Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3165760 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 19, 1965
Filing dateMay 8, 1961
Priority dateMay 8, 1961
Publication numberUS 3165760 A, US 3165760A, US-A-3165760, US3165760 A, US3165760A
InventorsAbajian Aram Christian
Original AssigneeAbajian Aram Christian
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Infant's crib
US 3165760 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. C. ABAJIAN Jan. 19, 1965 INFANT S CRIB Filed May 8, 1961 H IS AT TORNEYS United States Patet 3,165,760 HNFANTS CRlB Aram flhristian Ahajian, 135 E. 71st St, New Yorh, N.Y. Filed Miayfi, 196i, er. No. 1%,443 1t) Qlaims. (til. -97) This invention relates to a crib and more particularly to an infants crib that can be readily disassembled.

Some of the disadvantages of conventional infants cribs include excessive weight and size, lack of ease in assembling, lack of rigidity and durability (in the case of takeapart cribs), and non-adaptability to use in automobiles. Furthermore, difficulties have been experienced with permanent rigid cribs from the infant injuring itself by falling against the rigid sides and ends of the crib.

Accordingly, it is an object of this invention to pr0- vide an infants crib which is durable, safe, light in weight and easy to assemble and disassemble.

It is another object of the invention to provide a crib which will protect the infant from insects, animals, windblown leaves, and other blown or falling objects.

Another object of the invention is to provide a crib which is adjustable in height, has the ability to support the infants weight on the top thereof and is adapted for use in automobiles and other vehicles.

Another object is to effect an improvement whereby the infant is protected from possible injury by falling against the corner posts and other rigid members of the crib.

Still another object is to provide an infants crib which can be disassembled into a compact, easily portable device.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention are accomplished by providing a structure having a rectangular frame composed of horizontal and vertical tubular members, a fabric net portion which includes partial tubular flexible members attached to the net and adapted to clip onto the four horizontal end members of the frame, and sleeves adapted to receive the horizontal longitudinal members of the frame. The clip-on members serve to lock the end assemblies of the frame to the remainder of the structure. In addition, the clip-on members produce desired tension in the top and bottom panels so as to impart rigidity and strength to the assembled structure and at the same time keep the netting removed from the frame as much as possible.

Strips of nylon fabric tape are preferably distributed in an overlapping diagonal crosswise arrangement on the side, end and bottom panels of the netting. The tension produced by the clip-on members is largely carried by the strips. This feature still further increases the strength and rigidity of the frame and the netting, thereby protecting the child as described above.

For further comprehension of the invention and of the advantages thereof, reference will be made to the following description and accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the crib and netting in the assembled position;

FIG. 2 is a view of a section taken on a plane represented by the lines 2-2 of FIG. land looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 3 is a view of a section taken on a plane represented by the lines 33 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

ice

FIG. 4 is a view of a section taken on a plane represented by the lines 4-4 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view of one of the longitudinal tubular membersforming aside portion of the frame;

FIG. 6 is a view of a section taken on a plane represented by the lines 6-6 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIG. 7 is an exploded view of a lower corner of the frame; and i PEG. 8 is a view from the inside of the crib showing the stitched overlapping arrangement of the crosswise nylon tape; and i FIG. 9 is a view of a modified flexible sleeve arrang ment in accordance with the present invention taken on a plane represented by the lines 9 of FIG. 1 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawings in detail, FIG. 1 shows the rectangular frame of the crib having four vertical adjustable corner posts 11 made of aluminum tubing, four tubular aluminum supports forming the horizontal end sections 12 of the frame and four aluminum tubular members forming the longitudinal side sections 13 of the frame, said sections being inter-connected by means of four plastic fittings Ma at the upper corners and four plastic fittings 14b at the lower corners.

As shown more particularly in FIG. 7, the vertical tubular corner posts 11 each comprise an upper section 11:: and a lower section 1117, the latter being of a smaller diameter so as to telescope within the upper section. The upper section 11a has evenly spaced holes 15 on both sides thereof, while the lower section 1115 has a springactuated button 16 adapted to engage the holes and thus provide for the adjustable legs. The bottoms of the corner posts ll are fitted with tips 17 made: from a plastic material or other suitable substitute. Each longitudinal side support 13 is a two-piece structure wherein one of the pieces 18 has a tubular plastic fitting: 19 at one end thereof which is received within an end 26' of the other of the two sections. The structure of the longitudinal supports is shown clearly in FIG. 5.

The netting portion 21 of the crib is of a rectangular box-like shape when in use. The netting is formed of a strong resilient fabric material such as nylon, is stitched with strong nylon thread, and has a zippered top 22 as shown in FIG. 1. Fastened to the longitudinal side portions of the netting are flexible sleeves 23 made of a strong fabric material such as canvas through which are inserted the longitudinal side supports 13 of the frame as shown in FIG. 9. An alternative embodiment is shown in FIG. 2 wherein the sleeves 23 are sewn or otherwise attached to the netting at a single point such as by the use of a single seam or grommet. These sleeves are somewhat larger than the diameter of the tubular longitudinal members of the frame to allow the tubing to be inserted quickly and easily in the sleeve. To the four ends of the box-like netting are attached partial tubular flexible plastic members 24 which clip onto the horizontal end members 12 of the frame as clearly shown in FIGURES 3 and 4. Strips of flexible nylon tape 25 are stitched in an overlapping crosswise arrangement on the side, end and bottom portions of the netting as shown clearly in FIG. 8.

The spring-actuated button 16 which provides the adjustable'leg feature is depicted in detail in FIG. 6. The spring portion of the button is secured to the inner wall of the corner post 11b at its uppermost end. The button rides within a bearing ring 26 which surrounds the corner post 1112 at its uppermost end and eliminates binding or squeaking. The bearing ring is preferably made of plastic although other suitable materials may be utilized.

This combination of frame and netting provides a strong, durable stressed skin construction in which the fabric is suspended away from the frame to diminish the chance of injury caused by the child hitting the frame of the crib. The partial tubular plastic members of the netting snap over the horizontal end supports of the frame thereby producing tension particularly in the top and bottom of the netting. This provides a strengthened crib by virtue of the stressed skin contruction. The stressed construction also helps to hold the tubular members of the frame together with their co-operating corner members. Indeed, the top portion of the netting is strong enough to support an infants weight and can be used as a bathinette.

The crosswise arrangement of nylon tape sewn in overlapping sections provides greater rigidity in the side, end and bottom panels of the netting. The nylon fabric tape, being sewed to the netting throughout its entire length, allows the assembly to function in a manner similar to a suspension bridge where a force applied to one point of the structure is evenly distributed throughout the assembly. When the zippered top is closed, it too will become tensioned due to the unique structure of the crib. This uniform stress distribution is aided by the construction of the flexible sleeves 23 since the inside dimensions of the sleeves are sufficient to allow movement of the netting in a direction which permits distribution of stresses from one panel to another.

we ave Thus, it can be seen that the netting not only prevents the frame of the crib from coming apart, but also imparts to the frame rigidity and the ability to withstand internal and external stresses.

In another embodiment of this invention, there is provided a novel mattress 27 comprising a double thickness of quilted plastic material covering relilient Tufflex padding and supported by sixteen locked-in white pine slats 28 taped together in parallel arrangement by a strong adhesive tape 29 at each end of each slat so as to space the slats about one-half inch apart. Each slat can move independently while .at the same time a load on one slate will be distributed to the other slats as well as to the entire crib. The mattress thus supplements the over-all concept of distributing stresses throughout the entire assembly of the crib while simultaneously providing resiliency, shock-absorption and a certain rigidity to safeguard the body of the infant.

As an additional feature of this invention to emphasize the compactness and portability of the crib, the frame and net may be disassembled and stored in a compact carrying case having a shoulder strap and measuring, in one embodiment, 24 in length and 9" in diameter.

From the foregoing, the construction and operation of the device will be readily understood. Since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction shown and described and ac cordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to. For example, instead of using rust-proof anodized aluminum for the frame, light-weight steel tubing could be substituted. Also, the netting portion may be made of any suitable material and in various sizes.

I claim i 1. A crib comprising in combination:

(l) a rectangular take-apart frame including:

(a) four vertically disposed corner post members,

(b) two upper and two lower longitudinal members forming the sides of the crib,

(0) two upper and two lower lateral members forming the ends of the crib, the longitudinal and lateral members being connected to the vertical corner posts thereby forming a parallelepipedon, and

(2) a one-piece body portion of flexible sheet material completely covering said frame and having six rectangular panels forming the sides, ends, top and bottom panels of the crib, the combination of frame and body portion providing when assembled a strong, durable stressed skin construction in which each of the six rectangular panels of the body portion is under tension thereby holding the fname together under compression and imparting rigidity and strength to the crib.

2. The crib recited inclaim 1, wherein at least the side and end panels of the sheet material have diagonally arranged means for reinforcing said frame.

3. The crib as recited in claim 2, wherein the diagonally arranged means comprises strips of flexible material dis tributed in an overlapping arrangement on said panels.

4. A crib comprising in combination when assembled:

(1) a rectangular take-apant frame composed of:

(a) four vertically disposed tubular corner post members,

([2) two upper and two lower longitudinal tubular members forming the sides of the crib,

(0) two upper and two lower lateral tubular members forming the ends of [the crib, the longitudinal and lateral members being connected to the vertical corner posts thereby forming a parallelepipedon, and

(2) a one-piece fabric net portion completely covering the frame and having:

(a) six rectangular panels forming the sides, ends,

top and bottom panels of the crib,

(b) partial tubular flexible members clipped onto the lateral end members of the frame,

(c) sleeves receiving the longitudinal side members of the frame, the combination of frame and fabric net portion providing when assembled a strong, durable stressed skin construction in which each of the six rectangular panels of the fabric net portion is under tension thereby holding the frame together under compression and imparting rigidity and strength to the crib.

5. The crib recited in claim 4, wherein at least the side and end panels of the net have diagonally arranged means for reinforcing said frame.

6. The crib recited in claim 4, including plastic corner fittings adapted to interlock the tubular members.

7. The crib as recited in claim 4 also including a mattress composed of a double thickness of quilted plastic which covers resilient padding material and is supported by locked-in White pin slats taped together in a parallel arrangement by a strong adhesive tape at each end of the individual slats so as to provide a space of about one-half inch between each slat.

8. In a crib comprising when assembled, a net portion and a rectangular take-apart frame having four vertically disposed corner post members, two upper and two lower longitudinal members forming the sides of the frame and two upper and two lower lateral members forming the ends of the crib wherein the longitudinal and lateral members are connected to the vertical corner posts forming a parallelepipedon, the improvement comprising a one-piece fabric net portion, including:

I v (a) partial tubular flexible members clipped onto the lateral end members of the frame,

(1)) sleeves receiving the longitudinal side members of the frame,

5 6 (c) six rectangular panels forming the sides, ends, top arranged means comprises strips of reinforcing material and bottom panels of the crib, and distributed in an overlapping crosswise arrangement also (d) a zippered top, the combination of frame and on the bottom panel of the net.

body portion providing when assembled a strong,

durable stressed skin construction in which each of 5 References Clted m the file of thls patent the six rectangular panels of the fabric net portion UNITED STATES PATENTS is under tension thereby holding the frame toge her 724,316 Morris et a1. Mar. 31, 1903 under compression and imparting rigidity and 2,586,247 Mover Feb. 19, 1952 strength to the crib. 7 2,601,111 Foster June 17, 1952 9. The crib of claim 8 wherein at least the side and 10 2,616,100 Weiner Nov. 4, 1952 end panels of the net portion have diagonally arranged means for reinforcing said structure. FOREIFHTI PATENTS 10. The structure of claim 9 wherein the diagonally 7 03 Great Brltaln Jan. 16, 1946 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No. 3 ,1 65 760 January 19, 1965 Aram Christian Abajian It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patt requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as rrec'ted below.

I I Column 3, line 47, for "relilient" read resilient lu mn 4, line 59, for "pin" read pine Signed and sealed this 1st day of June 1965.,

EDWARD J. BRENNER Commissioner of Patents IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiIiIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiiINiIiIIIIIIIiIIIiuIIIIII\IIWWWWW

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US724316 *Feb 6, 1902Mar 31, 1903William Mck MorrisCanvas coal-bag.
US2586247 *Aug 17, 1950Feb 19, 1952Bunny Bear IncPortable infant's crib
US2601111 *Dec 23, 1948Jun 17, 1952Foster Alfred EdwardFoldable cot for infants
US2616100 *May 8, 1947Nov 4, 1952Weiner LeeSupplementary support for mattresses
GB574703A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3316565 *Apr 9, 1965May 2, 1967Samuel O BroydeCarrier for living beings
US3631548 *Mar 9, 1970Jan 4, 1972Disposit Products IncCombined folding child{40 s crib and playpen
US3924280 *Jun 7, 1974Dec 9, 1975Vincent VaianoPortable play pen
US4070716 *Jul 19, 1976Jan 31, 1978Henry SattFoldable playpen
US4202065 *Jan 13, 1978May 13, 1980Sullivan Barry JCollapsible baby enclosure
US4538309 *Nov 14, 1983Sep 3, 1985Portable Technology, Inc.Portable playpen
US4641387 *Feb 6, 1986Feb 10, 1987St. Vincent Medical CenterBed enclosure
US4739527 *Jul 8, 1986Apr 26, 1988Sassy, Inc.Portable foldable playpen
US4811437 *Jun 26, 1987Mar 14, 1989Graco Metal Products, Inc.Foldable playyard
US4873733 *May 5, 1988Oct 17, 1989Wang Ted T HToy bed
US4899496 *Oct 29, 1987Feb 13, 1990Chew Ii Bonnie GPortable child enclosure
US4921369 *Sep 12, 1988May 1, 1990Chew Ii Bonnie GConnector for portable furniture including a bed and a child enclosure
US5099866 *Apr 24, 1989Mar 31, 1992Solis Clorinda AProtective play enclosure
US5279006 *Aug 28, 1992Jan 18, 1994Teng Jerry M SPlay yards for infants
US5363521 *Dec 30, 1992Nov 15, 1994Fisher-Price, Inc.Collapsible playpen
US5394574 *Dec 27, 1993Mar 7, 1995Chuang; JamesFoldable bed for infants
US5544372 *Nov 14, 1994Aug 13, 1996Fisher-Price, Inc.Ball and socket joint, useful with collapsible playpens
US5553336 *Nov 4, 1994Sep 10, 1996Lisco, Inc.Playyard and bassinet combination
US5615434 *Jun 30, 1995Apr 1, 1997Cracchiolo; James M.Viewing structure for infants
US5642538 *Sep 18, 1995Jul 1, 1997Creative Toy Products, Inc.Self-erecting play yard structure
US5697109 *May 12, 1995Dec 16, 1997Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US5752283 *Oct 15, 1996May 19, 1998Lisco, Inc.Low cost portable playyard
US5809592 *May 5, 1997Sep 22, 1998Creative Toy Products, Inc.Self-erecting play yard structure
US5826285 *Sep 10, 1996Oct 27, 1998Kolcraft Enterprises, Inc.Play yard
US5867851 *Jun 10, 1997Feb 9, 1999Kolcraft Enterprises, Inc.Play yard
US5957436 *Oct 16, 1997Sep 28, 1999Ristau; JoannAdjustable child stand
US5996144 *Dec 12, 1997Dec 7, 1999Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US6067676 *Oct 20, 1998May 30, 2000Graco Children's Products Inc.Playyard with a door
US6250837Sep 25, 1998Jun 26, 2001Kolcraft Enterprises, Inc.Rail joint
US6256813 *Oct 22, 1999Jul 10, 2001A. Glenn AaronCrib
US6289533 *Jun 16, 2000Sep 18, 2001Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US6378148Apr 8, 1998Apr 30, 2002Ergodyne CorporationPatient transfer system
US6496991Apr 7, 2000Dec 24, 2002Ergodyne CorporationDevice for patient pullup, rollover, and transfer and methods therefor
US6507963Aug 7, 2001Jan 21, 2003Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US6510570 *May 8, 2001Jan 28, 2003Graco Children's Products Inc.Playard having corner panels
US6550083 *Jan 7, 2002Apr 22, 2003Lamantia MarkCrib and playpen protective covering
US6591435Sep 23, 1999Jul 15, 2003Graham L. HodgettsPatient transport system
US6675413 *Oct 9, 2001Jan 13, 2004Ben M. HsiaLightweight bottom wall structure for playyard, pen, and cot
US6701546Aug 31, 2001Mar 9, 2004Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US6859958Apr 11, 2003Mar 1, 2005Lamantia MarkCrib and playpen protective enclosure
US6886194Mar 5, 2004May 3, 2005Barton Medical CorporationPatient transport system
US7003823Dec 22, 2004Feb 28, 2006Crib Saftey Net, LlcCrib safety net
US7290299Jan 10, 2005Nov 6, 2007Votel Thomas WDevice and method for positioning patients
US7404219 *Jun 8, 2007Jul 29, 2008Graco Children's Products Inc.Portable infant bed with side wall ventilation
US7434280May 24, 2006Oct 14, 2008Cyr Patrick CBed enclosure
US7543870 *Dec 8, 2004Jun 9, 2009Schwartz Frederick CInsert apparatus for a preexisting cart
US7752693 *Mar 20, 2007Jul 13, 2010Graco Children's Products Inc.Mattress structure for contained child play area
US8256041 *Oct 26, 2011Sep 4, 2012Grace GirdwainSlotless safety infant crib
US8479801Nov 16, 2010Jul 9, 2013Advanced Composite Structures, LlcFabric closure with an access opening for cargo containers
WO1999030662A1 *Dec 16, 1997Jun 24, 1999Barton Med CorpPatient transport system
WO2013012782A2 *Jul 16, 2012Jan 24, 2013Jhrg, LlcFabric closure with an access opening for cargo containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification5/97, 5/99.1, D06/331, 5/98.1
International ClassificationA47D7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47D13/066, A47D7/002
European ClassificationA47D13/06D, A47D7/00B