shoulders 24 thereon and will be forced radially outwardly, thereby stretching the annular side wall of the closure and deforming the same, as shown in an exaggerated manner in FIG. 8. When the lugs 34 have passed over the portions 17 of the threads 16, the lugs 34 snap under the fiat horizontal portions 22 of the threads and the side wall 32 of the closure resumes its normal circular shape.

It must be noted that the flat portions 22 of the threads I6 are spaced from the open end of the neck 14, and the lugs 34 are so located on the closure 12 that when the lugs 34 snap over the threads 16 and engage the flat portions 22 of the threads, the seal 38 is compressed sufiiciently to produce a tight seal between the closure and the container. Also, the seal 38 has a tendency to separate the closure and the container, thus maintaining such seal.

It will be seen that because of the shape of the lugs 34, the latter cannot be pulled from the container without the exercise of considerable force. However, the closure can be unscrewed from the container quite easily, just as with a conventional screw thread. In order to unscrew the closure, howexer, it is necessary to break the button 28 from the container. This is easily done because of its weak connection with the container. Once the button 2% has been broken and discarded, the closure can always be replaced, and again removed, just as all screw threaded closures are. When the button 28 has been broken, however, the lack thereof indicates that the original seal has been broken.

FIGS. 10 to 14 illustrate a modified form of the invention wherein the frangible, tamper-proof seal is a part of the closure instead of a part of the container.

In this form of the invention a container 50 is provided with a closure 52. The container is in all respects the same as the one previously described except that one or more notches 51 are formed in the wall of the container. These will be more fully explained presently. The container 50 has an opening therein surrounded by a neck 54, the neck having threads 56 thereon. The threads have Ll shoulders 64 and terminate at despaced from the adjacent shoulder. The under sides of the threads 56 have flat portions 62 just as the threads previously described.

The closure 52 is a cup-shaped member having lugs 74 thereon shaped the same as lugs 34 previously described, which co-operate with threads 56 to hold the closure on the container and permit the closure to be screwed onto the container and unscrewed therefrom, as well as to be pressed thereon when originally filled and capped. The closure 52 has, however, an additional skirt portion 53 depending below the lugs 74.

The junction of the skirt portion 53 and the closure proper is severely weakened by being reduced in crosssection at 55. This may be accomplished by being thinned as shown, by the formation of slots 57 therein, or both.

At the lower edge of the skirt lugs 59' are formed, which lugs depend from the skirt as shown, and when the closure is in place, are received in the notches 51 in the container 50. Theinot'ches 51 and lugs 59 are so positioned that the latter will enter the former when lugs 74 are received in the entrances to grooves 58, etween terminals 66 and shoulders 64 'on the threads.

The closure 52 is provided with a sealing gasket 78 similar to the seal 38 previously described.

The closure disclosed in this form of the invention is initially placed on the container in the same manner as in the form previously described, that is, by locating lugs '74 in the entrances to grooves 58 and pushing the closure down until the lugs '74- snap under the threads 56' and engage the flat portions 62 to hold the closure on the container.

When it is desired to remove the closure it is simply unscrewed as in any screw-type closure. When that is done, the lugs 59are forced to remain in notches 51, so that the skirt 53 is held against movement. The weakened portion of the closure is then easily broken so that the upper portion of the closure can be removed, and reinstalled in a normal manner. The skirt portion having fulfilled its usefulness can be removed.

From the foregoing it will be seen that this invention provides a very simple, inexpensive, tamper-proof'sealing device for containers. The closure can be very easily assembled on the container with only a single pushing operation. Once assembled it becomes a simple screw-on, screw-off closure, yet indicates clearly that the closure has been removed, if such has been the case.

I claim: V V

1. In combination, a container having a body portion with an opening therein defined by an annular wall, a

nular closure wall having a plurality of circumferentially spaced radially inwardly extending lugs engaging said threads,-said threads having substantially flat circumferentially extending lower surfaces spaced equally with said lugs, the free ends of'said threads being shaped to .re-

, spective fiat surfaces. upon an axial movement: of said closure toward said container, said lugs being shaped to prevent removal of said closure in an axial direction relative to said container and to hold said closure in; tight sealing engagement with said container, said closure being removable from said container by rotary movement of 7 said closure relative to said container, and being replaceable thereon by an opposite rotary movement, and a.

button extending radially outwardly from said container wall, and said closure wall having arecess therein receiving said button when said closure is first assembled onto cup-shaped push-on, screw-off closure having an annular' wall in coaxial relation with said container wall, said'container wall having spaced apart threads thereon, said annular closure wall having a plurality of circumferentially spaced radially inwardly extending lugs engaging said threads, said threads having substantially flat circumferen tially extending lower surfaces spaced equally with said lugs, the free ends of said threads being shaped to receive and guide said lugs to positions beneath their respective flat surfaces upon an axial movement of said closure toward said container, said lugs being shaped to prevent removal of said closure in an axial direction relative to said container and to hold said closure in tight sealing engagement with said container, said closure being removablefromsaid container by rotary movement of said closure relative to said container,

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,863,796 "Jackson et al. June 21, 1932 2,043,226 Beider et al June 9, 1936 2,133,490 Swannell Oct. 18, 1938 2,169,686 Fabrice Aug. 15,1939 2,752,660v Martin a June 26, 1956 3,072,276

Nichols Jan. 8, 1 963

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1863796 *Mar 26, 1930Jun 21, 1932David Jackson HerbertClosure for bottles, jars, and other containers
US2043226 *Nov 22, 1934Jun 9, 1936Warren H BeiderSealing device for bottles
US2133490 *Jun 5, 1934Oct 18, 1938Viscose Dev Company LtdCap or stopper for bottles or like containers
US2169686 *Mar 31, 1937Aug 15, 1939Guardian Safety Seal CompanySealed receptacle
US2752060 *Feb 16, 1955Jun 26, 1956Martin Warren NContainer closure
US3072276 *Apr 21, 1960Jan 8, 1963Celluplastics IncSpring member for tamper proof vial
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3425026 *Apr 5, 1967Jan 28, 1969Int Standard Electric CorpElectrical connector assembly
US4781311 *May 28, 1987Nov 1, 1988The Clorox CompanyAngular positioned trigger sprayer with selective snap-screw container connection
US4844250 *Dec 15, 1988Jul 4, 1989Wheeling Stamping CompanyTamper-evident container assembly
US5320233 *Aug 30, 1993Jun 14, 1994Aluminum Company Of AmericaTamper evident lug cap
US6032814 *Mar 9, 1999Mar 7, 2000Continental Sprayers International, Inc.Container assembly with improved container connection
US6155462 *May 4, 1999Dec 5, 2000Owens-Illinois Closure Inc.Bayonet-type finish for a container
US7121405 *Nov 22, 2002Oct 17, 2006Taiyo Yuden Co., Ltd.Disc package
US7198170Jan 7, 2004Apr 3, 2007Berry Plastics CorporationClosure and container system and method for sealing a closure on a container
US7972349 *Aug 2, 2004Jul 5, 2011Owen Mumford LimitedBlood sampling devices
US8141793Jul 14, 2009Mar 27, 2012The Dial CorporationGel air freshener and method of unsealing such gel air freshener
US9044768 *Oct 30, 2013Jun 2, 2015Aptar France SasFluid dispenser
US20040099548 *Nov 22, 2002May 27, 2004Taiyo Yuden Co., Ltd.Disc package
US20050145629 *Jan 7, 2004Jul 7, 2005Entire Interest.Closure and container system and method for sealing a closure on a container
US20060129172 *Aug 2, 2004Jun 15, 2006Crossman David DBlood sampling devices
US20060272965 *Jul 21, 2006Dec 7, 2006Taiyo Yuden Co., Ltd.Disc package
US20090057260 *Aug 27, 2007Mar 5, 2009Sunil MohindraTamper-Evident Container
US20110011947 *Jul 14, 2009Jan 20, 2011The Dial CorporationGel air freshener and method of unsealing such gel air freshener
US20140124538 *Oct 30, 2013May 8, 2014Aptar France SasFluid dispenser
DE19639124A1 *Sep 24, 1996Apr 2, 1998Kunststoffwerk Kutterer GmbhTube cap unit
DE102010000743A1 *Jan 8, 2010Jul 14, 2011Hamilton Bonaduz AgSample container i.e. culture container, for holding e.g. biological cell culture to breed cell in research laboratory, has locking parts brought from locking position into other locking position, in which cover part is latched at base part
EP0831031A2 *Jul 24, 1997Mar 25, 1998Kunststoffwerk Kutterer GmbH & Co. KGTube closure
EP2039435A2 *May 30, 2007Mar 25, 2009Guala Dispensing S.R.L.Closing system for a container, for example for trigger dispenser
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/252, 215/318
International ClassificationB65D41/34
Cooperative ClassificationB65D41/3409, B65D41/3404, B65D41/34
European ClassificationB65D41/34A1, B65D41/34, B65D41/34A